Do carbide scroll saw blades exist?


Is there such a thing as a carbide scroll saw blade?
I used my scroll saw to cut some composite board with fiberglass G10 on both sides and it killed a regular blade in no time. It is generally recommended to use carbide blades for this stuff.
A bandsaw would probably be better for this stuff than a scroll saw, but I don't have a bandsaw. With a bandsaw, the same inch of blade isn't used constantly.
Brian Elfert
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I couldn't tell you were to get them but I have seen carbide grit imbedded scroll saw blades. Ever think of what that stuff is doing to your saw?

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I doubt it is doing much to the saw as it has a blower that blows most of the dust away.
I don't cut much of this fiberglass composite board at all. I should probably hook up the dust collector so it will suck up as much as possible. I always use a good dust mask when machining this stuff.
Brian Elfert
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Brian Elfert wrote:

Remington makes them for sabre saws. Trade name is, IIRC, Tru-Grit. Used them to contour ceramic tile. Never seen them for scroll saws though.
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I've seen them for scroll and coping saws. Might have been in a model shop. Can't be sure.
writes:

imbedded
though.
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Brian:
If you search for carbide SS blades becomes hopeless:
Try http://www.mikesworkshop.com/ home of the Flying Dutchman blades, which IMHO are the best.
Mike's FD Polar blades just might come close to your needs, as they are very hard steel. Stick to larger sizes like a #7 or #9. But be aware this is not for thin stock as teeth per inch is low count. Slow you saw's strokes per minute down to under 1000 spm. and slow your feed rate down to match the spm. Mike is good people. Email him from his web page with your question, and my suggestion for Polar #9 blades. Mike just might know of a source where he could supply you with a better product to try.
Heat is the worst enemy of your cutting / blade life. Heat is caused by chips not being removed and causing friction. Don't trust just to your dust collection, get some air blowing / sucking on top also. You must remove the chips.
Please don't forget, that any sideways pressure on the blade will shorten the blade life significantly. Always cut such that so that at rest, the blade does not seek to move forward, or cut sideways.
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I agree his blades are the best I have used. I cut some lizzads from copper clad fiberglass (circuit board material). The cut was about 3 linear feet. I used 3 #5 blades. While blade life is not anywhere near what I get in wood at $.10 per blade it is not expensive unless you have a lot of cutting to do.
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