Disposing of refinishing products

Now that I'd refinished one of my cabinet doors, I'm wondering what to do with all the crap that will come off it when I remove the old varnish finish.
See I'm using CitrusStrip to remove the varnish and one thing that it creates is a lot of gelatanous goopy crap that you have to scrape off. But what do I do with that goop - toss it in the trash, store it in the sealed metal container, put it in a jar and call it a family heirloom? I'm at a loss for how to get rid of the by-products without ruining the environment, poisioning the groundwater, or poisoning myself for that matter. One I could handle, I wiped it up with a paper towel and tossed it in the trash, but not 10 or 12 - at least not without asking.
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Most of the citrus based products won't harm the environment by themselves. But when combined with the dissolved finishes that are still goopy they can be pretty poisonous to things.
I put mine in a bucket, mix it with sawdust, and the first really sunny day I spread it out on contractor bag to dry out in the hot sun. When it is hard and crunchy, I sweep it off and put it in the bag and put it out with the rest of the trash.
According to the guys I buy my really harsh stripper from, this is also a good way to get rid of their product. They key in both instances is to get the product stablilized and completely dry.
Robert
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Sun, May 6, 2007, 10:35pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@aol.com doth sayeth: <snip> I spread it out on contractor bag to dry <snip>
I've gotta ask. Contractor bag? You mean concrete, or what?
JOAT What is life without challenge and a constant stream of new humiliations? - Peter Egan
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     snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) writes:

I assumed he meant a thick-walled trash bag. They are commonly marketed as "contractor cleanup" bags.
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On May 7, 4:55 pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Well, the empty concrete bags are indeed used for utility purposes on occasion. But I buy these thick plastic bags (soemthing like 3 or 3.5 mil thick) that are made from a really tough plastic. They will hold about 30 lbs, sometimes more of debris.
They are marked "contractor cleanup bags" at the lumberyard. I think HD has them, too.
Robert
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wrote:

Thanks, that sounds like a reasonable approach.
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Eigenvector,

Contact your local recycling group. I'm sure they will have an answer.
MJ Wallace
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I don't know where you live, but many cities of any size have a hazardous waste drop off depot. I live in Houston and we have a model facility where you just drive through and unload whatever we need to - in and out in two minutes. They have workers wearing rubber gloves and protective gear to accept whatever concoction you bring in. Look up your city waste disposal number in the phone book and call them.
Bob
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Down the road in San Antonio.

1.3 million +

That woudl be nice! Nothing like that here, though.

Absolutely no need. We are presented with the opportunity 3 times a year for a full weekend (advertised in the newspaper and on TV) by the city to get rid of anything considered hazardous that wasn't used in a commercial venture.
So no heavy, 55 gallon drums of metal laden acids from the metal plating plant, etc. Anything else is OK.
Still, I always look for the easiest, safe way to do something. If I can SAFELY dispose of material myself, I will. And since a measured gallon of stripped "goo" is a lot in this context, I don't mind the extra steps for such a small amount of material.
The model facility would certainly be handy for old latex, primer, etc. However, San Antonio is encouraging us contractors to turn in the oil or solvent based products on hazmat disposal day (contractors pay a fee), but to simply dry out the latex products and dispose of the dried stuff container and all. Although they view their stance as ecouragement, actual failure to dispose of hazmats correctly will incur large fines, and if you are a "pro", some very large fines.
Robert
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So does that mean you scrape the goopy crap into a bucket - like a paint can and take that the waste disposal sites?
That seems like a reasonable approach. Is that how you handle it?

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Most of the stuff I've turned in was in buckets or plastic containers.
Bob
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Our area has a haz-mat weekend clean up that they advertise in advance for. One good way to stabilize and dry out the goo is to put it in a bucket and add kitty litter to it.
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wrote:

Oh I can do that - I have kitty little galore. Sounds like a plan - old paint can, kitty litter, haz mat guys.
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Eigenvector wrote:

Not to pick on the suggestor of the kitty litter, as it's a good one, but...
Why do we always specify "old" kitty litter, toothbrushes, panty hose...
My old toothbrushes are gross, used kitty litter stinks, and I don't wear panty hose (although I do have a hockey garter belt ;^0). None of that stuff is that expensive that I see a big deal in buying new when I really need it. <G>
Don't forget, Oil Dri is essentially the same stuff as kitty litter.
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