Diablo blades for table saw

I got a freud diablo blade for my circular saw and was really surprised at how good the blade is. I am considering a diablo for my table saw but wanted to know if anyone's using one here. Do you like it? If it is half as nice as it is on my circular saw I'd be fine with that and even better if it's as good.
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On 11/27/14, 5:57 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

I may be wrong but I don't think they make any full kerf blades for the table saw, under the Diablo brand. I would never use a thin kerf blade on a table saw, though they may be required for the lower powered portables.
Having said that, I have used several Freud table saw and miter saw full kerf blade and they have all performed with excellence.
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On 11/27/2014 7:05 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Hum.
I have a thin kerf Diablo blade on my cross Cut table. I wouldn't call it a wood working saw, it does wood work. It is a good blade when cutting a lot of wood. Especially valuable wood. The force needed and back into the blade is reduced as well. Mine has cut hundreds of feet of ply and hardwood. Shure beats the heck out of my 80 tooth.
Martin
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On 11/27/2014 8:05 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I used a Diablo with decent results. However, if you are serious about good cuts you'll have a Ridge Carbide, Forrest Infinity, etc. The Diablo, IMO, is far superior to the $10 Sears blade, but not up to the others
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On 11/27/14, 11:00 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

Everyone's mileage varies, obviously. I just find thin kerf blades bend too much to be as accurate as I like. I have one to cut bamboo with which I have to use a stabilizer, but besides that, I hate them.
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I always use the Harbor Freight 50 tooth, for two simple reasons. The cut is very good, both rip and crosscut and its one fifth to a sixth the price of the Forrest WWII. I just resharpened one on the HF saw blade sharpener and it cuts even smoother.
That being said, yes, the carbide does wear rather quickly. Yes, the carbide is smaller than on the Forrest. Yes,you can probably only get one resharpening from it. But for the hobbyist, its hard to justify the Forrest.
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On 11/28/2014 8:54 AM, Dr. Deb wrote:

Not for me. I have a Ridge Carbide, about the same price and quality. It has not needed resharpening yet, makes smooth accurate cuts. Even a hobbyist can want perfection.
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On 11/28/2014 7:54 AM, Dr. Deb wrote:

On the flip side of that coin, if the TS is decent, the Forrest might be the only blade that you ever need to buy and will certainly last for decades with a sharpening thrown in every 5~10 years.
I build a lot, probably not considered a hobbiest, 23+ pieces of furniture and more than 100 drawers in the last 4 years. All done with a single Forrest blade with out being resharpened. I bought my first Forrest blade in 1999 and still use it today. I have 3 total WWII40 tooth regular kerf blades. 2 that I swap out every 4~5 years to be resharpened and one for cutting flat bottom groves.
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On Thu, 27 Nov 2014 15:57:54 -0800, Electric Comet wrote:

I bought one after we moved and I hadn't yet found my blade collection. I too was surprised at how well it cut. Not as good as my Freud rip and crosscut blades, but quite good for a combination blade.
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On Thu, 27 Nov 2014 19:05:29 -0600

That reminds me, I will try one on my miter saw too. Will also have a look at the other brands. The difference on my skilsaw was huge so I compared blades and I think the secret isn't due to the thin kerf but due to the little wiggly cuts in the blade face. Probably the coating contributes as well.
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On Thu, 27 Nov 2014 23:00:39 -0600

Good info.
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On 11/28/14, 12:30 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

When I was cutting bamboo plywood for my bathroom cabinets, I went through a bunch of blades trying to find one that wouldn't splinter the bamboo (craziest, most difficult stuff I've ever worked with cross cutting.) http://goo.gl/jYNpg0
After trying several different blades, I landed on this one. <http://www.lowes.com/pd_46638-281-1807370_0__?productId712076> I have suspicions that it's made in Freud's factory in Italy. It is thin kerf so I used stabilizers which yielded exceptional results. The teeth are at very radical offset angles making very sharp needle points on their leading edge corners.
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On 11/27/2014 5:57 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

What kind of TS are you mounting this blade to? This blade may be fine for an inexpensive saw, if you have a "good" saw I recommend Forrest brand, and no think kerf blades for a good saw with enough power to not stall.
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On Sat, 29 Nov 2014 14:23:18 -0600

Will check out that one too.
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