Do you care where your tools are manufactured?

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I think there are some Delta/Guelph Canada people in there too.
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 14:57:15 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

I believe including the former head of Delta, Canada, a fine individual.
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 15:41:11 -0700, Doug Winterburn

Yep, know them all. Not experienced with their product other than to look at it at shows, but the individuals behind the product are the best in the business as far as I'm concerned.
Frank

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Frank Boettcher wrote:

... and the Delta tool line was one of those places that people were willing to pay for that quality.
Now the consultants have been paid, the switch has been made such that recovery to the pre-change state is most likely nearly impossible, and the executives are left with a dwindling market in that segment with a high return rate and higher warranty costs. You know what that means, right? They are going to have to bring in some highly paid consultants to identify the problems and get recommendations for turning things around.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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Mark & Juanita wrote:

There are very few modern Delta branded tools for which I'm willing to pay a price premium, because it is almost all Chinese junk much like the competition's. Why pay Delta prices for Grizzly quality?
John
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wrote:

There was a time 15-20 years ago when Delta was the top of the line and brands like Jet were looked upon as crap. Now the situation has reversed and you're getting the brands that were laughed at years ago getting all the awards and traditionally respected brands losing out.
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Brian Henderson wrote:

Indeed. This makes Delta/Porter-Cable's current attempt to reposition itself as the brand of choice for "professional woodworkers" seem like too-little, too late.
For a good laugh, check out the July 2007 press release:
http://www.deltaportercable.com/AboutUs/PressRelease.aspx?BlockID [bb6e07-86f8-43b5-924c-9f8f6a665324
These guys used to be the top of the food chain, but now are somewhere in the middle.
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wrote:

bought a 45 YO Delta Unisaw and love it. Sold several other newer Delta products at garage sale prices and was glad I didn't have to haul them to the landfill. The sad part is if you don't want to support China what are the alternatives?? After they snubbed our navy even in "a port from storm" which has never been done in the history of sailing ships will our dipshit gov't limit imports....naw we are too STUPID to do that!!!!!!!!!! It's the dollar folks, our gov't is selling us down the tubes.
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Digger wrote:

You might want to look into the reasons that Matthew Perry visited Japan.

So how is keeping the prices of tools in the US higher than for the rest of the world helping American industry to grow? If our prices are the highest in the world we aren't going to be selling much on the world market and face it, the US domestic market doesn't have a huge amount of growth potential for durable goods.
--
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--John
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Can't find a factory job making tools? Get a job selling, repairing, advertising, or using them.. I remember folks used to give me shit for driving a Japanese truck instead of "buying American".. I use to tell them that besides the fact that Ford is a major player in Madza, I bought the truck from an American dealership... I'd also assume that it was worked on, transported, resold, etc. by American companies with American employees...
So, now I drive a Dodge truck that was made in the USA... Of course, it was assembled in Mexico and Dodge is owned by a German company, but it's "Made in USA"
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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mac davis wrote: ...

"was" is the correct tense (at the moment, anyway, who knows what's next)...
--
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

Indeed people show a willingness to pay more for higher perceived quality. Many folks buy a Honda or Toyota car for more money than the GM, Ford or Chrysler car in the same segment and pay more for it. They do so because they believe it is a higher quality product and for the most part their beliefs are well founded.
Every year Toyota and Honda add to their US manufacturing base and do so with great success. Honda and other Japanese companies have taken command of the small engine and marine engine markets as well.
Most of these outsourcing decisions are made by overpaid MBA graduates who only care about putting "accomplishments" on their resumes to further pad the paychecks.
John
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I literally looked at a 07 Tundra last afer looking at GMC and Chevrolet. I have always owned GMC and Chev trucks and had a $6K+ incentive to go with the GM products again. After driving GM I decided to not buy at all but went a head and drove the Tundra because I had an appointment to do so. It was a no brainer to choose the Tundra. The GM products were uncomfortable amd the rear doors flexed and mooved while going over bumps.

The simple fact is, the US economy is no longer big on manufacturing. It is no longer as profitable to over pay workers for a skill that 3rd world countries can do. If they could not do the work we would not be buying their products. If we want better we buy Japanese or European. Its the Capitalistic way of doing business. Until the US can deliver equal value or better the manufacturing jobs will go to other countries. The manufacturing phase in this U.S. economy has come and gone and I would imagine a lot of it is because of the large unions that have negotiated workers benefits so much that the worker benefits more from the production of products than the business does. It's a no brainer, have your products built by a company that is not smothered by union labor.
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Leon wrote:

One thing the foreign pickups don't have is a diesel. Last year I got a used (57k miles) '04 Silverado 2500HD 6.6L Duramax regular cab full box with the Allison transmission. The previous owner put a Banks exhaust system on it. It is one towing machine for my 5th wheel! Gets 23mpg highway and 13.5mpg towing (on a 4200 mile trip this last summer). It was _very_ comfortable on that trip.
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 09:29:56 -0700, Doug Winterburn

Oddly enough, they sell them everywhere else but North America. Many Tacomas are sold worldwide, as the Hilux, with diesel engines. The 4 liter gas V6 is a North America-only powerplant.
The pickup truck as we know it, is kind of an American novelty in certain ways.
Everywhere I've been around the world, most light commercial trucks are either Sprinter-style vans or small, 6 wheel diesel cabover trucks, ala Mitsubishi or Hino. I've seen both with 4 wheel drive.
It's very rare to see something like our leather-encrusted, quad-cab, chrome plated pickups. It's not that you wouldn't see NICE, _EXPENSIVE_ vehicles around, just that they're usually cars. The rest of the world seems to have a much more distinct line between truck and car, and different tastes.
FWIW, Toyota is playing with a large dually diesel now:
<http://www.theautochannel.com/news/2007/11/05/069676.html
It's got an 8.0 litre, inline-six turbo diesel. <G>
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 17:23:13 GMT, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

That's because Americans don't really like disesl. It's like looking at the car market in the UK and Europe compared to the US. There are tons of really nice, extremely gas-efficient cars made in Europe but because they're not the size of a schoolbus, Americans won't drive them. We bitch about gas heading for $5 a gallon, but we won't give up our gas-guzzling SUVs. Go figure.
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wrote:

The biggest problem with Diesel in the US is passing the latest emission standards. I have heard that many will have to use Urea injected some where in the process and that is obtained from the dealer.
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Brian Henderson wrote:

And there are (or at least were) some reasons for that -- noisier, odor, harder starting in cold weather, relative limited fuel availability for passenger cars (rather than commercial trucks), inexpensive gaoline, etc., certainly played a role in there not being much of a significant demand. More recently, it's been the EPA emission standards that apply to passenger vehicles as opposed to trucks that are a hindrance.
I would wager if the fuel costs and distances in other parts of the world, primarily Europe, had been similar that the similarities to US vehicles would be far more than they are. As the saying goes, "different time, different place".
--
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Brian Henderson wrote:

Those of us that tow 5th wheel trailers love diesel power/torque and mileage compared to gas. You can pretty much tell what's under the hood when you come to a long uphill grade. My tow runs about 11,000 gross with a 1200 lb hitch weight. Other than occasional light chucking, the rear view mirror is the main indication something is behind the truck.
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Brian Henderson wrote:

Maybe because we know there are answers other than driving glorified bubbles powered by lawn mower engines? We have ample opportunity, shale oil in the west, Anwar to the north, oil off of Florida before the Chinese and Cubans suck it dry, etc. The reserves are there, but the will to overcome the resistance to developing our own sources seems to be weak.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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