Design for my garage shop

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If they're in different locations I believe you're required to have a local disconnect. This can easily be accomplished by inserting a breaker, rated for the wire between the sub and main panels, into the panel and feeding it "backwards" (the electrons don't know the difference). This breaker should be marked clearly as the disconnect.

Yup.
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Too much in your message(s) to really make meaningful/rational comments.
So please get some more learning.
Also be aware that the RV power you mention is probably 30 or 50 amp power. Sure it is 240 volt? And too small for the shop enviorment you mention.
Where and how 240 volts is sourced to the consumer, has been mentioned here, but the details that transform the high voltage on the power pole or in the power vault that is near you property line is more complex than what has been mentioned here.
If you add a power (sub)panel that is sourced from your service panel remember that are limitations in the code. The neutral and the ground need to be separate and not connected circuits.
Bob AZ
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I'm sorry MS-Outlook6 does such a poor job of formatting my reply. I typed after the dashes.
Too much in your message(s) to really make meaningful/rational comments.
So please get some more learning.
Also be aware that the RV power you mention is probably 30 or 50 amp power. Sure it is 240 volt? And too small for the shop enviorment you mention.
------------- I just went and looked at it with a flashlight--125v, 30-Amps, "for Travel-trailer use only". The plug shape made me think it was 220... Maybe the line would be suitable for a dedicated DC. I need to learn more about that outlet.
Where and how 240 volts is sourced to the consumer, has been mentioned here, but the details that transform the high voltage on the power pole or in the power vault that is near you property line is more complex than what has been mentioned here.
--
Yes, I know little more than that I have a 3 year old (due to hail damage)
200 amp service
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...

But those details are of absolutely no concern for the subject. The level of detail that explains what he has at his panel is more than adequate for now...
--
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It isn't. A 120V line is half of a 240V line. ;-)

If there are four wires here, you can simply put a subpanel in its place and wire 120 or 240 circuits out of it. You will be limited to the current supported by the wire size.

If it's there, leave it. Does it get wet?

Fluorescent?
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It's just 6" off of the ground. It doesn't get wet.

Yes, What a strangely spelled word (I checked)!
--Bill
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That is pretty low, but I wouldn't mess with it unless you have to move/rewire it for some other reason.

:-)
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1. Never enough outlets.
a) Try running 12/3 or to all you outlets, isolating the top from the bottom and adding a switch to the bottom outlets if not to top and bottom. This will allow you to leave those wall transformers plugged in 24/7, but turn off power to them when you leave the shop.
b) Duplex outlets in the ceiling can serve ideally for the four foot fluorescent "shop lamps" sold at Lowes, HD, etc for about $9. And you can do the switched approach on these as well in case you have a need for a DROP CORD approach to a tool - assuming your shop would not be usable with the lights off e.g. nto enough window area to let in sufficient daylight for working.
2. The wall on the house side might prove a treasure trove of points to secure power, telephone line, cable TV, water, sewer access. Is the floor of the shop even with that of the house/kitchen? Hey, how about a shop sink/eyewash station replete with drain?
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Thanks Hoosierpopi!
Hoosierpopi wrote:

For extra measure of safety?

Yes, I like this idea. Switches here make good sense. I'd use more overhead-lights except that electric garage door opens right to the ceiling and the pull-down "stairway to the attic" blocks another good location for a light fixture.

You are right. It's a shame not to have (more than 1) outlet on that wall. The opposing wall I can tear down, and no one will care. The kitchen wall is sure to be full of insulation--and if it's insulated like the attic, it will be "full of fluff/lint" that looks like it came out of a vacuum cleaner. What do you think of the idea of cutting a 8" opening most of the length of the wallboard to install several electric boxes, and then replacing it?
I'd like to add outlets outside the garage too... As long as I'm making a mess, I may as well make it a big one! ; )
Thanks, Bill
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I copied & pasted below from: http://www.handymanclub.com/Projects/Project.aspx?id 483 (We've given The HandyMan Club a bad rap here--but they had a decent article).
I quote: "When determining where to install a subpanel, be sure to follow the National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements. In front of the subpanel, youll need free working space thats 36 in. deep and at least as wide as the subpanel (or 30 in. wide whichever is greater). The space above the panel must be completely open to the structural ceiling (no shelving, etc.), and the space below must be open to the floor (no lawnmowers, trash cans, workbenches, etc.)."
Am I to understand from this that if a subpanel is mounted flush on a wall, that nothing is to be place in FRONT of it (ever)? It comes down to where it is written: "the space below must be open to the floor"---does that refer to the space directly below the subpanel or include the 36" in front of it mentioned earlier. Otherwise, I'd have what--a fire violation?
This may conflict with one of our "valuable space axioms" that Roy, IIRC, mentioned before.
Just Curious, Bill
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On 3/17/2010 1:20 AM, Bill wrote:

It's a 10-4 that you would have an "electrical code violation",
That said, when the inspector leaves most home owners go ahead and make a clothes closet out of that "machine room" .... if you now what I mean. :)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
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