Disposing of water full of metal from sharpening on waterstones

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I'm fairly new to woodworking having recently built a pretty simple "built-in" CD/DVD shelf unit which turned out a lot better than I expected and got me interested in trying some more ambitious work.
Right now I'm trying to figure out what to do with the metal-filled water from sharpening with waterstones. I have a couple of pretty cheap chisels and planes that I tried to turn into something useful by lapping the backs until they approximated a mirror and then sharpening the bevel. I got a decent edge, although I definitely still need to work on my technique as they seemed to dull very quickly.
Anyway, when I was done (believe me, it took a long time), I was left with a container full of water and metal filings, which I can't decide what to do with. It doesn't seem like it would be good for the flowerbeds or the sewer system. I'm really curious what others do. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.
-- Keith
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You could allow the water to evaporate, then take the filings to a recycler... or if some of your trees need a shot of iron, water them with it. I just toss it to the mesquite by my shop. It's not chelated, but it can't hurt. It'll just rust away Tom Keith wrote:

Someday, it'll all be over....
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Keith, Your roses will love it.

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TeamCasa thus spake:

Gardenias are often iron deprived as well. Yellowing leaves in an otherwise healthy plant are a sign.
Greg G.
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Actually, your flower beds might be very interested in having them. Even plants need those trace elements and a fair amount of iron in their systems. One of the prettiest yards I've ever seen, the guy applied the dust from a brake lathe every so often.
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Come on folks, these are iron filings, not iron ions. Unless my chemistry is getting rusty (pun intended!) I think this is a big wive's tale.
Trace elements, such as in fertilizer, break into ions (Nitrogen, etc). That's what the plants can absorb.
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They tell you to stick a nail in the pot with African Violets so there must be something to adding iron. Perhaps the environment breaks iron into ion when the "R"ust comes out.
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Here's one more - the ionization state of iron makes a difference!

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On 21 Dec 2003 07:45:33 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) brought forth from the murky depths:

A lady friend tossed an old sack of nails under my favorite rose bush in Vista about 15 years ago and it started producing larger, prettier roses about a year later, and it stayed in bloom longer in those years. I disbelieved the tales until then.
Manmade iron parts DO break down into usable elements for plants.
========================================================= I drank WHAT? + http://www.diversify.com --Socrates + Web Application Programming
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Larry Jaques wrote:

You should see the weeds growing in the out door scrap pile. Must be good for plants. <g>
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Mark

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How long do you think a "filing" will remain intact when subjected to weather?

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Starting to get way off topic, but here's the formula for when iron rusts: (source: http://www.haverford.edu/educ/knight-booklet/mustitrust.htm )
4Fe + 3O2 = 2Fe2O3
You'll note that there are NO free iron ions. The iron combines with the oxygen. Nothing beside rust (2Fe2O3) is given off.
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Which explains why a piece of iron gains mass as it rusts...
djb
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But not what happens in the presence of other compounds.
wrote:

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Ask a chemist. AFAIK, iron react first with oxygen.
djb
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I live in iron country - none of what we mine is the oxide.
wrote:

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So iron can't react unless there is oxygen present?
Dave Balderstone wrote:

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Iron can't form iron oxide (rust) unless there is oxygen present.
Sheesh.
djb
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Larry Bud wrote:

I looked at the site and it doesn't provide much info and anyway it is for kids so they keep it real simple. However, the statement that vinegar is a strong acid is not correct and definitely should not be in the discussion. Vinegar (acetic acid) is a weak acid and should never have been picked as the acid to use in the experiment because it introduces complication that aren't stated. It was probably picked because it is familiar and safe. For one thing, you would have acetates of iron formed. And suggesting this is equivalent to acid rain, is hardly true. The composition of acid rain can be complex involving sulfur and nitrogen and phosphate compounds.
All of this has nothing to do with what iron does in soil. Soil is a very complicated system and the disintegration of iron is likely to involve various biotics. Some ferric and ferrous ions are likely to be free, but they will exist in a system where exhange among various molecules may be rapid or slow. But there will certainly be acetates, nitrates/nitrites, phosphates, sulfates/sulfites and a whole host of organics.
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On 22 Dec 2003 13:08:52 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote:

That's so simplistic it's verging on the Just Plain Wrong
(iron in water - just dump it - _anywhere_)
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