Dial indicator with magnetic base

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wrote:

No, no, no. Use your Feztool Dremel-like companion tool.
-- The most powerful factors in the world are clear ideas in the minds of energetic men of good will. -- J. Arthur Thomson
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Systimatic ATBR 50 tooth blade does fine. For more critical luthiery work, I'll touch up the joints with a #5 or an LN block. Haven't seen a jointer yet that can produce as smooth or as flat a surface.
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Father Haskell wrote:

Thanks for starting me on a saw blade/tooth lesson. I never did figure out what ATBR stands for, for I learned it should produce good on crosscut-miter cuts. Does this apply to ripping too? I know ripping and crosscut saws are completely different.
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Bill wrote:

I should have wrote I know ripping and crosscut *blades* are different. And I know they have combination blades. Roland Johnson of FWW said, at the WoodworkingShows, that one should never use those. : ) My concern is academic, since I'm going to get my planes in shape, but I'm still interested in learning what I can about blades.
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On 1/26/2012 5:31 PM, Bill wrote:

If that is what Roland Johnson said he is ignorant.
I used S0 tooth Systematic ATBR Combination blade for years with good results. I have been using a general purpose 40 tooth Forrest WWII for 12 years with GREAT results. Both blades for Both ripping, cross cutting, and compound miters.

You will not be disappointed in a General purpose Forrest WWII 40 tooth blade.
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On 1/27/2012 10:34 AM, Leon wrote:

To be fair, what he said is that "one should only rip with ripping blades, only crosscut with cross-cutting blades, and *avoid* the combination blades--it doesn't take that long to change blades."
I did order the dial indicator magnetic base system for setup and testing, like he recommended. Grizzly got the sale.

Thank you, that is my impression from what I've read around here, by you and others, and I'm sure I'll get one.
I'm looking forward to rasping out a strop this weekend. I looked at a table that indicated Maple wasn't as much harder than White Oak or Red Oak as I thought it was, so I'll pick up a 1by2 of oak tonight. I'm embracing the challenge of try to rasp out one that shows craftsmanship. It should be good practice. Fortunately, the 1x2 is sold in a 6' length--so I can make several, if necessary, to achieve this! ; )
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On 1/27/2012 10:34 AM, Bill wrote:

Yeah if you are relatively inexpensive blades and yo have time to kill changing blades. I would have to change blades 8~10 time daily. THAT is why I switched to a top quality combo/general purpose blade. It is highly unlike you would notice an appreciable difference.

That's good, helps to rule out possible problems and set thing up.

Enjoy!
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I use the Forrest WWII the vast majority of the time for just that reason... However, when I've got a lot of ripping of solid 6/4-12/4 planed wood to do I swap over to a Freud, coated, rip blade. It makes for much faster and easier cuts on long rips. This as the tooth shape and large gullet size allow it to take big bites and carry the dust away. I think the latter makes the most difference as even with my 3 HP saw the WWII requires a slower feed than the rip blade as it cannot handle the waste of thick stock.
I've noticed in more recent times that I find myself cutting things like 8/4 maple or cherry on the 18" bandsaw whether it's planed or rough cut. Rough cut 4/4 or 5/4 is always ripped, and cross-cut if possible, on the bandsaw when rough sizing boards.
I realize that not everyone has all these options though... I never ran out of reasons for another tool purchase. ;~)
John
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On 1/26/2012 5:31 PM, Bill wrote: ...

...
Well, what was he hawking then?
<http://www.finewoodworking.com/ToolGuide/ToolGuideProduct.aspx?id3825>
Or, more likely and to give the benefit of doubt, what _specifically_ was he speaking of in context of that "never"?
--
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dpb wrote:

He said, everyone with a TS needed a magnetic base dial indicator--so i ordered one with hope of getting a TS soon. : ) I ordered the base recommended here with the flexible "neck" (G9625) from Grizzly. Looking forward to use it to measure runout on my DP, and I'll be ready if a new TS should appear this year.

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"Bill" wrote in message
Anyone out there making furniture with no power jointer? ============================================= Yep.
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On 1/23/2012 6:08 PM, Bill wrote:

Anyone out there making

Yes, I had a jointer for years. I actually used it to take up space and collect dust. I got rid of it a few years ago and have not missed it at all.
Now if I were buying a lot of rough cut lumber I would want it back but S2S lumber for me is just not expensive enough for me to want to go back to using a jointer and buying rough cut. I do however straighten S2S lumber with my track saw.
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Leon wrote:

I like your technique of "jointing" the edges with a track or table saw.
But if you were to set a couple of your new S2S boards side-by-side, it would not make for a flat surface, would it (just asking)?
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On 1/29/2012 3:20 PM, Bill wrote:

Yes they would. S2S boards have the top and bottom surfaces planed flat. There will be exceptions just like with some S4S which may no longer be flat or straight. For the most part S2S will be consistent thickness but will be thinker that the size that it is sold as. Most often 4/4 S2S is 13/16" thick at my supplier so I plane it to the desired thickness, usually 3/4".
Keep in mind it is more difficult to straighten an edge on a TS unless you use a sled, which I used to do. The rip fence is not long enough to address keeping the stock going in a straight line for longer boards. The track saw works much better in this case.
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Leon, I stopped using surfaced wood as it was never flat, always twisted. Where do you find this wonderful flat 2s wood?
I joint because it's a lot easier to have squared up wood from my process, than picking through tons of lumber. I rarely see straight wood. So when I get rough cut wood I just expect to true it up. I find building with that wood easier. I don't have to deal with twists, which for already surfaced wood means I need to knock it down in thickness, or rip it and fix smaller strips and then glue them back.
Same amount of work and time? No. truer, and faster.
On 1/29/2012 6:35 PM, Leon wrote:

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On 1/29/2012 6:40 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

We have at least four good hardwood places that let you pick and chose here in Houston, so, if you can read a board, you can reasonably come home with what you pay for.
The problem I find is when I phone order so many board/linear feet for pick up, from the same places ... then I damn well better factor at least 20% for waste.
--
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On 1/29/2012 8:07 PM, Swingman wrote:

I can assure you that if you call in an order to be pulled at Hardwood Products it will be pulled as it comes off the stack. I imagine that is how they get rid of the questionable stuff with knots and tapered ends. As you pointed out you do need to pick your own stick to get exactly what you want.
More and more for paying jobs I am turning to S4S. I am more consistantly not have to over buy as I know going in exactly how much I need to buy. Dealing with S2S you never know how much taper the boards will have and there tends to be quite a bit of waste when you remove the taper.
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On 1/29/2012 6:40 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

Hardwood Products, Clarks Lumber AKA Hardwood Lumber to name the 2 that I use the most. Both in Houston. IIRC both suppliers mill their own S2S and S4S lumber.

And oddly we/I have to look to find rough cut lumber of any quantity, I do have a source some 80 miles away however that absolutely wipes out any savings.

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Leon wrote:

I think I brought home a 9' exception the other day. It looked pretty good laying on its face in the store. But resting on an edge both ends curve up. I'm going to cut it up anyway, so it will do fine. It was nice to see these hardwoods at Menards though--Lowes only had Red Oak. I'm sure when I pursue a furniture project, that I'll seek out a lumberyard. I need to keep learning before I go so that I don't look like a greenhorn! I had the whole lumber department to myself at Menards. No SS's to keep a 12 foot beam of maple falling on me either! ; )
For the most part S2S will be consistent thickness but

Good point. I didn't think of that. Thanks for the lesson! If there's a theme here, it seems to be "be concerned about everything that can go wrong".
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On 1/29/2012 8:39 PM, Bill wrote:

Good catch there, the better your stock is to begin with the fewer the little inconsistencies show up later to a greater magnitude.
Keep in mind that hardwoods that are sold at the big box stores tend to be 2 to 3 tomes more expensive than a hardwood lumber yard that has a much larger volume of hardwood sales. Smaller hardwood "boutiques" tend to be pretty pricey also.
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