Do you care where your tools are manufactured?

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LOL. that sounds par. I guess you had better still be quick. ;~)
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

It is called an anti-drainback valve and most oil filter incorporate one. Without it your engine would take longer to build oil pressure at start up, which is a bad thing.
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John Horner wrote:

The valve is not present in the correct Toyota oil filter.
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B A R R Y wrote:

Not according to Toyota!
"An anti-drainback valve, which prevents oil from draining out of the engine and into the oil pan, helping to protect your engine from increased wear during cold starts."
http://www.toyota.com/html/shop/dealers/parts/oilfilters.html
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I think that feature is a general one that does not apply to all filters on all vehicles. Not all same brand filters operate the same. If genuine Toyota top located filters empty out there would be no check valve preventing this. Besides that, the statement is probably worded wrong. I do not know of a common automotive engine that oil does not naturally flow from the engine into the oil pan during operation. The oil goes into the filter before returning to the engine. They probably meant to say that some filters check valves prevent oil from draining from the filter back into the oil pan. The filter does take some time to refill if empty.
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Leon wrote:

This is way off the woodworking topic, but the function of an anti-drainback valve is to keep the filter full after the engine is shut down and oil pressure is no longer generated. It is normally a rubber flap which acts as a one way valve.
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You are correct.
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John Horner wrote:

I totally understand and agree. I've cut filters open to check 'em out. We cut open every filter that comes off my airplane to inspect for metal, so I have a purpose-made tool.
My filter is empty on this vehicle when I remove it, all 12 or so times I've done it. Frank's is not. <G>
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On some vehicles it does not matter if the filter oil drains back. Toyota has a specific spec for this particular filter and vehicle that the OEM must adhere to. Aftermarket tends to build fewer filters that work with many more applications and will add features that are not necessary in order to cut down on bigger inventories. Sometimes more features are cheaper to produce than 3 or 4 of the same basic filter with 3 or 4 varying degrees of protection built in side. Toyota's filter probably does not need the check valve and is probably left out to assist with an easier and less messy filter change. Franks filter probably adds .01% more protection during cold start up after setting over night, maybe.
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John Horner wrote:

I always change my own oil. I always use the Toyota OEM filter specifically listed for my 2005 Tacoma. The filter is mounted gasket down, on _top_ of the engine (the highest point in the oil system). I drive the truck on the ramps, drop the drain plug, and by the time I get back to the filter, there's nothing left in it but a few drops.
Frank's aftermarket filter is still full, on the same engine.
Interpret that however you wish. <G>
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 15:51:34 -0600, Frank Boettcher

Do you use Toyota filters?
I use the OEM filters, ($4.22/ea. if I buy 2 at the dealer, free plug washers included...) and by the time I get the truck up on my ramps and drain the oil, the filter is nearly empty.
Or, do you pull the filter before draining the pan?
Maybe aftermarket filters have some sort of check valve, which isn't necessary due to the location of the filter in relation to the lubricated parts?
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 18:56:15 -0500, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

No, this last change I used an premium aftermarket filter.

Nope, drained the pan first.

Not a big deal, put a container under the catch tray drain. Took one change to learn that.
But it's nice to be able to stand up and see what you're doing. I change my sons filter strictly by feel.
Frank
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LOL Or as in my wife's old Acura, feel and burn, jump and bang your knuckles.

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On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 13:44:51 GMT, "Leon"

Transverse engine, back side of block, up in a pocket? I've never actually seen that spot, just always hope I got the seat clean before putting the new filter on.

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Yup, that's the location. Hopefully if you get a little dirt in there the filter will get it immediately. I retired from the automotive industry 12 years ago and started in it when I was going to school. I changed lots of oil in cars while working part time. NUMBER 1 rule, look to make sure the filter gasket came off of the engine. Never had a problem with that until, ;~) I did not check the filter on the Acura. I never realized just how fast an engine can pump oil out of the engine when you use 2 gaskets on the oil filter. About 6 seconds as I recall.
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 10:03:14 -0600, "Leon"

LOL. Similar experience. While blindly trying to install the new filter, knocked off the gasket. But it didn't fall out. Thought that it had a different feel when I tried to seat the filter hand tight. Cranked up to check for leaks. Oil going everywhere. shut down immediately, massive cleanup followed. Lot's of cussing the filter manufacturer for the cheesy way the gasket was set.

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LOL, The interior is on par with GM however I think I prefer the vinyl over the plastic door trim panels. Other than that everything else looks better. IMHO. ;~) Oh, and the 5.7 does have enough power. ;~)

You have the V6, I was delighted to see the oil filter on top when I took the Tundra V6 on a test drive. Unfortunately the 5.78 has a hidden oil filter that to this day I have not seen. I think it is located on the bottom front of the engine above a skid plate. It may very well pay to let the dealer change the oil, all 7 to 8 quarts. I'll have to watch them on the first change and see where the filter is and how much trouble it will be to change it.
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 21:57:40 GMT, "Leon"

The 4.0 has plenty of power in the Tacoma! <G>

Sorry!
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Charlie Self wrote:

When General Motors divorced Isuzu recently, Toyota stepped in a bought a minority interest in Isuzu. Isuzu is the source of GM's Duramax truck diesel engines. Dodge gets it's from Cummins and Ford's is from Navistar. So you see, the US truck makers only look like they have an edge in diesel powered trucks. In reality the engines are bought from third parties and are available in any interested enough maker.
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I understand the new diesels will have to have Urea introduced to help cut down on the pollution. Urea? Apparently the dealer will have to fill that tank periodically. Honda is coming out with a diesel that will not need the Urea to pass the emission tests.
The biggest discomfort of my older 97 and the new 07 GMC and Chevy vehicles was and are the back seats. You have to like setting in a back seat that forces a right angle seating position and a seat back that is perpendicular to the ground to call the back seat comfortable. As with my older Silverado the fronts seats were acceptable.
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