Doormaking Question

OK, I'm starting to look into making my own front door. I've never built one so I've ordered a book from Amazon that was mentioned on here a few days ago. The question will certainly be answered in the book but I can't wait :)
I've been looking at white oak for the door. Is it acceptable to laminate 4/4 oak to get the desired thickness or do you have to buy 8/4? I'm curious because 8/4 costs quite a bit more.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A good question. My gut tells me that you will not have problems laminating if grain, species, and dryness are same. However, this is an important job, rethink the 8/4 stock issue. It is more important but is that critical for this project.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I actually did this on a red oak door I made some time ago. It allowed me to create the mortices by routing each half instead of using a huge morticing chisel deep into hard ass red oak. It actually was 2 1/4" thick and 42x84. Worked out well. You should note that surfaced 8/4 is 1 3/4" thick and surfaced 4/4 is 3/4 to 13/16 thick, my point being that if you want to end up with the standard exterior door thickness of 1 3/4", you need to surface the 4/4 to 7/8". Jamie Bruce wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The thicker the lumber, the more prone to cracking, splitting, and warping it is. That's why plywood is relatively stable. Although I've never made a door from scratch before, I am assuming a laminated door is better.... Let us know how your door turns out. Mark
Bruce wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In rec.woodworking

Good point Mark, but now I'm even more confused. I've got 1 saying laminate, 1 saying better not too, and one in the middle. I had figured about 40 bd ft for the stiles and rails. The cost difference is about $75. While that is a significant difference on the total price of wood, it isn't enough money to worry about in the overall scheme of things. I want to do what will make the best. longest lasting door.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun 28 Sep 2003 12:11:29p, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote in

:-)
Par for the course, wouldn't you say? Though with a few more posts coming in, the majority seem to favor lamination or at least say that lamination probably wouldn't hurt, it seems to me to be the basic wreck response.
I've never built a door so I probably shouldn't even say anything but I do have a thought: given that most new lumber is from faster growth trees, would it not follow that a present-day solid wood door is more prone to warping than one made from slower growth timber?
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In rec.woodworking

Just visited Lowes. I'm not sure what this tells me but NONE of the doors there were laminated including the $2500 Oak doors. Is that a statement of the quality Lowes carries or the right way to do things?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 28 Sep 2003 17:11:29 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote:

I wanted to add to my previous comment. With proper glue (waterproof) and glue-up procedure you will have a better door in the long run. Getting the door as flat as possible, and to stay that way is important and can be a challenge with an exterior door.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use epoxy or resourcinol glue (urea resin).
Rick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bruce wrote:

I'm in the process of refinishing the front door of my home. The door is a Craftsman style three panel door with three lights, approximately 100 years old. Once I stripped it I was surprised to see that it is laminate construction with the laminate thickness spaced for insertion of the panels. Because of the door's detail, I doubt if this method was used because it was easier. My guess is that it was constructed this was to reduce warping.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In rec.woodworking

Good input Jack, thanks. I'm leaning toward lamination and for quality of construction now. The fact that it saves money is just a bonus.
Could you elaborate on the laminate spacing? Are you saying there are 3 laminated pieces with middle one being the required thickness to accomodate the panels?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bruce wrote:

Exactly. It also appears that the door was edge banded with the banding letted into the rails and stiles so that only 3/8" of each face visible when viewed for the edge. I can tell it's edge banded by looking at the recess for the lock set.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 28 Sep 2003 16:06:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote:

Very acceptable. Laminating will actually improve the stability. White oak is a good choice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bruce:
One of my specialties is making doors. GOOD ON YA for having the backbone to go for it! There is no rocket science to it!
That said, it IS EXACTING and does require some meticulousness and attention to detail.
I offer here a very few [suggestions] only, but born of experience:
White oak is a good choice but I suggest cypress.
Use a GOOD [MARINE] glue - generously, without getting sloppy of course, and DO NOT wipe off the ooze-out as you clamp it up as this will only serve to rub the glue deep/deeperinto the grain of the wood making staining, if that's your intent, that much harder. Scrape it off when DRY.
If the grain is appealing to you - and if you're using it I assume you find it so - I strongly suggest you seal it simply with a good quality spar-varnish such as Zar/renew as necessary.
I hope this helps you out...
Warmly, Griz
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
On Sun, 28 Sep 2003 16:06:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote:
"OK, I'm starting to look into making my own front door. I've never built "one so I've ordered a book from Amazon that was mentioned on here a few "days ago. The question will certainly be answered in the book but I can't "wait :) " "I've been looking at white oak for the door. Is it acceptable to laminate "4/4 oak to get the desired thickness or do you have to buy 8/4? I'm "curious because 8/4 costs quite a bit more.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In rec.woodworking

Griz,
Thanks for the advice. I will certainly heed it, but you didn't answer the primary question. Do you laminate doors or make them out of thick stock?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bruce:
'Sorry, I goofed again, this time in my proof-reading. The not necessarily clear item I was trying to illustrate was 1/2" thick, 40" long, 12" high and two per door were the iron hinges. I don't know how I dropped that detail in the writing of it, but it happened, 'sorry. Anyway, I'm sure you can see how they contributed mightily to controlling distortions over the decades. I think they were roughly twice as thick as they needed to be even by the standards of their time. Why is open to speculation.
I hope this helps and/or helps clarify. Again, I am sorry about my sloppiness.
Warmly, Grid
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
On Wed, 01 Oct 2003 00:38:12 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote:
"In rec.woodworking
" ">I offer here a very few [suggestions] only, but born of experience: " "Griz, " "Thanks for the advice. I will certainly heed it, but you didn't answer the "primary question. Do you laminate doors or make them out of thick stock?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bruce:
'Sorry, I goofed again, this time in my proof-reading. The not necessarily clear item I was trying to illustrate was 1/2" thick, 40" long, 12" high and two per door were the iron hinges. I don't know how I dropped that detail in the writing of it, but it happened, 'sorry. Anyway, I'm sure you can see how they contributed mightily to controlling distortions over the decades. I think they were roughly twice as thick as they needed to be even by the standards of their time. Why is open to speculation.
I hope this helps and/or helps clarify. Again, I am sorry about my sloppiness.
Warmly, Griz
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
On Wed, 01 Oct 2003 00:38:12 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote:
"In rec.woodworking
" ">I offer here a very few [suggestions] only, but born of experience: " "Griz, " "Thanks for the advice. I will certainly heed it, but you didn't answer the "primary question. Do you laminate doors or make them out of thick stock?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote in message

I built all of the doors for my house, and laminated the stiles on purpose, even though I bought 8/4 stock. I resawed the 8/4, and glued up the stiles so that they were bookmatched on both faces of the door. On some interior doors, the wood species on one side is different than the other so that the door matches the wood trim on each room. In this case, I had to laminate the rails, too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.