Do you care where your tools are manufactured?

Page 16 of 16  
On Mon, 03 Dec 2007 18:15:45 GMT, Brian Henderson

Hasn't worked so far... not sure why but might be different picking seasons or just lotsa of workers??
mac
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Not boxes, bins. A bit over $12.00 per bin. A good picker can pick about two bins per hour.
(Doug Miller) wrote:

many
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CW wrote:

So how did the farmers get their crops in, say, 40 years ago, before there was the massive flood of illegals we have now?
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On Tue, 27 Nov 2007 21:09:11 GMT, Brian Henderson

No way... more room for us here when they leave.. lol
Really, there are huge amounts of Mexican citizens coming back to from the States, mostly to Baja where high tech companies are getting very big.. Especially on the border near San Diego..
I'd like to see the flow going away for selfish reasons, though... keep things inexpensive here in Baja.. Contractors building houses in my area can't get enough labor and the cost of building has more than doubled in the last 3 years..
mac
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It's hard to buy what is not available.
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wrote:

I believe it happens often. Picture a company making this decision after listening to the consultants telling them how great it's going to be. Then they set up a time line and start to build bridging quantities in their U. S. operations that are being shut down. Then things don't go well with the transition. Those promises made by the Taiwanese brokers (who are really running the show) aren't kept. The bridging quantity gets depleted. You are facing a season with nothing to sell. So what do you do? You sell the stuff that is not quite right something you said in the beginning you would never do.
Frank

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Frank Boettcher wrote:

Uh, you missed their taking over the entire consumer electronics industry.
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Some tools are needed immediately for a specific job with an intended "one time" use (A). Others are considered useful with a foreseeable use over time, but no immediate need/demand/requirement. (B). Then there are those you will use regularly with some hope of precision and "repeat-ability." (C) Of course there are those tools that are cheaper to replace than sharpen/repair given the intended or experienced frequency of use." (D) Lastly(?) there are tools you just want to experiment with to see if the investment in the FEIN version might be worth the 10X price differential over the chink rip-off. (E)
When you are on a tight budget, you might find the one-time biscuit joiner from HFT will get you through the project, allow you to learn about the tool generally and the important and superfluous features to should you ever decide your craftsmanship warrants a fine version of the tool. The subsequent time(s) you go to pull it out will hint at the need for a quality replacement - e.g. can you find it, recall where you put it as much as will the ease of use, repeatability and the finished work.
Those eight-dollar 4" Grinders can clean a weld as well as the $50 Sears model for a fellow with a dusty Arc Welder hidden in the dark recesses of his shop. But might not prove cost-effective for a welding shop with a fancy TIG, arc stabilizer, etc.
A good link belt and sharp blade will go a long way toward making theat Craftsman table saw a "gem."
My grandfather's expression "'tis a poor workman that blames his tools," holds true today and watching that fellow on PBS ho uses 1700's versions of tools (including a foot-operated scroll saw!) should prove that point.
Its a balance of budget, craftsmanship and need in my view and the geo- political angle is nice cocktail talk, but impractical and unlikely to kill NAFTA etc.
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