Do Silent Or Nearly Silent Air Compressors Exist For the Home Shop?

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One thing that has always bugged me about air compressors is that they're noisy as hell. (At least the big Sears kind, which is what we have at work.) That's why I've never bought one for my home workshop.
Yet when you visit the automobile service station you never hear the damn things, just the whizz of the impact wrench. I'm going to ask the local mechanic on my next visit but I think I already know the answer: it's outside and it's an industrial unit. Translation: overkill and too expensive for the home shop. Correct?
So is there anything that's truly silent or very nearly so for the home shop? I'd really like enough CFM to drive a small sand blaster with it but not if the compressor is going to have SWMBO and her minions running me of the reservation as my workstop is in "my" half of the two car garage, directly below the living space.
Suggestions or recommendations?
J.
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I just bought the little Senco. They claim 65db and that sounds about right. Okay, it has very little capacity, which is why it is so quiet; but you can't have everything.
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I ahve seen that little guy. It isn't an oil less compressor, and it is very quiet. I am toying with one for my shop. It just seems to purr.
John
Toller wrote:

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I have one too. Its great for brad guns. But its a pea shooter in capacity. Forget trying to use it for anything but a brad gun or pneumatic stapler.
Bob
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I also have a 4 gallon tank. Could I hook it up to the tank to use with something bigger? I understand it will take several minutes to refill the tank, so the rate of use will be pretty feeble, but any reason it wouldn't work?
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stapler.
A 4 gallon tank is pretty small. I don't think it would be useful for anything except a few pops with a nail gun. Forget it for tools that require continuous air.
Bob
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What model did you buy?? Looking at their website there seems to be a couple.
http://www.senco.com/con_rem/prod_finder.aspx
Toller wrote:

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I bought the PC1010. It was about $100 from a dealer on Ebay.
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Hey, I have the "affordable" Porter Cable 6 gallon pancake. My ears bleed when it fires up. I also have a 12 year old 25 gallon sears unit in my shop. Likewise, my ears bleed when it fires up. The fact is, just about any belt driven compressor that you have to oil is going to run quieter. That said, ask yourself the question. Am I going to buy the filters to keep the oil out of my spray gun? A small laquer job is not worth breaking out the hvlp unit. Unless there is a chance of oil getting in the gun and mixing ,or not mixing well at all, on my beautifully crafted, expensive hardwood project. I am of the opinion that compressors that you have to oil, are more at home in the mechanics shop than the woodworker's shop.
Tom in KY, thinking about putting my compressor under the counter and see if that helps keep the blood off of my collar. My wife thanks you John B. and I do too.
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These aren't really for spraying. Can't you put the compressor outsicde close to your neighbour's house. That's what I am planning.
snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net wrote:

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Jun-Air makes some small "really quiet" air compressors. They are about as noisy as a frost free refrigerator and really quite amazing, but their price is a bit more (150%) than a typical pancake compressor.
I have one (4 cfm @ 60 psi pancake style) that I use when I'm doing power carving in my hotel room or doing demonstration carving at shows. The first time that I turned mine on I was in a cabinet shop environment, but off in a relatively quiet corner area away from the mainstream work. The light came on when I plugged it in, but I thought it was broken because I didn't hear it running. Then I realized that air was coming out of the valve. Careful inspection, and putting my ear against the compressor, proved me wrong. The small air pulse released from the unloader when it is shutting off is even louder than the compressor running noise.
I once used it with a Porter Cable brad nailer to do a job in an area where excessive noise was prohibited, and it did just fine. It'll build pressure to about 120 psi before it shuts off, so light nail gun use with it is possible. If I had originally intended to use it for nail guns I would have bought a larger one though. I had originally intended to use it only for power carving and it's perfect for that.
DAGS on Jun-Air air compressors
--
Charley


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We have a FINI brand small compressor that we carry for back-up work. It's a model that requires oil and looks amazingly like the small Senco pc1005 model. It's very quiet compared to the small Porter Cable pancake type models or a larger Emglo that we use on the job. It won't handle more than two guns at a time though and I'm not sure if it could handle the sandblaster. If you needed a larger model, could you just put it outside and run the hose into the garage?
Mike O.
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I have considered rolling a Sears beast outside and putting it inside a padded, insulated box. I just don't know where I'd store the box when it's not in use... :-)
J.
Mike O. wrote:

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You want a compressor that has the seprate motor with belt drive single or twin piston compressor. These are quiter. Service stations usually have them in a storage room.
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You are quite right about location. I work in a machine shop. Our air compressors are outside. It has two advantages. It eliminates having to listen to it and it's better for the compressor due to better airflow. It's not at all unresonable to do that at home. Couple of holes in the wall, a litttle pipe and a little wiring.

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and then hope your neighbors don't add some little holes in the wall.. *g*
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Put in a vented shed, you'll hardly hear it at twenty five feet. If your neighbors are closer than that, you're living in the wrong place.
wrote:

It's
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As you stated, that you want to run a sand blaster, and tat requires a fair amount of "cfm"-cubic feet/minute, which means a large compressor. I am a field service tech for Atlas Copco air compressors, capacity and quietness generally (in less expensive air compressors) do not go together, if price is important than a exterior location with sound deadening material is the answer, however if you have the money or that, and can afford to put some more with it then I would suggest looking into a Atlas Copco oil free scroll (SF2) compressor, as I have serviced many located in quiet work areas in a lab at "Shrinners Hospital in Boston MA", at many "Lens Crafters" locations. I'm not sure of there cost, I would guess around 4 to 5 thousand, they are available in single phase (220-230) volts as well as the commercially normal 3 phase (208/230-460) volt. Expensive but very quiet, just about as big as a dormitory refrigerator and not as loud as a pain shaker.
Cheers, Thomas Cleveland
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there are some previous postings on compressors made by "Jun Air", e.g., http://groups.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/browse_frm/thread/9b4cabc2fe5bca00/4b714d4a6ee90f66#4b714d4a6ee90f66
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I have a June air or maybe Junair compressor and I can't really hear it at all. It will run a nail gun but I don't use bigger tools. It is very quiet. I understand they are very expensive. This one was a gift from my boss. max

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