DeWalt News

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DeWALT Focuses on “Made in the USA”
DeWALT’s 1.2-million square foot facility that straddles the North/South Carolina border is now not only a distribution center, but also DeWALT’s fully functional Charlotte Manufacturing Operation, creating more than 350 new jobs.
Craig Zielinski, director of manufacturing, says DeWALT has determined that it now can make cordless power tools affordably and well here in America. Plus, end users want American-made tools.
Certain components of the tools are “globally sourced,” because, Zielinski says, there simply aren’t stateside suppliers with the expertise for everything these days.
DeWALT currently maintains manufacturing facilities in six states, with components and accessories coming from three states. Since opening the Charlotte assembly plant, aka “Project Eagle,” the company has launched Project Eagle II, to add cordless tool manufacturing in Greenfield, Indiana. All told, DeWALT employs approximately 1,800 people stateside. — Chris Marsha
*Tools produced at the Charlotte facility include variations of 18-volt tools and 20V MAX* hammer drills, drill/drivers, impact drivers and recip saws.
**DeWALT’s Charlotte facility has assembled 4 million cordless tools, built 2 million electric motors and driven around 45 million screws since kicking off in 2013.
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On 8/19/2015 2:10 PM, Casper wrote:

Good news Affordable cordless tools. This seems to be a trend or at least they are becoming less expensive. Several weeks ago Festool dropped the price of their replacement Li-Ion 5amp 15v battery to less that 1/2 of what it had been. Actually inexpensive compared to most any other brand.
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On 8/19/2015 4:04 PM, Leon wrote:

I recently looked at the DeWalt tools and was unimpressed. They were NICAD units, and were not marked on the outside. HD was selling them for a premium price, made me think they were Lithium. Opened the box and they were Nicad.. disappointed.
Also recently watched a YouTube video by this guy AVE, he opens the tools and does reviews. Their 20v unit was only 18volt same as the Milwakee, same batteries. ... Just a marketting sham. The Dewalt Hammer drill did not hammer through rock in the test.
So Dewalt is on my Buyer Beware list. You don't always get what you pay for.
--
Jeff

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says...

WHICH DeWalt tools. All of the 18v tools run on your choice of NiCd or Lithium--you can also get NiMH rebuilt packs that the DeWalt charger will charge.
The 20v MAX tools are lithium-only.
And the 20v is not "a marketing sham", it uses a different pack from the 18v tools and the reason is that that way the battery manager can be in the tool and charger allowing for much less expensive lithium packs than for the 18v tools. Calling it "20v" just keeps it from being confused with the 18v.
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On 8/19/2015 5:13 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

They could have made it a bit less misleading by calling it 20L MAX. The "v" apparently does not represent actual voltage.
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Leon wrote:

Yes, I guess we'll have to start relying on specifications rather than meaningless labels..
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On 8/19/2015 6:13 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

Yes, but the box was not marked. You would think it would say Nicad or Lithium on the box. That it would not have to be opened. two guys at HD could not find a marking. So we opened it.
the 20V is the same as the Milwakee 18v 5 batteries. 8350 I think.See the video where he take it apart.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHCS7JXfuv0

--
Jeff

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says...

So sue them.
Why do you care so much?
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On 8/19/2015 4:46 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Well they are a little deceptive. Festool IIRC does the same thing. I noticed on the DeWalt site that the 20V would seem to indicate 20 volts. Oddly they don't say 20 volts. Their other tools do indicate voltage. So while a person would naturally assume that 20V means 20 volts, that apparently is not so.
Equally odd is that like voltage competitors may or may not last as long on a full charge doing the same thing as the others.
So when buying a cordless tool you can't really judge its power by it's assumed voltage. My "15" volt Festool runs circles around my "12" Makita impact and the impact would probably run circles around most any 20 volt driver drill.
I think the only thing that you can assume is that the larger the number, within a product line, the better it will perform within that product line. Not necessarily when compared to the competition with like assumed voltages.
Given that it appears most Li-Ion cells are 3.7 or 4.2 volts nether divides into 20 evenly. So they like Festool probably round the number. Keep in mind also that a normally functioning battery will indicate a higher voltage right after charging than it will a few minutes after use.
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wrote:

That's not unusual. It's a matter of where you measure the voltage on a battery. During charge, the voltage is a lot higher than a discharged battery. Since LiIon batteries have a terminal voltage somewhere in the 3.5V-4.2V range (depending on when you measure), it would be impossible to have both an 18V battery and a 20V battery. The same battery will be both, at different points in its charge cycle. I have Bosch batteries that are marked 10.8V and 12V. They're exactly the same batteries, for the same tools. The 10.8V batteries are the older batteries. I suspect that they were losing market share to the "more powerful" 12V tools, so the marketing department fixed the problem.

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While what you say about charging is true, there is a standard way to measure battery cells, and by that standard a LiIon cell is 1.2V. Any rating which is not a multiple of 1.2V is not measured by the standard (or is a flat out lie), and should be considered to be false advertising.
John
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On Thu, 20 Aug 2015 01:35:55 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

That's completely wrong. NiCd is "accepted" to be 1.2V, but NiCd has a very flat discharge curve. None of this is true with LiIon. LiIon will be somewhere between about 3.5V at discharge and 4.2V when charging (some charge to 4.1V). At a full charge, the terminal voltage will be about 4V. At "complete" discharge (it varies a little depending on how many cycles you want the battery to last, the terminal voltage is 3.5V-3.6V. There is also a little difference between LiIon varieties (LiIon vs. LiPo, for instance). An 18V or 20V battery will be five of these cells. 5 x 4V is 20V. 5 x 3.6V is 18V. Pick your poison. There is no 4.5 cell battery. An 18V LiIon battery is *exactly* the same as a 20V LiIon battery.
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On Wed, 19 Aug 2015 15:10:19 -0400

they should focus on quality control because no one focuses like we used to on where it is made
it is a good trend but i have one dewalt tool left i would say too little too late
their battery charging in their charger almost burned the house down another hour and it would have succeeded no longer have that drill
got a makita now and do not know or care where it was made it is a good drill
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This is really old news about the batteries. I don't remember the exculpat ory language on their boxes, but they make it plain that the tool could hit a 20V output occasionally.
I had a long talk with the rep that sold DeWalt for about 5 years when I ra n into him at HD, and he told me one of the reasons he left DeWalt/BD was t hat he was tired of being screamed at for phony advertising from not only t he people that bought the tools but the vendors as well. He also told me h ow many people tested the batteries and found that they operated with the s ame output as their 18V tools, just did it longer.
From 2011:
http://www.coptool.com/dewalt-20v-max-cordless-tools-the-new-way-to-say-18v /
http://www.finehomebuilding.com/item/17628/new-dewalt-cordless-in-a-world-o f-18v-tools-why-go-20v-max
http://goo.gl/xncWuc
I remember how pissed off my contractor buddies were because there were act ual 20 and 24 volt tools out there, not 18s masquerading as 20V. A great ma rketing coup for DeWalt as most people never read the packaging or did any research on the new DeWalt schemes, never looked at an article and never us ed the internet. Since they paid a premium for the tools and the new side by side battery configuration wasn't compatible with the rest of their 18V DeWalt tools, the took them back.
Although I think DW was banking on the "Tim Taylor effect" of more power is good (and it certainly has worked well for them!), they said we as consume rs were protected from our own weak minded confusion by their false labels. I was happy to see that they lied for my benefit as I thought they were be ing intentionally deceptive. I was pleased to hear that corporate America was looking out for me.
I feel that if they will lie about something that simple, they will lie abo ut other things. Unless I got a steal on a DeWalt tool, I wouldn't touch t hem. My personal experience with them many years ago was great, but has be en so/so over the past few years, so they aren't anything I look at for too l purchase/replacement.
I doubt that "American made" will mean much as far as quality goes as manuf acturing skills have left us long ago. The hope would be that the complica ted pieces and parts for the tools would be made somewhere else where they have the technology and quality control to make them and ship them here for use. Then maybe, maybe they could train people to screw the pieces togeth er.
Guess we'll see.
Robert
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On Wed, 19 Aug 2015 23:57:20 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

The US has the ability to make a quality tool, but between Marketing and Accounting, hitting a low price point with high volume is more important. There was a time that Black & Decker meant quality too, now they are cheapened for the mass market, not the skilled craftsman. DeWalt is just a half step above that in yellow.
I do have two DeWalt tools, a sander and miter saw. Both are serviceable for the price, but there are better out there.
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says...

Most of my deWalt tools have taken 15 years of beating. I do have some newer ones as I recently had a huge increase in disposable income and I'm looking to complete my 18v collection before they're discontinued.
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No wonder you are so defensive. And judging by what you display that you do with those tools it is no wonder that they have lasted 15 years. I have a 30 year old B&D belt sander, the belt that is on it is 25 years old.
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In article <1832125228461762060.310363lcb11211-

I thought I killfiled you.
<plonk you, all Leons, and the domain your rode in on>
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On 8/20/2015 4:43 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

Thought, there is only one way I get here.
ROTFLMAO
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On Thursday, August 20, 2015 at 5:01:51 AM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Well said. I remember going into the trades back in the early 70s, and it was a different world. There were NO foreign tools on the job. Porter Cab le was king, and they made a fine grade of professional tools. They had so me competition with the industrial line of Black and Decker (excellent tool s, available only through a professional jobber), Millers Falls, the top li ne of Skil, and from a small company that made drills and the original Sawz all, Milwaukee. They were the kings of the job site as they cost a lot, bu t they lasted for years on site, and were rebuildable. I still have my Mil waukee Hole Shooter purchased in '76, and although it has had many cords, a few sets of brushes and a trigger or two, it still works! My last Milwauk ee circular saw was rebuilt (bearings, brushes, triggers, cords) than I rem ember, and it finally had so many things wrong they couldn't get all the pa rts. My Porter Cable circular saw (346C) runs to this day. It is so old y ou have to load the grease cup every few days when you are using it.
These were fine tools, engineered for professionals that put them to work a ll day long. I didn't cry about spending money on them; I dutifully waited until I could afford them as I knew they were a good investment in a quali ty tool. My last American made tools to do that for me are my Bosch router , my Bosch circular saw, and my Sioux circular sander/polisher. All of tho se models are made somewhere else now, somewhere other than here.
So I know it can be done. ANYPLACE that can make a tool that will serve on the job for 30 years or more knows their stuff, and that used to be us. I just don't think there is that kind of desire for quality or the desire to make it by a manufacturer. "Good enough" is the manufacturing standard of the day, and I have adjusted my expectations accordingly.
I think it odd to see foreign names on the tools being touted so highly. T hinking back on the old tools when I was reading this thread, I remember ba ck in the early 70s there were NO foreign tools allowed. Period. If you h auled it out on site, you were warned to put it up or it got smashed. I li ve in "Military City USA" where we has at one time 8 military bases.
So there were no Japanese tools. There were no German tools. There were n o Italian tools. Thinking back, WWII was only about 25 - 27 years past us, and that wasn't far enough for the experienced hands on the job. Some of the guys I worked with weren't even 50, and they served in WWII, so they th ought it disrespectful and disloyal to support our old enemies in any way. The local unions banished all foreign made tools from the jobs, period, no exceptions. We used American only and were damn proud of it.

I like their 10" miter saw, and have a few other DeWalts and agree with you r statement. No bad, but I quit seeing too many DeWalt products on the job for a real simple reason: they don't last well for site use. Their drill s are still pretty good, and since they are now priced around the Ryobis, a re probably a pretty good deal, as they now have the same warranty as the R yobi products. I have never had a saw or drill from DeWalt last longer tha n 3 years, so I think their warranty reflects their product confidence. Ho pefully, they would last a homeowner longer than that since I probably use saws and drills in a week more than some do in a year.
Guess we will see what happens to the new made in America line. I have bud dies that will buy those tools simply because they have that sticker. When I had three DW recips saws in a row fail in one week, a drill last about 2 years (one year warranty at that time) and had to return other DW tools si mply due to poor quality of fit/finish/performance, that did it for me.
Robert
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