Dog holes

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I'm making a cutting and assembly bench, using a solid core door with a sheet of 3/4" MDF as disposable surface. Any suggestions on how to drill dog holes? The holes will have to be about 2-1/2" (1-3/4" door + 3/4" MDF)
The drill press isn't going to work (the door weighs about 80#, alone). I thought about a forstner bit but perpendicular is a problem. I also thought about a router and template but it sounds like a lot of work.
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Drill a guide block on the drill press.
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wrote:

That's an idea. I guess I could make a thick template (to get the spacing right).
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I know how my dad would have done it, brace and bit. Those tools I have not yet gotten.
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wrote:

Perhaps. ...or he would have taken it to work and the machine shop would have put it on one of their Bridgeports. ;-)
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He had a Bridgeport in the basement, and a large metal lathe.
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wrote:

But dad wouldn't have had to moose it onto the Bridgeports. The machinists would have cut the holes for him. ;-) I don't think he was technically their boss but he looked out for them (he was a prof at the university).
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Have the guide index off the last hole. Constant spacing. Or have two and jump two starting at two starting points.
On 8/17/2015 11:41 AM, krw wrote:

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On Tue, 18 Aug 2015 22:40:11 -0500, Martin Eastburn

Yeah, the plan was to have a template that I could insert pins in the guide holes to index to existing holes. I'll try it on the door before I munge up a more expensive top.

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On Sunday, August 16, 2015 at 1:07:27 PM UTC-7, krw wrote:

I'd start the process with a plunge router and a jig (carefully space pilot holes). Then, proceed with a (Portalign or similar) drill guide, and do step-and-repeat enlarging of the holes. Use a hole saw, with a pilot pin instead of the usual pilot drill. You'll have to work at clearing the sawdust, of course, and the little donuts of wood will take a while to work out of the saw. That's why the drill won't overheat. :-)
<http://www.craftsman.com/craftsman-drill-guide/p-00967173000P
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

Forstner and a drill press is the obvious choice. Alternatively rig a support for a hand drill with a Forstner. Be sure to clear the chips regularly.
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On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 21:40:15 -0400, "J. Clarke"

The top weighs well over 100lbs. It's kinda unwieldy to get onto a drill press. OTOH, it's now on wheels. I'll have to see if the height is reasonable to get under the DP.
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wrote:

The step and repeat process sounds like it'll be difficult to get aligned properly. I looked at a drill guide quite similar to that at Woodcraft on Saturday. It looked too fragile, though I was thinking about a single pass with a 3/4" Forstner at the time.
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On 8/16/2015 4:07 PM, krw wrote:

you just mount a piece of hardboard to it, put a fence on it. Drill a hole however far you want the spacing. Then drill them with the router. Got an Onsrud HS 3/4 upcut bit.
As far as solid core door and mdf, they are not very good for dog holes. But you'll find out. Solid core means particle board usually.
--
Jeff

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I just drilled dog holes using an up spiral plunge router bit I cut 2 holes in a template the size of the router base as a guide. Clamped the guide squarely to the edge off the bench. A center line of the guide was lined up with a line on the table. Also, I got the bit from MLCS. Good luck, Kirk
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wrote:

That's where I was going but couldn't find a 3/4" upcut bit. Certainly not one long enough.

I hadn't planned on putting a vice on the table. The lateral loads should be fairly trivial.
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4ax.com:

The dog holes don't need to be 90.0 degrees to the surface. Anything close will do just fine. I drilled mine with a Forstner bit in a cordless drill.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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Puckdropper says...

Not sure I understand why the weight is an issue. Whatever you're drilling doesn't have to be supported by the drill press.

That should work.
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On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 23:44:53 -0400, "J. Clarke"

I have to move it under the drill press.

I'm pretty bad at getting even close to vertical with a hand-held drill.
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krw wrote:

Stand a square up close to where you are drilling, helps a lot when eye balling vertical.
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