Does people like using film faced plywood for Cabinet Making ?

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My US friend told me that he used film faced plywood for Cabinet Making . Do a lot of US/EU/Canadian people like using film faced plywood for Cabinet Making ? I want to know more about this because I export film faced plywood. As I know, people usually use film faced plywood as shuttering concrete form .
--------------------------- Mason Pan snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com Blog: http://www.plywood.cc /
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What the hell is film faced plywood? ~ some type of super thin veneered stock? A quick search on Google brought up only Asian suppliers of the stuff which immediately suggested to me that one should run the other way at the mere mention of the stuff, but no sites described what it was.
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Some People does like film, I went digital in the late nineties....and never looked back
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Mason Pan wrote:
| My US friend told me that he used film faced plywood for Cabinet | Making . Do a lot of US/EU/Canadian people like using film faced | plywood for Cabinet Making ?
| I want to know more about this because I export film faced plywood. | As I know, people usually use film faced plywood as shuttering | concrete form .
I use it for building machines and fixtures for woodworking machines - but have used it much less than I would have liked because I have been unable to buy full sheets and because what I have been able to buy is too expensive.
If you can sell a high quality plywood with the film facing at a reasonably low price, you should do well in the North American market.
In the EU, you will be competing with established Scandanavian producers of extremely high quality product. To succeed in that market you'll probably need to sell a still higher quality product at a lower price - which may be difficult from half a world away.
Let me invite you to post a few small photos showing colors of facing and a close-up of the edge of a 3/4" sheet on news:alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking - you may get some useful feedback.
I hope this is helpful.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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What exactly is film faced plywood Morris? Could be my original comment about it was completely wrong.
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Upscale wrote:
|| I use it for building machines and fixtures for woodworking || machines - but have used it much less than I would have liked || because I have been unable to buy full sheets and because what I || have been able to buy is too expensive. | | What exactly is film faced plywood Morris? Could be my original | comment about it was completely wrong.
The stuff I've used is sold at Woodcraft Supply with a green phenolic skin. Theirs is a high-quality baltic birch (I've never seen any evidence of any kind of void in any of the layers) but they don't sell full sheets. They seem to be pretty proud of it.
I know it's available elsewhere (but not in my neighborhood) and with a variety of skin color options, but I can't afford to have a few sheets shipped to me - I'd be pleased if Mason had a mid-American distributor.
It's favored for wooden concrete forms because the face is smooth and allows use of oily release agents without soaking the wood.
Incra usually shows their fixturing gizmos (like the UltraJig and sliding table miter jig) with a red-skinned version of this same stuff.
The phenolic seems to take paint (Krylon in my case) really well and, because of the moisture barrier, lends itself to applications (like CNC tooling) where dimensional stability is particularly important.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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wrote:

Another common name for it is medium density overlay or MDO.
Paul
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Paul Franklin wrote:

The stuff Morris was talking about has phenolic faces. MDO has faces of MDF.
Two different things.
Chris
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On Tue, 14 Aug 2007 15:40:46 -0600, Chris Friesen

Not so. From one of about a zillion web hits:
The initials MDO and HDO refer to either Medium Density Overlay or High Density Overlay. The overlay theyre talking about comes in the form of a phenolic (heat activated) resin impregnated paper that is laminated to the faces of a plywood panel during the manufacturing process. Medium and High simply refer to the weight and thickness of the paper panel face, but there are notable differences between these two as well.
Originally MDO was created to satisfy the requirements of long lasting Interstate Highway signs. Its usually produced to rigid specifications from very high grade materials and is supposed to last almost indefinitely in extreme weather conditions with no checking and with only a coating of paint (usually two-part epoxy) for protection. The panel is composed of fir cores and centers with the overlay over well-sanded knot-free faces. Nowadays, the faces are only fir, but in the past thin veneers of luan were used. The reason for the luan faces was to create an even smoother surface, which prevents the grain of the fir from telegraphing its pattern through to the surface. The same process is used for laminating fine-expensive wood veneer faces like teak over fir plywood, but of course without the phenolic overlay.
The surfaces of the MDO are waterproof, but stippled to readily accept and retain paint. The overlay is impossible to separate from the plywood, and if the edges are properly sealed the panel will last practically forever.
Paul
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Paul Franklin wrote:

From my own web hits, it seems there is some ambiguity. According to these guys (as well as others), there is a distinction between MDO and "film-faced plywood".
http://www.bizviet.net/tradeoffer_54135.html
Also, MDO seems to be more or less "regular" plywood, potentially with voids in the interior layers. The phenolic-faced stuff that Woodcraft sells (to which Morris referred) is more of a baltic-birch type product with phenolic faces. This seems to be something similar:
http://www.fcpcusa.com/koskiform.htm
Chris
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On Mon, 13 Aug 2007 21:33:10 -0700, Mason Pan

Never heard of it. I've been woodworking for 45 years in the US and have built many cabinets. Maybe there is another name for "film-faced ply?"
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Phisherman wrote:
| Never heard of it. I've been woodworking for 45 years in the US and | have built many cabinets. Maybe there is another name for | "film-faced ply?"
I don't know what other names it might have, but you can take a look here: <http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid958
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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By the description on that page you've supplied, it looks like regular sheet plywood with a phenolic resin impregnated into an outer ply.
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Upscale wrote:
|| I don't know what other names it might have, but you can take a || look here: <http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid958 | | By the description on that page you've supplied, it looks like | regular sheet plywood with a phenolic resin impregnated into an | outer ply.
Yep - although I'd sure like to convince the folks over at Menards that's what "regular sheet plywood" is supposed to be like.
Interestingly, the 3/4" material I've bought actually _measured_ 0.750".
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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I first heard of it as a vinyl film back around '96, I think it was, with huge machines popping out nearly complete tables and chairs coated with it. There are other kinds, specifically a polyester. It is sold as plywood, but is also sold as film for larger scale door and drawer and window and similar makers to use a decorative surface. It is so thin that heat bonding gives a tighter radius than is ever possible with vacuum bags and veneers.
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Thank all of you ! I export film faced plywood . Now , I know maybe nobody has used film faced plywood for cabinet making . What my friend has told me may be MDO or HDO , which is commonly used for cabinet making .
Film faced plywood is a kind of plywood covered with film, which is phenolic(or other glue) resin impregnated paper and different from MDO or HDO . The MDO/HDO film is thicker and looks much better . Film faced plywood also called shuttering plywood/shuttering concrete form/concrete form . It's usually used for shuttering purpose . Please refer to http://www.plywood.cc/products /
http://www.plywood.cc/wp-content/uploads/2007/08/film-faced-plywood-brown.jpg
Anti-slip film faced plywood can also be used for floor of room,cars and so on . Refer to anti-slip film faced plywood at http://www.plywood.cc/2007/08/16/anti-slip-film-faced-plywoodwire-mesh-film-faced-plywood /
http://www.plywood.cc/wp-content/uploads/2007/08/anti-slip-film-faced-plywood.JPG
Thank you again !
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Mason Pan wrote:

http://www.plywood.cc/2007/08/16/anti-slip-film-faced-plywoodwire-mesh-film-faced-plywood /
http://www.plywood.cc/wp-content/uploads/2007/08/anti-slip-film-faced-plywood.JPG
Good on you for putting us all straight. I learnt something.
regards John
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I'm very glad to share my knowledge with you . You all have helped me a lot . Thanks :)
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I'm very glad to share my knowledge with you . You all have helped me a lot . Thanks :)
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finnform.
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