Door between garage and outdoors.

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In January, or so, I added to my "To-do list" that I needed to repair my door that was loose enough that wind would blow it open. The latch just wasn't long enough. In the meantime, I reinforced it from the inside so that the door would not open at all, for security.
Now, here in May, I've observed that it works just fine. It locks solid. T'ain't broke! %-)
One of my ideas is to put a piece of cork (sheeting) under the strike plate, or maybe something a little more substantial. Anything I can do that will allow me to build it up now, while still being able to close the door ought to be a step in the right direction, I think.
Obviously, this is not a "world-beater" problem, and I have mentioned two strategies that may help deal with it. I am just sharing it because it has an element of *humor* to it. %-). If anyone has anything to add, I'll listen of course.
In other news, I finished replacing the fan in my heat-pump. I inserted the fuse and am letting the crankcase heater run for a while before I try it out. I needed to extend/splice all of the wires from the motor. I bought a crimper pliers, and butt spliced the wires, coated the connections with Liquid (Black) Tape, and put shrink tubing over that. That ought to take case of those connections, huh? I mean, you wouldn't expect less from me, would you? ; )
Bill
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On 5/18/2012 12:51 AM, Bill wrote:

I live east of Raleigh NC and many of the garage pedestrian doors open out, rather than the normal into the garage. This presents a significant security problem, as you can be into the garage with a knife, faster that you can unlock the door.
While that is not the same as your problem, I think the solutions is the same, a dead bolt. I installed one with a key outside and a lever inside. I shimmed out the casing put a long screw Through the door frame into the 2X4 Studs, and then cut the hole for the dead bolt.
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If they can pull the hinge pins, the deadbolt may not be sufficient.
To ameliorate this, place two studs (16d nails with heads cut off work) in the hinge-side casing, leaving then extend 1 to 1.5" from the casing and drill a corresponding hole in the door edge. This way, if the hinge pins are pulled, the door cannot be removed from the frame unless it is already open.
Hinges are available with the studs built-in.
http://www.hardwaresource.com/hinges/DOOR+HINGES/Door+Hardware/Security+Stud+for+Hinges
scott
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writes:

Also hinges are available with welded hinge pins --- designed for out-opening doors, the pins cannot be removed.
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Keith Nuttle wrote:

Thank you very much! I think you are absolutely right. +10.
Bill
I installed one with a key outside and a lever

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Bill wrote:

After getting feedback here, looking at the door a few times, and reading a bit, I thought I would provide an update (before I commence cutting and pounding).
My wife observed that the door/door frame, screen door, etc. probably used to be on the front of the house.
Drywall goes up to the hinge side of the frame. Once I cut some of the drywall away, what is holding the door frame and door in place should be revealed! My 24"-level indicates that the hinge side of the frame is close enough to vertical.
The jamp on the hinge side is actually slightly narrower at the top and bottom than at the middle. And except for the gap being just a little wider on the hinge side than the latch side, this is just the opposite of the situation on the latch side (where the jamp is slightly wider in the middle than at the top and bottom). The top and latch side have not been shimmed.
If the entire door frame needs to be shimmed, I hope that whatever is holding the door in place now will not get in the way (this seems like a key potential problem to me).
I'll refrain from writing more so that I don't obfuscate things. As a minimum, I could shim the top and latch side with hopes that this would take care of my winter-time problem of the door not closing tight. I think that's what my dad would advise--but not because he had any special expertise with doors; I think he would have me listen to you.
I'm going to close this door, while I go work on my worktable.
Bill
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On Fri, 18 May 2012 08:26:29 -0400, Keith Nuttle

What kind of garage construction? Sounds like the structure may be heaving from frost? changing the size and shape of the opening??
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wrote:

That was my first thought too. Another possibility is the door shrinks due to the cold (metal door?). Either way I'd check to see of the door had the proper clearance to the jamb. Art
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The structure, an attached garage, is brick. I think that seasonal changes in humidity are causing the door-width to change. The edge of the door frame at the top is not likely to change as much due to the direction of the wood grain.
A dead bolt will provide a nice solution, albeit one involving a bit of work. I anticipate installing the dead bolt, and will investigate the process further. There are glass window panes in the door exactly 6" to the left of the edge of the door where the dead bolt should go. To me this suggests that no hammer should be used throughout the installation. I'm thinking smooth running power tools (like and drill) and chisel by hand. Is that about right?
Bill
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Just out of curiousity, if you take the trim off on the knob side where are the shims located at? I don't know much about installing doors, but if there's no shims near the strike plate, I would think it possible that the jamb moving might be the issue.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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Puckdropper wrote:

Are you saying that correcty (the latch comes out of the knob side, right?) I don't think there are any "shims", but the alignment is correct. I may have tried shimming the strikeplate already, in the winter, without much success (I don't recall the details). I've already had my nose in there more than one time! Thanks for reminding me to check this Puck.
I was thinking, if I do install a deadbolt, I should maybe position it out of sight of the window!
I'm off to make some sawdust!
Bill
I don't know much about installing doors, but

Hmm... I don't think the strike plate moves, but "shims" seem like a separate issue. Maybe I don't understand "shims". To me a shim is a piece of material placed underneath the strike plate to raise it.
Cheers!

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Bill wrote:

Or get a deadbolt that uses a key on inside and out.
--
G.W. Ross

I'm too smart to let my intelligence
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G.W. Ross wrote:

Ahh (<Duh>)! Thank you very much! -Bill
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"Bill" wrote in message

Ahh (<Duh>)! Thank you very much! -Bill ===========================================================================It's up to you of course but I wouldn't have any exit door that needed a key to get out.
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CW wrote:

Good point! I'll see if I might be able to shim the door as has been suggested. It's certainly the most practical option.
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Bill, use a deck screw to go through the shims. It's micro-adjustable for that perfect jamb alignment. Especially if your wooden door is tempermental. If so, take it down and be sure to seal the top and bottom. They get missed when painting or varnishing. Steel and FG doors are much less tempermental during wide humidity swings.
-- The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man. -- George Bernard Shaw
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My home in Vista, CA had all dual-keyed deadbolt locks and it caught a burglar once. He cut himself coming over the broken window into my room and then found that he couldn't get out any of the three doors because they were all keyed. He didn't find any of the keys I hide by the doors, either, so he tried to go back out the window. Someone had called the cops by then so he was nabbed coming out of my house. In an emergency, I (or other people) could always go out a window, but keys were available.
I love dual-keyed deadbolts for their crimefighting demeanor. They're perfect for those halflite doors which have the window a few inches from the deadbolt. I had bought keyed chain locks before the dual-key deadbolts and those kept me unburglarized a couple times, too. (no, that's not one of the features of LoCal that I miss.)
-- The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man. -- George Bernard Shaw
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On 5/20/2012 12:49 AM, CW wrote:

Are you serious? We have "french" doors to exit our den and also our master bedroom. With that glass (in a french door) a double keyed deadbolt was a "must". We keep the key "handy' but not accessible from a broken pane.
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While it makes sense, it is against code in many places. Years ago, in my old house, someone tried to break in by the basement door by breaking out a pane of glass. The double keyed deadbolt kept them out.
Code or not, I have them in this house too.
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On 5/20/12 11:35 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

We have a big set of French doors (one fixed) on the back of the house. They are both full glass panels. I don't see the purpose of a double keyed deadbolt on full glass doors. If someone breaks the glass to get to the deadbolt.... they can walk right through the giant opening in the door.
This ain't like the movies where they stick a suction cup on the glass, cut a circle in the glass, pop it out and reach in to the deadbolt. This is safety glass, you try to cut it, it breaks into a million little glass pebbles in a pile on the floor.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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