Don't buy Green Paint Thinner

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Kevin wrote:

So much for the "green crap"!! Just like those curly fry light bulbs. Cost 4 times as much and if you drop one mercury spreads and attaches to your gold false teeth, gold and silver rings watches and bracelets. Not to mention someday most will end up in landfills where the Government will want 400 trillion dollar super fund to clean it up. What a bunch of ya who's...
Someone needs to put bounty's on Green Environmental Activists before they take away toilet paper!
--
"You can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"
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16/60 watt CFLs sell for $2.00 / 4 pack at HD. Less than 1 mg of Hg per bulb. The coal used to generate most of the electricity in the U.S. is loaded with mercury. Incandescents release more mercury into the environment, and that's not even if they're broken.
The 26/100 watt daylight (5000 - 6500 K) CFLs are the current standard for illuminating indoor marijuana gardens. At $4.00 per 2 pack, they're almost as cheap as the 60 watt replacements.
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An average household using 1 Megawatt hour of electricity per month (The US average) contributes 1 Mg of Mercury (0.9299 mg to be exact) to the environment each year for the electricity they use. So each light bulb you toss is the equivalent of a whole year's worth of mercury emissions from the use of electricity.
The power industry has cut emissions of mercury by more than 97 percent in the last 20 years on a per megawatt hour of electricity generated.
You can run your own numbers using the data at EIA.GOV if you don't buy my analysis.
I hope this helps. OBTW - that is about 15 tons of total mercury released into the environment. Where does the mercury trapped at the power plants and not released go? Into those CFLs you are buying. What was a waste product of the power plants is now an input to another manufacturing process.
New low Mercury and no mercury bulbs are on the way. They will just be more expensive.
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They also use magnesium to chemically filter out sulfur, which is resold to manufacture drywall.
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Mostly they use limestone in the fluid beds, not magnesium in the US. China uses limestone contaminated with magnesium, and did not collect sulfur in a separate bag house, like the US does.
There are very strict rules here (and in Canada and the EU) on the contaminates allowed in the gypsum that is created in the boilers. Sulfur in the boiler gypsum is measured in single parts per billion, magnesium showing up on a test will get limestone rejected from being used, it will be routed to the local concrete ready mix instead.
Most of the bad stuff, ends up being recycled these days. Sulfur is collected as sulfuric acid and sold to the chemical industry, meaning they don't have to mine it and make it separately. Mercury is collected and sold to the lighting and chemical industries, as well as the glass plants. Clinkers are sold to make asphalt. Ash is sold to concrete plants to replace sand, and so it goes. Roughly 95 percent of what went up the stack or into the landfill in the 1970s is sold as an input to another industry today.
If you are reading materials more than a few years old or derived from older sources, then you get a skewed view of the power industry today. Landfills cost money. So do the certificates that you have to buy (Cap and Trade) for mercury, sulfur and other air pollutants. Ash ponds are a huge liability, and so it goes. Power companies want to make profits, any expense they can turn into revenue is a good thing. It also means less waste in the landfills, air and water.
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"Father Haskell" wrote:

should have tested it first since you never used it before -- standard practice in finishing. That, or go straight to turps, which works great except for the smell (which I'm told some people actually like). ------------------------------------ Count me among the turps smell lovers.
Lew
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Father Haskell wrote:

Can you buy turpentine in California? Probably can, since it's 100% natural (like belladona or opium).
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Honestly, you'd be better off with a hempseed oil-based reducer, seeing how small kids like to chew on furniture. Belladonna is a group of strong delirient alkaloids best saved for grownups who have an appreciation for such things.
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wrote:

I won't!
Its amazing I have made it this far. My God, no helmet when riding a bike, motorcycle or skiing. No knee pads when walking down the street. I climbed trees when I was younger how on earth did I survive? Drove field cars until we crashed them and then did the environmentally sound thing, buried them with a back hoe. Wow, what would they say these days. I could probably be brought up on charges. Reckless endangerment of the Earth, oh my! Seems most of us are/were getting along fairly well without all these Pin Head Regulations. Yes please use Common Sense and do your part to try to make it at least better or the same as you found it.
--
"You can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"
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Will it thin any other colours?
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