Do you care where your tools are manufactured?

Page 9 of 16  

wrote:

I suspect that may be true however the Chey Volt has very similar performance, mileage, and operating cost expectations. Additionally IIRC not all Zaps are 3 wheeled.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

All the ones you can buy are. They have vapor ware announcements of coming miracle cars on a regular basis. Time will tell if any actually get to market.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Seems like I heard the same thing about the Saw Stop. :~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

For every one of these coming-miracles you hear about only a fraction actually make it. Saw-stop's project was many times easier to pull off than a car which actually meets a rigorous set of safety standards is. In the end the Saw-stop folks were able to add their nifty device to the product of a machinery contract production shop in Asia. 95% of the product is pretty much the same technology one finds in a 40 year old Delta Unisaw. Safety, uptime and reliability requirements are mostly set in the minds of customers, not by rigorous goverment test procedures. The point is that there are few real parallels between the Zap and Saw-stop companies.
I hope Zap pulls it off, but the odds are against them. Several years back I toured the Corbin factory where the "revolutionary" Electric Sparrow was to be made. They actually got about 300 of them onto the market but the company went down in a flurry of recalls and lawsuits. Lots of upset dealers and investors who had put up money and gotten none of it back. Sparrow never made it past the three wheel (no safety testing needed) stage. After going bust another guy bought the remains. He went bust and then a small outfit in Phoenix picked up the pieces and I think is still plugging away making Sparrows at almost $30k each, which is crazy money for a golf cart missing a wheel.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 27 Nov 2007 21:38:48 GMT, "Leon"

They're claiming a lot of things, they're just not doing so well in backing up those claims. Most of what they're using are miniscule little scooter-type vehicles that will never survive in the real world.
Let us know when they can run cars that are already on the road with their technology.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

From what I understand, the cars have been on the road for the last 10 years through out the world with 100,000 units sold.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 28 Nov 2007 17:01:35 -0600, "Leon"

Maybe I was unclear, I was talking about the same sort of cars you can buy off any car lot in the country. Not a little 3-wheel piece of crap, an American family car that seats 4-5 people, can carry your groceries home, etc. That's not what they're building right now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

You need to study the facts behind the hype.
Zap claims "over 100,000 units sold". Guess what, the vast majority of those were electric scooters and go-kart type vehicles. They have yet to make a single car if by car one means a vehicle licensed and registered as a car. Their only "cars" are three wheeled vehicles which are licensed and registered as motorcycles to avoid safety rules.
Zap regularly announces great plans, but so far has yet to produce an actual car or truck. Actually they don't MAKE anything as all of their products to date are labels slapped on Chinese products.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Brian Henderson wrote:

Dipping in:
But its a good stick to beat the populace with, here you can drive a toyotter prissyarse in London without paying the congestion charge, but how many people can afford one? Not many! Then there's the displaced environmental damage caused by building them, disposal is just as bad, replacement batteries 3-5 years as well add's to the problem. You can't carry much in one, their heavy for size and can't tow a trailer either. My Diesel 110 Land-Rover is 22 years old, has contributed less polution during its lifetime per year/mile than a prissyarse ever will and is almost the ulitmate rebuildable and recycleable vehicle on the road, can carry large loads and tow upto 3.5 Tons, very useful for a woodworker!
Niel, back to lurk mode...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 25, 12:23 pm, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

Got to drive the then new Tundra in September of '06 at a press conference. That one was immense, had the immense gas V8, and the power was almost frightening. No quality comments apply, as the interior trim and other bits were not yet set, but it pulled like a train. They did announce, in response to questions, that a diesel would be forthcoming in a year or two, but gave no details at all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 13:01:47 -0800 (PST), Charlie Self

Ask Leon. <G>
I have a "little" Tacoma, which had no problem towing a 5000 lb. Volvo fro Westchester airport to Meriden, CT a few weeks back.
Did I mention the oil filter is on top of the engine?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Where it belongs. Oh, how I hate changing oil on an engine with a filter mounted open end up. What ever made anyone think that was a good idea?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 21:22:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

You got that right.
A 20 oz. soda bottle sits nicely on the belt to collect what falls in the drip tray.
What, there's no drip tray on other trucks? <G>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 21:22:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Unless it's a Chevy S-10 or blazer with 4 wheel drive.. Instead of planning the filter on top, Chevy discovered that with 4x4, the transfer case interfered with the oil filter.. Redesign the engine or T-case? Hell no.. They put an "adapter" on the oil filter port and ran lines to and from the new filter mount under the hood.. As a result, the most often question inmost Chevy 4x4 groups is "how to fix leaking oil filter lines" My kid's blew out on him on the freeway.. fun.. Oh.. AFAIK, they never did do it right.. my '95 and a friends 97 blazer still have it and we both carry a $100 replacement kit for when it goes..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They don't change because it is done right the first time. ;~) If you recall the old Oldsmobile diesels engines back in the late 70's and early 80's, the filter system was totally bogus and was the source of 50% of its problems. The very last year the Olds diesel was built and used in the early mid 80's they put an elaborate fuel filter system on. It should have been put on the second year after all the problems in the first year.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or, they could have designed a real diesel engine and had a lot less problems..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


That too. ;~) Even after all those years it was in production it was always changing and getting no better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 21:17:52 GMT, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

Yep, isn't that delightful. As one who has always changed oil myself, I really like that. I did have to learn (the hard way) that the "catch"tray around the filter will not actually hold the entire contents of the filter ( I would have bet good money it would) and that one should pull the drain plug and place a container beneath first, but after that lesson, I'm happy.
Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Have you tried letting the vehicle set for 10-15 minutes to let the oil in the filter drain back in to the engine? Or is there a check valve that prevents that?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 22:05:56 GMT, "Leon"

I guess their is a check valve. The vehicle sat for at least that long on my last oil change.
Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.