Dewalt 625 - Squealing Router

So, I am in the middle of raising about a dozen panels in my router table, and when I shut the puppy off and I get a squealing sound, really awful, out of the 625 and the shaft is hot and hard to turn. Never happened before. To make a long story short, I took apart the top and bottom and used some penetrating oil on the bushings where the shaft rides, and it seems ok now. Shaft moves fine, no apparent slop, so I finished up my panels. Later, I dug out the manual which says nothing about regular lubrication, I had assumed sealed bearings or whatever, frankly I never looked. Unit is 5 years old, moderate use, dedicated to router table. I have a dust collector line into the router table (Norm's design) which is always used, and I blow out the router with compressed air regularly during use.
Questions: Anyone else have this issue, and what did you do about it? Am I looking at some new parts here (as if it happened once it will likely recur)? Does anyone else have a oiling schedule they follow?
thx. Mutt
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I have a 15 year old Bosch that has been making that noise intermittently for the last 10 years. No problems, just the noise. I am thinking the brushes may be the noise maker if that is possible. The noise seems to happen just before the shaft stops rotating.
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The shaft being hot and hard to turn is a sure sign that the bearings are on their way out. They are sealed and maintenance free, the best action is to replace both. There are products some claim can penetrate the seals I haven't tried them, but I suspect they are more effective on bearings with dust shields as opposed to dust seals.
I would be a little wary about blowing out the router, the fan design provides positive pressure within the router mechanical body. Machine tool manuals advise against cleaning with compressed air because it can force contaminants into sliding surfaces. I normally clean with brush, vac and a rag.
Bernard R
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Hi Mutt,
As mentioned in a similar thread....regular use of a bearing lubricant as a preventative measure on at least the lower bearing near the collet is a great idea, prevents overheating & prolongs the life of both the bearings & the router as a whole, some routers have a removable cap giving access to the other bearing which is a great idea, check & relube that one if so equipped. If you hear a slight squeal only on start up or slowing down....lubricating is probably all that's required, but if it squeals during full load it is wise to replace it ASAP. A bearing meltdown can be dangerous when a router goes from about 23000 RPM or so to a blinding stop in a split second, also major damage can be caused to your router if a bearing overheats & melts into the housing causing the armature to be misaligned.....worse case scenario...I have even seen routers brought in that have had armatures hit the field & literally explode. If you rotate the shaft by hand & it feels even the least bit rough or there is a section of the rotation that meets great resistance go straight to bearing replacement. The biggest offender is routers with poor ventilation, upside down in router table left running between work pcs, some industrial production routers can handle that abuse but other than those when possible always shut the router off.
--
Jon Down
http://www.stores.ebay.com/jdpowertoolcanada
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I had the same problem with my DW621, making noise and hard to turn (not a squealing noise but more of a grating sound). When I let off on the switch it was as if there was a brake on the motor which stopped it almost immediatly. I suspected bearings but when I took it apart, I found that the fan had slipped on the shaft and was rubbing against the housing. The fan blades were worn where they were hitting. Looks like the cooling fan is just a friction fit on the shaft. I managed to move it a little on the shaft away from the housing and no more noise and easy to turn. So, might not be bearings at all. Bearings look sealed anyhow. If it happens again maybe I'll try some sort of spacer that will keep the fan from slipping.
Regards, Charlie in Kentucky
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Mutt) wrote in message

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Yes...that particular router seems to have that problem, we have had a few come in for service like that, the cheap fix is to push the fan as far away from where it is meant to seat apply a little good quality 5 minute epoxy where it is meant to press fit then push the fan back into place, by the time you have the rest of the router back together it is ready to use. DeWalt however will try to sell you a whole new armature fan & bearings.
--
Jon Down
http://www.stores.ebay.com/jdpowertoolcanada
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<snip>
Loctite shaft lock comes in different strengths and is ideal for solving this problem. Enco www.use-enco.com carries pretty much the whole range.
Bernard R
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Thanks everyone for the advice; gives me some things to check out.
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