Do you care where your tools are manufactured?

Page 4 of 16  
On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 17:31:47 -0700, Mark & Juanita

Before. Pentair only starting looking for a buyer after the strategy went very, very bad. The Tool Group, the most profitable part of Pentairs business throughout my tenure, went south in a hurry. Stock dropped to about half its pre consolidation/globalization level losing about a billion bucks of shareholder value.
Public record. Annual reports. Glossy words, but you can't hide the numbers. Also Fortune wrote an article about the disaster, 2000 or 2001. It was very accurate except for the parts that indicated the "current Corporate management had a handle on the fix".
Frank
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

Thanks. I bought some Pentair stock in 2004 when things seemed to be going up and shortly before the announcement to sell off Delta. Just got out a few months ago; I didn't lose money, but could have done better if I had bailed in 2005.
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

Who currently owns the Tupelo and other manufacturing facilities and what is being done with them, if anything, Frank?
(Would it be possible to line up a set of investors and try to make an "All-American" brand?)
Where is Saw-Stop manufacturing, do you know? I always presumed they were using offshore contracted production, but don't actually know...
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The Tupelo facility is just an empty building, currently owned by Journal Enterprises a charitable arm of the local newspaper, who have it available for lease. All the machinery was auctioned off and the tooling scrapped out for the most part.
The rest of the tool group facilities were transferred to B & D when the business was sold. I've not fully kept up with that, but I believe the Oldham facility was closed and Biesemeyer in Mesa, AZ may be in the process. Jackson, TN, is still open but with an ever shifting charter.

Virtually impossible at this point, in my opinion. We continued to be successful before the consolidation/globalization because, among other factors, the invested capital was so low. The facility, machinery, and tooling were, for the most part fully depreciated but well maintained and continuously upgraded. Capital was spent only as necessary to maintain quality, improve efficiency and introduce new products. Which is how it should be.
It takes a tremendous range of equipment and tooling to be a full product line woodworking machinery manufacturer and the invested capital to start from nothing would be very large, and put the firm in an immediate position of being not competetive. While the market for the higher quality product was slowly but steadily growing when we were in operation, I believe the premium for product from a start up operation in the U. S. would be too high to be attractive.

Don't know, have not kept up with Saw Stop except for threads here relating to whether the technology should be mandated which I am not in favor of.
Frank
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

I figured it probably had been dispersed, unfortunately. It would be an interesting thought otherwise, though... :)
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

Saw Stop is made in China.
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B A R R Y wrote:

I figured so, but wasn't sure...
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And is considered to be a high quality piece of equipment, further indicating that the cheap crap coming from China is per the American importer instructions. The good products coming from China are also per the American importers instructions.
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Leon wrote:

No argument here on that score...each has a price point/market segment they're trying to hit and some are better at implementing controls than others. Mattel comes to mind as the latter, maybe... :)
OTOH, there are overseas importers selling direct who are pretty much "get away w/ whatever can" including direct patent infringement, counterfeit logos/brand marks, etc., etc., etc., ... So in some cases it's not the importers who are actually the "'Murricuns". There's plenty of shady folks on all sides of all bodies of water or territorial boundaries.
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Leon wrote:

I checked out a Saw Stop in person recently, and it does appear to have very nice fit and finish. If the materials match the fit and finish, the saw will prove to be a very high-quality tool.
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B A R R Y wrote:

Only if you consider Taiwan part of China, which is the subject a lots of debate!
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John Horner wrote:

Oh, ok. That's much easier to get accomplished, then, I'm sure. (The political aspects I won't comment on. :) )
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dpb wrote:

From: http://www.sawstop.com/how-it-works-faqs.htm
"25. Where is your saw made? The electronics are made here in the United States and the saw and accessories are made in Taiwan. "
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

I mean what percentage of the overall share of the market will be theirs 10, 20, ?? years from now? There are more folks here on a percentage basis that buy higher-end than the overall market I think simply owing to the nature of the group. Otoh, it appears to me the purpose of new strategy is to try to make inroads towards the broader segments. That, as I said before, isn't what _I_ would have wanted, but it seems where they're going. They may drive the car completely in the ditch, too, I don't know...
Again, I wish many things were the way they used to be, including casting foundry in McMinnville, but it's a different world...
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Why on earth......
Frank
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

We've discussed this before as well, Frank. Delta isn't only place where changes have occurred, not all to our liking...
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I mean why the McMinnville foundry?
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

Then PM would still be manufacturing in TN, too...I figured you'd pick up on that in a heartbeat...
I'm sure I've told the story of picking up stuff there directly years ago and getting the cook's tour...
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What you're looking for in gray iron castings is consistent adherence to specification for chemistry and mechanical properties. Castings vary by size and complexity of geometry and the best castings come from foundries that have specialized processes that perfectly fit the size and complexity. They are usually very large, high tonnage foundries and have multiple processes (Disamatic, match plate, cope and drag, etc.) or they specalize in just one process and one size range.
Small, product dedicated, foundries that try to do a full size range without the highly automated equipment for the smaller castings, or the overall pouring tonnage, find it difficult to compete. I think the McMinnville foundry fell into that category, although, I believe the foundry actually outlived the PM manufacturing facility. Delta had foundries in the past, closed them in favor of sourcing from the large specialists, improving quality and lowering cost.
I think they still assemble in the Nashville area, but source their parts from wherever. The contract facility that machines their tables, also makes the tables for the Unisaw. At least that's how it was a year or two ago.
The closing of their McMinville operations was sad. I had always considered them a worthy competitor with great products, not an import copycat company.
Frank

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Frank Boettcher wrote:

You probably know some/all of these guys:
http://www.steelcitytoolworks.com /
I know their manufacturing is done in Chiwan, but does anyone have any comments on their quality?
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