desktop seam support question

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DJ Delorie wrote:

That's what I'm talking about--that's an applied moulding.
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dpb wrote: ...

..so continue it around the sides of the pedestals and you've got your support for the sides of the center section and a much nicer-looking end panel on the end panel.
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How about some angle iron, maybe 3/4" in size? It could start a few inches back so it's not noticeable.
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DJ Delorie wrote:

Probably too low tech for you but I'd just add a board under the side modules that extends, say, 3/4" past the top. The corner module would then sit on those and be held to the side modules with the draw bolts (which might need a smidge of up<>down wobble). Alternatively, a couple of threaded inserts along the underside of each side of the center module, bolts through the added boards into them; taper the center module edges slightly downward for easy bolt insertion and a "just grew there" look when snugged up.
That would add a new problem in as much as ends of the boards would be visible. Two solutions...
1. Make them maybe only 2/3 - 3/4 as long as the side modules are wide. Not totally invisible but unless someone is crawling around on the floor they wouldn't be seen.
2. Put a keyboard tray or drawer under the center module. This would get my vote.
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dadiOH
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Hey DJ.. To me the most important consideration is expansion and contraction of that hardwood top. The center section will expand and contract across the grain towards the chair and as it does so the mitered joints between the top sections will expand and contract a bit also... much like any other mitered joint if it is not securely connected to the adjoining part in some manner. If you simple use a lap joint and do not fasten the pieces together, I'm pretty sure the seam will open with change in humidity and season. To me, it seems necessary to securely connect the top pieces together so this won't happen. Draw bolts with biscuits for alignment as you suggested sounds to me like a very good way to accomplish that. Basically you then have one tabletop and not three pieces. Since its solid wood you can't just screw base cabinets to the top and not allow it to expand and contract naturally or you risk the stress causing the top to crack. So you need to build a framework, like a web frame, into the top of the cabinets, and possibly but not necessarily, between the cabinets, that will support the top and allow you to connect the two in a way that won't prevent the top from expansion and contraction. There's a variety of ways to fasten the top... wooden buttons, metal fasteners, so on. The top basically floats on the cabinets. I think if you keep these considerations in mind you can figure this out for yourself..

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