dimensioned lumber

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wrote:

ACQ is pretty benign. Unless you're buying stuff for underground or water contact use, it will likely be ACQ. I don't think CCA (the stuff with arsenic) isn't sold to homeowners anymore.

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Yes, moisture. You will find dry ones measure more in the range of 1.5 x 3.5 but that is not a guarantee either.
I have found 2x4 here that are actually 2 1/4 by 4 plus....of course those are old millings. It is very difficult when repairing a redwood deck, and doing in line repairs if the 2x6 are 1.5 x 5.5 and the purchased repair is 1 5/8 x 5 5/8 Of course one can rip, although as they dry they shrink.....
I have received deliveries with 2 different millings in the single delivery.... And had to sort out the different size as to not affect the deck spacing.... john
"dadiOH" wrote in message
Maybe 2x4s were once actually 2" x 4", don't know, best I remember is 1 5/8" x 3 5/8". They were that way for many years, then went down to 1 1/2" x 3 1/2". That's OK, no problem but - apparently - pressure treated 2x4s are still 1 5/8" x 3 5/8". At least the ones I just bought and chopped down to size yesterday are (I'm making some cabinet plinths).
Now, 1/8" isn't all that much but it's enough to screw up my plans for the rest of the cabinets which means I either have to revise the plans or skinny down the PT. I'll do the latter but I sure wish they would decide what size 2x4s should be, PT or not.
I guess I should ask a question, not just rant, so I will: Is there some reason PT 2x4s are bigger?
--

dadiOH
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2x4 is the rough-sawn size. Our previous house was a 1928 farmhouse framed with rough-sawn lumber: the wall studs were actually 2 inches by 4 inches, floor joists a full 2x8, etc.
The main advantage of dressing rough-sawn framing lumber is to provide consistent dimensions: the actual size of the rough-sawn material varied +/- about 1/8".
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On 2/8/15 8:39 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

2x4 finished dimensions have changed over the years. IIRC the current 1.5x3.5 size has been the standard since the late 60s.
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-MIKE-

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On Sun, 08 Feb 2015 10:52:12 -0600, -MIKE- wrote:

Not sure about the dating, but I seem to remember 1.75 x 3.75 way back when. Of course that may have been recycled or old stock or a faulty memory. Anyone else remember that size?
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On 2/8/15 12:03 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

I read something a while back about the history of dimensional lumber. It kept decreasing in size every so often, so your recollection is probably accurate. You have to keep in mind, too, that these giant lumber yard/home stores in every town and every major interstate interchange is a very modern phenomenon.
Even in the 70s it was much easier people in some parts of the country to get their lumber straight from a sawyer. There are many homes built in the early 70s with 2x4s that are very close to nominal size.
--

-MIKE-

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On 2/8/2015 1:13 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I had a friend that had a home built in the 20's in Houston. The studs were not only larger that today's studs they were oak. I would hot have believed it has I not seen it. He was doing some restoring and had a wall opened up.
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rough-sawn

Possibly I didn't state my point as clearly as I intended -- which was that, regardless of the actual finished dimension, when you're building a house from two-by lumber that has been finished, it's all been finished to the *same* dimension: all the 2x4s are the same size, all the 2x8s are the same size *and* they're the same thickness as the 2x4s, etc.
In a house built with rough lumber, most of the 2x4s are actually pretty close to 2" x 4", but some of them may be 1 7/8 x 4, some may be 2 1/8 x 3 15/16, etc.
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On 2/8/2015 9:05 AM, dadiOH wrote:

I would think since they are wet, they are 1/8 larger, and will shrink once they dry.
Are these for inside? or outside?
--
Jeff

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