Difficult fastening techniques.

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<snippage>

I LOVE how a problem is generally solved either with epoxy or Fred Bingham's Practical Yacht Joinery. ;-)
Someday, I'm going to get some epoxy.
Already bought the book. Used, of course.
Thanks, Lew.
Patriarch
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"Patriarch" wrote:

Don't let the gates of Hell rust shut first though<G>.

Question is, "Do you use it?"<G>
I'm reminded of the old one about rules.
Rule 1: Epoxy and Fred Bingham's book rule.
Rule 2: If in doubt, refer to rule 1.
Lew
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Ever make a round nut?
I once had a requirement to conceal about 20 nuts in a 2" thick slab of wood so that bolts could be put in and taken out multiple times. There was also a need for this slab to be as heavy as possible - it was the base of a project that needed a low center of gravity. Here's what I did.
I cut 3/4" steel rod into 1" lengths using metal cutting blades in a 10" miter saw and then drilled and tapped each "nut" to accept the bolts.
I used a 1 1/2" forstner bit to drill 1 1/4" deep holes in the wood and also drilled a hole sized for the bolts all the way through the wood.
I roughed up the outside of each nut, coated the threads with Vaseline, dropped one into each hole and threaded a bolt through the wood to hold it in place.
I then poured epoxy around the nut and let it set over night. Since epoxy won't stick to anything coated with Vaseline, the bolts just spun right out and the nuts were permanently embedded in the wood.
Since the nuts were actually about 20" of 3/4" steel rod, they also added the extra weight required.
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Lee Michaels wrote:

You got that right.
I've got tons of jigs with parts obtained from plumbing, electrical, solid surface counter top, home organization, automotive, etc... suppliers.
Lots of woodworkers build store fixtures and trade show displays on occasion, where strange hardware can help create a truly unique and useful item.
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wrote:

Do you prefer these to the other methods for attaching SS sinks to solid surface?
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Bar none. Put a nice blob of SS adhesive on the perforations and softly squish the goop through the little holes, as you place the thing where you want it, forming little mushroom-like rivets. Carefult not to push too hard, as the adhesive will squish out from under the perforated plate. I use the 1-1/2" ones with the 1" studs... usually about 10-12 per double sink. Never had one fail yet.
I take a lot of hints from the composite industry. They have some cool MixPac adhesives. These guys are pretty cool; http://www.integra-adhesives.com
YES!!! ANOTHER SPAM!!!! MORE MONEY FOR MEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE *diabolical laughter*
r
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wrote:

Do you use a "composite" adhesive or the same adhesive you use for fabricating the solid surface to attach the flanged studs?
Frank
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I mostly use regular SS adhesive. The suggested composite adhesive doesn't appear to be working any better. I do touch the flanges to my disc sander, to rough them up a bit on the bottom, then I diligently clean them with methyl hydrate.
I also use a GE silicone (to attach the sink flange), formulated for flashings and metals...now THAT stuff makes a difference.
r
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wrote:

Thanks, helpful.
Frank
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I appreciate learning about the specialty fasteners. Indeed would have liked to have learned about pricing, ordering, minimum quantities and so forth.
I appreciate the "spam in sheep's clothing" comment as well and can understand whence it came.
I do not appreciate you response and specifically the language employed to defend yourself (which was unnecessary, by the way).
That you incited som others to respond in kind demonstrates what a fragile thing "Society" is - and to our shame as well.
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Google is your friend.

We all have different ways to express ourselves when we're pissed off. When I express myself, I don't pretend to be anything I'm not. I loathe spammers. To be called one, gets a reaction. An honest reaction and not some holier-than-thou Falwell approved version of a reaction. Language allows us to communicate in ways strong enough to convey displeasure as well as pleasure. My choice of vocabulary is at my option, not yours.

Man, you need to lighten up. Try to focus on those who use your approved language and still manage to send thousands to their deaths based on lies.
r
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