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I remember when Made in America meant a standard of quality. . Now it simply means where it is built.
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Assembled
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

them back.

I've got a question for you. How would YOU write an "honest label" for a Dewalt power tool that made it absolutely crystal clear that (a) it was an 18v tool and (b) there was no way to make the tool run in any useful manner on the batteries made for the previous series of 18v dewalt tools.
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Ummmmm, 18 volt Lithium Ion
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And just one more thing, there is no reason that an 18 volt battery of a different chemical make up should not work. Festool allows you to use any same shape battery, equal or lower voltage battery, or different chemical make up battery in their cordless tools. Their Li-ion charger will charge any same shape, regardless of chemical make up, battery.
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Any same shape battery. Not different shape.
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On 8/20/2015 7:13 AM, Leon wrote:

+1 THAT'S NO BULLSHIT LABELING.
I think the fact that they did not represent NICAD on their 18v was deceptive too.
--
Jeff

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In article <174200608461761953.378665lcb11211-

And how does that distinguish from the 18v lithium ion DeWalt tools that do not take the same battery?
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On 8/20/2015 4:44 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

What should it matter? You tool does not know what chemical make up of the battery is nor does it matter.
And if the voltage is slightly different that does not matter either.
At this is all true with well designed tools.
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Smart motor controller not a dumb one. One that provides 2 or 3 voltages for the circuits and a master branch for the motor.
New designs require new batteries.
Martin
On 8/20/2015 6:13 AM, Leon wrote:

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On 8/20/2015 9:21 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

Maybe, voltage to the motor is not as touchy as one might expect. Although I am sure the "smart" part is how the charger deals with different voltages and types of batteries. The Festool charger basically will charge any battery that will fit, regardless of voltage or chemical make up.
Many Many years ago ,1979ish, I worked for a GM dealership and for specific reasons did my best to burn out a "defective" 12 volt window regulator motor, the motor that raises and lowers the window.
I hooded it up to two brand new 12 volt batteries and the result was that the motor ran faster. Long story short I had the voltage up to 72 volts, 5 batteries, and the motor screamed for 1 minute and I gave up. I was unable to burn the motor up to that point
I seriously doubt if any power tool would reject being powered by as much as double voltage. I could be wrong, there could actually be, as you said, smart circuitry, that would prevent a consumer from doing this. Again referring to Festool, their drills will work with any battery that will fit regardless of chemical make up, there are two extremely different styles and there is no mistaking one for the other, as long as the voltage is equal to or less than the stated rating for the tool. This is my charger,
http://festoolusa.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/batteries-and-chargers/battery-charger-tcl-3-499412

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"Leon" wrote:

------------------------------------------- During the mid sixties, I worked for a company that manufacturied electric motors for antennas, windows, etc.
We referred to these motors as powered guiltiness.
Part of the spec from the OEM was that the battery fail before the battery.
Fires were another part of the spec. Didn't the door panel catching on fire if the motor locked up.
Lew
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On 8/20/2015 10:28 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

which failed before which? ;~)
If the regulator motor locked up a fuse should have blown and or a breaker tripped.
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"Leon" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------- The battery had to fail by definition.
No circuit protective devices were allowed.
You should have seen the test to distruction when a large cranking motor for a large Cummins was bolted down in a large bench vice cranking locking the roter and stator together.
A pair of 8D batteries were connected to the cranked motor via a 400 amp knife switch that was nailed to the the floor.
The weldinq cable was doing a St. Vitas dance while the test was in progress.
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I bet that was pretty interesting. Did the motor glow red? I have seen the old style aluminum jumper cables dance when jumping a vehicle. Funny and scary. Copper jumping is another story.
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"Leon" wrote:

--------------------------------------------------------- You will have to define "glow red", but there was lots of smoke and stink.
The cool down was over night as I remember.
You are talking about 4/0 CU welding cable.
Remember this is the 1960's.
Lew
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When I was in school, the college got some stuff from a big company.
There was a really neat spot welder in the stuff. Bunch of Solid state stuff. But the spot welder was legend in the department.
When turned on - it was RF power dumping in the copper stranded cables that were 1" in diameter and soft, soft copper. When the tips arc's melting a spot - the cables would dance about the table. We saw they were once bolted down and that is what we did. One fear was for the cables (bare wire) to bounce into each other. Just short of doing it, but heat expands metal. That was cool.
Martin
On 8/21/2015 7:13 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

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says...

It's my understanding that in deWalt's case the change was mostly driven by a desire to move the protective circuits from the battery to the tool and charger to allow a cheaper battery. They took the opportunity to redesign the battery to a more convenient shape in the process. And apparently they've standardized it across deWalt, Black and Decker, and Porter-Cable.

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On Thu, 20 Aug 2015 21:21:27 -0500, Martin Eastburn

I would agree about the chargers but unless the protection circuits are in the tool (rather than the battery pack) there is no reason a the packs couldn't be made interchangeable. It would be a simple matter to make the form factor enough different that people wouldn't be tempted to use the wrong one anyway.

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On 8/20/2015 9:49 PM, krw wrote:

I doubt that Li-Ion batteries will come with out protection circuitry. This circuitry communicates with the smart charger during recharge so that the charger does not damage the Li-Ion charger.
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