Dining room table -

I've just ordered some 6/4 walnut from Steve Wall in the hopes of embarking on my most challenging project to date. Then again - the challenge may be one more of understanding than anything. My father's VN shadowbox is done, and my wife keeps asking about her dining room table...
The "design requirements" are these: - Family of four - Pretty small dining area w/ attached kitchen. - Round table w/ pedestal - the more "petite" (read "thin"), the better. - Walnut
Easy yea? - Buy a walnut pedestal (only vendor I could find was Adams). - Build a walnut blank, cut a circle and attach.
Here's where I get scared... Having a 44" table top w/ no expansion (narrow pedestal) worries me a bit. Was thinking of splitting the table, w/ a narrow pedestal on each side (Adams small traditional pedestal in walnut w/ 3 legs) butted (or nearly) together (with a leg out where they meet) - and a 18" or so leaf.
Expansion table idea scares me - but plenty of articles are available. Asthetics of thin pedestals with the table "closed" scares me. Leaf on a round table scares me.
Book recommendations, tips, advice, pictures of such tables, criticism, etc - is all welcome...
Thanks -
jbd
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I would do a poplar version no matter the design before I committed that much walnut.
I would also look into "several" designs before I committed to a pedestal base.
"Petite" and pedestal base don't seem to go together.
http://www.tablelegs.com/BaseKits/DiningTableBaseKits/RoundHepplewhiteDiningTableBaseKits.aspx
jbd in Denver wrote:

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Mon, Dec 3, 2007, 9:50pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net (PatBarber) doth sayeth: I would do a poplar version no matter the design before I committed that much walnut. I would also look into "several" designs before I committed to a pedestal base. "Petite" and pedestal base don't seem to go together. <snip>
Prototype definitely. I think a lot of details were left out too. First it's a round table, then extension is mentioned. Didn't see how large the top is expected to be. I would think it would have to be pretty fair size to accommodate four people. Personally I'd want a very sturdy pedestal, with lots of support - someone is bound to lean on it. Actually I'd probably make a trestle table instead. Go visit your local library, and do your homework. You want round tops, with thin pedestals, make four individual tables.
JOAT Even Popeye didn't eat his spinach until he had to.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote in 3331.bay.webtv.net:
<You want round tops, with thin pedestals, make four individual tables.>
All of it good advice - thanks.
And also appreciated (with a chuckle) the blunt instrument approach to a reality check!
jbd
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After serious thinking jbd in Denver wrote :
( snip)

I'd ask over in the rec, you might get more replies as some of them can't get binary groups like this.
Mekon
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Maybe this book? http://store.taunton.com/onlinestore/item/070609.html I haven't read it but looks like it is on the subject.
When I think of the design challenge you propose the following comes to mind.
1. Build an expandable table that has a rectangular leaf that can be inserted to make your round table into a longer table with rounded ends when you need it.
2. Now you have a classic and well thought out design concept that provides for 2 semi circle halves and a standard atachment that takes care of all the wood expansion problems. Books like the one mentioned can provide the details.
3. If you use classic techniques you will have a bent apron, slats under the table top that are part of the leaf\expansion system that also manage the attachment to the pedestal and the table top.
4. You can buy leaf extension hardware from several locations and it will come with instructions about attachment to the pedestal, top, etc.
5. Even if you don't need it now, build the leaf so you can match the finish and material exactly now, rather than later.
Here are some suggestions for the round top (which will be split to make the two halves.)
1. Make sure the glue-up has one wide board centered near the center, so when you split the table you aren't cutting near or down a glue line and you'll have a nice mathing effect when the table is in the round configuration.
2. Cut a piece of MDF to the exact round sive using a router trammel or other precise method. Then trace that round on the solid wood glue- up, cut close to the line with a band or jig saw. Then use a pattern \trim bit on a routerand the MDF template to finish cutting the solid wood round.
3. For a more petite (thin) look for the table top, chamfer the underside of the table top edge. If you make the edge maybe 3/8" thick and an un-equal chamfer back at least an inch or so the top will look really thin. I have also used panel raising bits and put a nice smooth curved cut-away on the underside. Faking a thin edge by undercutting it like is super effective and really lightens the look of pieces. I use it on shelf edges and tops all the time.
Fine Wood Working mag had a pedestal table with a 3 foot base maybe a year ago detailed all the attachment techniques. It didn't have an expanding table top (I fdon't think) here are the plans. http://store.taunton.com/onlinestore/item/011053.html
BW
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Tale a look at www.tablelegs.com , Matthew Burak shows at least two round tables.

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