Disk sander from scratch


I have an AC motor used as the exhaust fan for a heat pump that I'd like to use to make a disk sander. The motor is 220 VAC, 1 Amp with a speed of (I think) 1750 RPMs. Problem #1 is that my small shop only has 110 VAC.
I've read somewhere that you can run a 220 motor off of 110. If true, how does that affect the current requirements and the running speed.
Also, I'll need a starter capacitor. I have the motor's instructions (not with me at the moment) but how do I determine the capacitor ratings for the lower input voltage?
Any help is greatly appreciated.
Mike
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If you have the motor instructions, they will tell you how to re-wire for 120V if it is possible. Most fan motors are shaded pole with very poor torque characteristics for what you are trying to do. Good luck! Bugs
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snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net wrote:

problem #2 is that a 1 amp fan motor is going to be underpowered by several orders of magnitude for that application.

there are power converters that can do that, but they'll cost more than the motor that you will actually need. now if that motor were 110/220 (very unlikely for a heat pump fan) it would be a matter of switching around a few wires.

<http://business.search.ebay.com/1-hp-motor_Business-Industrial_W0QQcatrefZC12QQcoactionZcompareQQcoentrypageZsearchQQcopagenumZ1QQfromZR10QQfsooZ1QQfsopZ1QQftrtZ1QQftrvZ1QQsacatZ12576QQsaprchiZQQsaprcloZ
or
<http://tinyurl.com/p89kc
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Well, I have my answer. I hooked up the motor to 110 last night (with supplied starter capacitor) and got a dismal response. It has so little torque on 110 that I could stop the motor by grabbing the shaft with my bare hands! Looks like I'll either have to find a 110 motor or buy a commercially available disk sander.
thanks for you input.
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Option #2: I also wanted a larger disc sander. Saw in Price Cutter Catalog a 10 " sanding plate that replaces the saw blade in a 10" table saw! Not wanting to mess up my table saw, checked frequently on Craigs List (or classified) and found a really cheap bench top 10 " saw for $25.00.Bought it and the Price Cutter adapter. With a little ingenuity, converted the fence with a 15" x 10" piece of scrap wood. Hooked up the sander plate, slid the board against it to make a safety cover. Then permanently mounted the board to the fence with screws.Cut a hole in the back of the saw to match my shop vac and now have a nice little "tabletop bench sander"! As the saw motor runs at 4800 rpm (PDF for a sander), I installed a HF Router speed controller and adjust speed to the job.I also added a homebrew small downdraft sanding table to the other side. The whole thing "ain't pretty", but for about $65.00, I have a neat little setup that works great. If Interested ,I can post pics at ABPW.
Bill

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Mike: Posted the series of pics at ABPW. If they came through!! Still using this set-up and works well for an inexpensive approach. Bill

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Yes, I've a table saw but don't really want to mess with a converter. At this point I've got 3 options: 1. buy a commercial disk sander, 2. buy a suitable motor and build one (my woodworking mags have a plan), 3. buy a cheap table-top saw and go the route suggested by you and Bill Hall (msg 5, above).
I'm glad you mentioned your experience with the drill attachment. Was wondering if my variable-speed 1/2" drill would have enough power and speed.
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