Disc Sander Question

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On a bench top sander??? Table does tilt but does not elevate or lower so that the dirrection of disk never gets close to the grain dirrection. On a TS that is a different matter.
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On 3/28/2011 2:51 PM, Leon wrote:

If the point is simply to straighten the edge for jointing, doesn't matter (assuming you're not use 40-grit chunk o' rock paper, anyway). Any fine scratches won't harm the glue joint at all.
Or, as Larry suggests, set it up instead of on the center edge to use the top edge in a (nearly) parallel direction if you prefer and the scuff pattern will be w/ longways.
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I think we are still talking about the OP's bench top disk sander, Not all jointed edges are used for a glue joint. Jointed edges are often the exposed edge.

I have never seen a bench top disk sander capable of raising or lowering the table, only tilt.
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Correct. http://www.shopsmith.com/ownersite/catalog/sn_conical_sanding.htm
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On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 14:32:06 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
In their dreams. Move along, nothing to see here.
-- If the only prayer you ever say in your whole life is "thank you," that would suffice. -- Meister Eckhart
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Have not heard that unit of measure used for about 40 years! Glad there are still folks around who know the true measure of tolerance!
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In wrote:

another option if you truly need it flat is to take the disc to a machine shop and have them machine it flat. It should mill easily, since I'm assuming the plate is aluminum
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On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 12:28:31 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

"It's all in how you use the tool."

Yabbut, first you have to talk the HF knuckledraggers to bring them all down to you to check.

It might not, but the more expensive tools get closer scrutiny at all the Red Dragon Noodle and Machine Tool factories, don'tchaknow?

I hoped against hope that wasn't the case.

What does the Japanese translator for the Chinglish translated booklet say about this parameter?
If it's not, get a set of carbide lathe tools and a lathe manual so you can learn how to turn down the center to flat. ;)

-- If the only prayer you ever say in your whole life is "thank you," that would suffice. -- Meister Eckhart
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wrote:

That's it, just turn it down in place! Imagine it's a bowl lathe ....
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wrote:

No wobble at all. I would have already returned it if it did.

Now I'm really confused. Some say that it's a beveled disk and can be used as a joiner, you say it's an issue if I try to use it to flatten a surface. Isn't a joiner used to flatten a surface (edge) for gluing?

A fine suggestion, if I feel like taking the plastic straps off the boxes, cutting the packing tape, removing the packing foam, lifting the units out of their boxes and taking them out of the plastic bag. Then, after checking each disk - 'cuz I'm a nice guy - reversing the whole process and packing them all up again. ;-)

Why would switching to a 12" model ensure that I would get a flat disc?
A stationary disk sander is not used to straighten anything but small stock. AND it sands against the grain. It should be use to shape curves. A 12" model will shape faster.
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You may find the 12" sanding disks easier to find in stores.
Also the conical surface may be difficult to stick flat sanding disk onto without wrinkles. ---------------
Why would switching to a 12" model ensure that I would get a flat disc?
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At least for now, HF carries 10" discs in multi packs:
http://www.harborfreight.com/5-piece-10-inch-cloth-backed-psa-sanding-disc-set-3727.html

I haven't tried attaching a sheet on my own, but the 80 grit that came installed on the unit is perfectly flat.
We'll see.

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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Sudden thought: Is the back of the plate flat?
--

dadiOH
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Dunno. The back of the plate is covered by the housing of the unit.
http://www.harborfreight.com/10-inch-bench-top-disc-sander-47404.html
That blue "ring" around the disk extends in a bowl-like manner down to the motor housing, where it appears to be welded right to the motor housing, so the back of the plate is not accessible .
There may be a bolt under the sandpaper itself that allows the plate to be removed, but if so, I think I'd have to remove the table and dust collection housing before the disk could be removed. Not sure, but I'm not into tearing the unit apart right now.
Maybe if I decide to return it, I'll take it apart just before I do. <g>
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

I asked because I thought your plate might have one cone side, one flat and could be reversed. Why they would make it that way for a disc sander, I have no idea. The plate is being driven directly by the motor so I suspect it is held on to the motor shaft by a nut.
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