Dishwater Motor

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From newbe homeowner. I have a KitchenAid dishwasher, 8 years old. The motor has started whining alot. It can be easily heard from across the house.
Looks like the replacement cost for the motor is about $170 and replacement cost for the same model dishwasher is about $550.
Which is smarter in general, fix or replace?
To say on topic, I clean some of my woodworking tools in the dishwasher ; )
Thanks, Bill
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On 2/5/2011 8:33 PM, Bill wrote:

Hard to tell without seeing the general condition of the unit, but replacement at that age is generally not a bad move considering the cost, and probably increased efficiency, of a new one.
--
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Swingman wrote:

Thank you. Bill
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Another consideration should be whether or not the mfgr switched to a Chiwanese factory between then and now, and if that change affects (or completely does away with) the quality and longevity of the product.
I hadn't done enough research on my washer/dryer, so when I bought the "Made by Maytag" Magic Chef units, the washer motor blew within the first month and the dryer bearings were innately defective, an engineering problem which was not correctable.
-- Doubt 'til thou canst doubt no more...doubt is thought and thought is life. Systems which end doubt are devices for drugging thought. -- Albert Guerard
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You do what?!
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On 2/5/2011 8:33 PM, Bill wrote:

You may have a wood chip in the impeller. Some dis-assembly and inspection may be in order.
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Steve Barker
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"Bill" wrote:

8 years old tips the balance, time to replace.
Lew
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?

The machine should last another 8 years with a repair. Unless you have other issues, fix it. Be sure it is the motor and not some other component making the noise, such as pump or bearing someplace.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I'll try to double-check. The fact that the unit still basically operates suggested to me that the problem was probably a bad bearing. I assumed, perhaps incorrectly, that this would mean it would be necessary to replace the motor.
I owe it to my wallet to remove a few parts and take a closer look (If I can't locate a diagram online). If I don't find bearings I can replace, I'll replace the unit. For those that would be concerned, I'll turn the power off at the breaker.
Thank you, Bill
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.

Bill
There is lots of information online. Also the pump and associated parts frequently include a garbage disposal. Gtet a manual at your friendly appliance parts store. Also I am sure manuals are available from Kitchenaid.
Bob AZ
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Bob AZ wrote:

Just for fun, I just took off the "lower spray arm" hoping to find a bearing nearby (hint: it's not lefty-tighty, righty-lucy"). I just realized the problem is not likely to be there since:
Problem sound only occurs when that arm is spinning (with water) and the vibrations seems to be dominant in the left front (user's POV), but I could be off by a few inches. Will do my homework...
Bill
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?

That leads me away from the motor. Try running it with the arm removed and see if it is still making noise.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I should have added "bottom left front" (behind the lower access port). I watched a video that made the motor replacement look like quite the chore. They removed the dishwasher and turned it on it's back... Maybe it's more fun than it looks? -lol
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

Live & Learn.
After all you're not dealing with the Maytag man here.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Not sure what you mean--but I think your earlier suggestion to replace the darned thing seems like a reasonable suggestion, even a learned one.
Bill
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"Bill" wrote: --------------------------

You learn quick.<G>
Lew
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Some food for thought
Assume one hour per use, one use per day, 365 days per year, 8 years of service to date.
365(8) = 2920 hours of service to date.
My guess is that the design B-10 life (point at which 90% of units have not failed) is somewhere around 5,000 hours. (It may be a lot less)
B-10 is a statistics term often used as a design life point, IOW, the unit has consumed approximately 60% of it trouble free service life.
As a recent homeowner, you have yet to learn about the slippery slope of increasing repairs you face with household appliances as they age.
Clothes washers, clothes driers, and dish washers are the worst followed by microwaves.
Stoves and refrigerators (Ice maker excluded) tend to have a much longer service life.
Having to pull the appliance out of a cubby hole to gain access to the innards, all the time making sure you don't plow a groove in the floor covering gets your juices flowing, especially at 10:00PM on a work night.
Then realizing that you don't have the special tool the repairman has to get at a special screw in order to make the repair, frustrated you ask yourself, "How the F**K do I get out of this mess?"
You have two choices, go down the road above or wisely avoid the trap.
DAMHIKT
There was a time in my life when the only things I would not try were brain surgery and laying concrete, but I'm learning, the list is longer these days.
Lew
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Failures, on the other hand, can be VERY easy to repair; the RCA S-100 module-swap televisions had 60% good modules returned for 'rebuild' service, meaning that RESEATING THE CONNECTOR was all that most repairs ever required. The noise in this case possibly isn't the (single moving part) motor/rotor assembly at all (it'd squeak, or leak, or hum, but unless something's out of balance, not vibrate). It could even be water hammer (i.e. in the pipes, not related to the dishwasher at all).
Dishwashers, and Skilsaws (note WW content!), are 'durable goods' and well worth repair.
Reduce, reuse, recycle.
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?

You may find the pump and/or solenoid valve in that area. I think you need more troubleshooting before taking the motor out.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I believe in my unit that the pump and the main motor are sold as a single module/assembly. Given the "whining" that occurs (not my whining), I'm not sure there's much left to consider. Does the solenoid valve do anything that could cause a lot of noise?
Bill
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