Do you use bar oil in your chainsaw?

Page 6 of 8  

Same around thing here.......
...BUT...
The restaurant downtown serves up some mighty fine Spotted Owl Soup !!!
--
SVL







Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Modat22 wrote:

Oh that sounds like a good alternative!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Juergen Hannappel wrote:

Well, they <are> cutting trees, aren't they, the scum... :)
I really doubt the base of bar oil is any different than that for engine oil...just viscosity and (perhaps) some specific additives, but I'd not expect much there as the lubrication requirements are not onerous in terms of temperature, pressure, tolerances, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message writes:

using 10W30 engine

was just

environment it's

lubricating
dam about the

choice]...
what in the world makes you think oil is not biodegradable?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Asphalt releases more oil into the environment than chain saws ever will.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Never mind the hundred-plus years worth of oil-leaking jalopies that have been driven on those asphalt roads...
--
Don Bruder - snipped-for-privacy@sonic.net - New Email policy in effect as of Feb. 21, 2004.
Short form: I'm trashing EVERY E-mail that doesn't contain a password in the
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The county road crews around here routinely spray water based asphalt emulsion onto the roads and then top coat with rock chips...
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/1992/bacteria-0401.html
--
SVL



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
in message

biodegradable?
chain saws ever

based asphalt

chips...
Interesting. Now I'm thinking of a new version of "Beano" . . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IIRC, "Beano" is an enzyme.......
FWIW, home distillers ( moonshiners ) are reporting it being as effective as malt in converting ( hydrolizing ) complex starches into simple sugars.
Potatoes or corn, some yeast and "Beano", and you got yourself some mash....thinking this also works at a lower temperature than the amalyse ( sp ) too.
== Back to the oil--always seems to dissappear within a year or so from my gravel drive, and I find it hard to believe its all being washed away by the rain...
In fact, many municipalitys are now requiring a "grassy swale area" in order that any oily runoff from parking lots, subdivisions, and other such largely paved-over areas be allowed time in order to bio-process before the water leaches back into the soil in recharging the local aquifer.
--
SVL



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

order
largely
Well, no. Mostly that's to allow the runoff from storms to get into the ground rather than the sewers. You get fined for excessive flow of untreated sewage from your plant, and a storm overloads the system fast.
Not sure how it passed, but "environmentals" being the noisy folks they are, there was an ordinance up in the city that newly-constructed lots had to have "plantings" and grassy areas rather than just flat asphalt.
Now consider an average snowfall of ~200" and cars dripping with great salt stalactites. Not a lot grows around the lot, and it's tougher'n hell to get a plowing pattern to clear snow around the aesthetically pleasing curbs....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

water
These all flow into a simple french drain...
If it weren't for the presence of contaminants then what need for the gently sloped grassy swale???
Might as well just line a trough with concrete....
--
SVL




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PrecisionMachinisT wrote: ...

The area where we drained oil from tractors and trucks from as far back as the 20s until toughly the 70s or 80s is now covered in grass and is indistinguishable from that area surrounding it...when I was a kid it looked like almost like a paved road. It's broken down pretty well. Not a smart thing to have done, certainly, and I suspect a soil sample would show some residual, but certainly doesn't appear permanent....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Duane Bozarth wrote:

As I understand it, the problem is not so much what it does to the soil that it leaches through as what it does to the water table when it gets down there.
--
Proud member of the reality-based community.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Elmo wrote:

Certainly where there is either a pathway or the underground aquifers are surface-replenished, that's an issue. Here the aquifer is not surface-renewed at any significant rate at all, and while there are areas where surface contamination can penetrate (abandoned unplugged oil/gas wells being the prime culprit), there aren't any of those in this particular location.
Not justifying what was (although common in the time) a poor choice, simply noting it does appear that a great deal of recovery has occurred in a relatively short time since the action ceased....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Duane Bozarth wrote:

It may not reach _your_ aquifer but it's gotta go someplace. (Unless you're in a Death Valley type hole.)

I know. It's really amazing how quickly biological systems can recover when they are not overwhelmed by too much for too long.
--
Proud member of the reality-based community.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Elmo wrote: ...

Well, of course...simply commenting on local conditions...it's not <quite> a desert, but dry in comparison to most. It's a very sandy soil but there's a caliche layer at about 2-3' under the surface that is nearly impermeable. I'm sure some detailed soil sampling could find some remnants near that layer...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the
that it

there.
The oil itself is not a problem, IMO unless the environment is overwhelmed with it.
Besides.....because oil floats on water, I think I would be more concerned with any additives and residual contaminents that may come out of suspension.......
--
SVL





Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Elmo wrote:

Its not like the 'water table' is a big glass lined tank (like the Latrobe brewery - 33) all shiny and clean. And I was thinking, where does all that nasty oil come from in the first place? Down there in the ground. I say, set it free, let it return home!!!
AL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Duane Bozarth wrote:

Actually, the soil compression from logging is probably overall more harmful than any petroleum spills, fish excepted.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 23 Jun 2005 22:30:01 GMT, the opaque "George E. Cawthon"

Um, if the water table is contaminated by the oil, I'd -much- rather have soil compression and the resultant fewer trees, TYVM.
----- = Dain Bramaged...but having lots of fun! http://www.diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.