Designing

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Will it float if it is balloon shaped?
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On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 12:47:33 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

Depends. (sorry, not talking about your undies.) Lead balloons don't float, most others do.
-- The United States of America is the greatest, the noblest and, in its original founding principles, the only moral country in the history of the world. -- Ayn Rand
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wrote:

Axchewishly..... lead balloons DO float. Mythbusters made a lead balloon which floated just fine.
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Robatoy wrote:

This thread has covered a lot of ground in half a day... lol
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On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 14:50:03 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

Let's put it this way: 99.99999% of lead balloons don't float, even if filled with helium, hydrogen, or floatium.
I'm guessing that the one on Mythbusters was filled with Sedona, oops, Sarnia Banana Gas. I understand that it's quite like floatium. Lifty, man.
-- The United States of America is the greatest, the noblest and, in its original founding principles, the only moral country in the history of the world. -- Ayn Rand
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you should see the hilarious epiode ...
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Han
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Those guys are having way too much fun. Talk about a dream job.....
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Bang!
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Han
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I don't know how to use Shetch-Up or any other similar program. I get many ideas, for projects, from every/any-where and I sometimes create my own modifications, when/where needed, as I suppose most hobbists do.
I have become proficient enough that I can often start basic construction (rough cutting, rough measures, ie., educated guesses) with many construction aspects, but when it comes to details for things like jointery fit dimensions, boards lengths, panel dimensions, I'll go to the planning table and draw out the exact measures and coordinate the correct cuts & assembly details. It is often at these times - detailed measurement figures, drawing/planning schematics, fitting via measures - that I may discover a previous measure/figure/ fit will need to be tweaked. If this detailed phase of the project was not fun, also, I would likely skimp on the exactness of the measures, figures, fits, etc., and my pleasure with getting a project finished, properly, would fall short. If I don't build it correctly, and enjoy what I'm doing, then the whole process would simply be a chore or task to be done. My hobby projects are not chores to be done!
*Repairing a tool is sometimes a chore, but at the same time, rewarding, because I know the end result will allow me to get back to doing the pleasureable work, using that tool. I like fixing (maintenance) a tool successfully, too, and sharpening a tool perfectly, etc. It's nice to have a good reliable (old friend) tool working well for me. Somehow (?), I enjoy the "company" of many of my tools and my shop. They are like old friends. They are not job- sites. Some old hand-me-down tools, somehow, I sense, come with the friendship of the previous owners, too.... and that's a comforting thought, too. (LOL, I think I'm getting into a foggy (Tao) realm, here, (like Grasshopper in Kung Fu, was it?), becoming one with the tool.)
There have been times when I build something, not that I need it for a function in my home or elsewhere, but I build it because I think I can. This initial thinking is part of the planning stage, I suppose. Later, I either find a personal use for it or give it away.
I know how to make many particular joints. I know how to make moldings/ profiles, I know how to make many of these kinds of specific "designs" or parts. The detailed planning for coordinating and assembling all of these parts is what I spend lots of out-of-shop time doing.... making sure all the measures/figures/dimensions/fits allow for the working/coordinating/assembling of everything properly.
It is rewarding to accomplish the building of a nice piece (excellent outcome). However, there has been times when I, personally, have been more gratified for having solved/created a particular design aspect/issue, within the piece (because of the detailed out-of-shop planning/measuring/figuring), than the satisfaction I've had with the whole of the finished piece. Somehow, I think, I have more gratification for solving/creating a detail, than if I were to rely on a computer program to solve/create it for me. .... Does that make sense? Not sure my meaning is clear, here. Maybe if I used (learned to use) Sketch-Up or something, I would appreciate what it has to offer, just like any other good reliable tool.
I think I got off on a few tangents, here. It's cold outside and I'm stuck indoors.... a scenario for ramblings on, that way. Sonny
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Designing is part of the fun but as for drawing the plan out, it depends. If it's another table, nightstand, etc that I've already done several of then I already have the design/plan in my head and just need to vary the dimensions. Simple things like shop jigs I design in my head as I go. First time projects or those having exact dimensions usually get designed on paper or sketchup. Anything with expensive wood *always* gets complete design plans first and sometimes even a cheap wood prototype. I have been known to make an error or two on paper and even in sketchup. Art
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Depends on the project. On the wagon I built a while back I drew the wheels up in 3D with all dimensions, the body in 2D, and the rest kind of winged. On the other hand, the sandalwood box in the medicine cabinet that contains my comb, straight razor, and some other oddments when not in use I just started cutting.
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On 1/11/2011 10:31 AM, Bill wrote:

Old coonass proverb: A job begun without a plan gets no better.
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Last update: 4/15/2010
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Depends on the project. Larger projects such as a new cabinet or similar work usually gets pretty well planned before I start. I am an old board draftsman and I normally do a "layout" drawing before I start. As a draftsman, "layout" was not a finished, pretty drawing; rather a fit and function layout with rough dimensions. This layout usually defines about 50-75% or the end product, the rest might be worked out during fabrication and assembly. For most jobs, I do the layout on a 2' square piece of poster board and use my trusty drafting table with a parallel bar. Shop sketches, using the layout as baseline, are done using quad pad on a clipboard that hangs near my bench.,
For the record, I am CAD trained but the training goes way back (1980's early 90's), After that I had the misfortune :^} of getting into management and never used CAD much. I have fiddled with PC-based CAD and used the architectural program PUNCH to conceptually lay out our new house. I have looked at Sketchup and others but frankly, I would rather lay it out by hand and work in the shop than learn design software. Maybe someday.
RonB
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"RonB" wrote:
Depends on the project. Larger projects such as a new cabinet or similar work usually gets pretty well planned before I start. I am an old board draftsman and I normally do a "layout" drawing before I start. As a draftsman, "layout" was not a finished, pretty drawing; rather a fit and function layout with rough dimensions. This layout usually defines about 50-75% or the end product, the rest might be worked out during fabrication and assembly. For most jobs, I do the layout on a 2' square piece of poster board and use my trusty drafting table with a parallel bar. Shop sketches, using the layout as baseline, are done using quad pad on a clipboard that hangs near my bench.,
For the record, I am CAD trained but the training goes way back (1980's early 90's), After that I had the misfortune :^} of getting into management and never used CAD much. I have fiddled with PC-based CAD and used the architectural program PUNCH to conceptually lay out our new house. I have looked at Sketchup and others but frankly, I would rather lay it out by hand and work in the shop than learn design software. Maybe someday. ---------------------------------- Great minds run in the same gutter.
Put myself thru school slinging lead on a drafting table starting when I was 18..
After graduation from college, it was free hand sketches for the drafting department to convert into finished drawings.
As a salesman, it was cocktail napkin engineering time.
Lost track of how many jobs were entered with a pile of napkins documenting the job, especially control diagrams for process automation, electrical power distribution systems and industrial lighting layouts.
If I were 20 and starting again, I'd be gung ho over some puter design program; however, at this point in my life, the spirit doesn't move me to learn new puter programs.
Built a 55 ft, double head sail ketch with nothing but sketches done with a couple of triangles and pads of 8x8 graph paper.
Not for everybody, but works for me.
Lew
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Spend most time designing, process of coming up with as many answers as possible, then reducing to the best, simplest of the crop. The axiom "less is more" proves itself every time. Ideas come from anywhere. I carry a sketchbook (pencil and point perspective work better than CAD software, and I have years' experience with ACAD) and fill between 2 and 6 pages pretty much every day, makes better use of doctor's office waiting room time than reading the latest copy of People. Evening is the most fertile time for really good ideas. Usually fill a page or two before going to sleep.
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