Design for my garage shop

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At my site linked to below is a almost-to-scale model (pdf and SketchUp) of the 20' by 20' garage shop I am trying to assemble, as viewed from the omitted garage door.
Ignore the water purification system in the corner ; ) The workbench design and tools are mostly accurate only to size. The BS has a mobile base (not shown), the TS will get one too.
Besides for the 240V outlet on the one wall, there is 120V outlet on each wall (I think I should check and see whether they are wired on one circuit).
Please let me know if you can think of any suggestions or "rules" I'm breaking. This is my first draft . I really wanted to check and see how the 7' workbench will fit!
http://web.newsguy.com/MySite /
Bill
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Bill wrote:

You need more outlets. The more the better but at least 3 per wall IMO - I hate cords strung everywhere. At least two circuits, more better.
The TS in the center is good but you need power for it. As I said, I hate cords strung everywhere so the outlet for my TS is in the ceiling. There are both 240v and 120v. Yes, a cord hangs down but at least it isn't always getting stepped on.
Be sure you have at least eight feet in front of and behind the TS.
You'll undoubtedly be adding bench top tools which implies more benches. When I build same I incorporate electrical outlets into them so that other tools or adjacent benches will have conveniently placed outlets.
You need an area to store stuff...sheet goods, lumber, work in progress, etc.
--

dadiOH
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On 2/7/2010 5:00 AM, Bill wrote:

If I were to make a suggestions to your shop layout it would be the addition of a workbench that can be rolled around the shop. When you are working on the table saw you can roll the workbench up to the table saw to a comfortable point where you can pick up, saw, put down. When you are working on the drill press the bench rolls you can stage the pieces to be drilled and have a place to put the items after drilling. If you plan it correctly the rolling workbench can become an out feed for the table saw when you are ripping long pieces of wood or plywood. It eliminates a lot of unnecessary movement of parts around the shop.
I have one and am considering adding a second so I can adjust the rolling benches to create instant work stations for which ever tools I am using.
I have all of my tools on wheels since my work shop is shared with my cars, the rolling benches and tools can be moved to the side so the cars can be put into the garage.
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My suggestions:
1. You'll need substantial wall space for shelves and cabinets to store power hand tools, fasteners, finishes, hand tools, blades and bits, and , of course, the Rigid Tool catalog with the girls in bikinis. Some of this can go under the bench or other power tools, but plan for it now.
2. You'll need an outfeed table for the TS; plan it now. It could be a mobil bench with storage.
3. Wood and sheet goods storage.
4. I much prefer having my bench away from the wall so I can work from all sides.
5. Compressor.
I have a small shop (half of a two car garage, ~ 10' X 19'). The number one drawback is: storage. I'm constantly having to move tools and stuff from the bench to the saw back to the bench, &tc. I think planning for storage is more important than tool layout, at least at first.
-Zz
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More outlets. Lots more. My 3 car garage started with bare walls, one lightbulb and three outlets. Two were in the ceiling to plug in garage door openers. I now have one (42" above floor) every 4 feet spread over 4 circuits. Some of the duplexes have been upgraded to quads so I can leave things plugged in near the benches. I have only 1 220 outlet, but started to install 2 more, when SWMBO and I decided we would move in the next year. Upgrading the wiring was a no brainer. My son is in a rental house, and he has added one circuit with 6 outlets plus a 220 (all surface mount) to the garage there. Took less than a day.
Lots of lights, including local lighting. Your probably need 4-6 sets of fluorescent over head, plus spot lighting. I buy those adjustable lights with a clamp on plastic base at the thrift store for $1. Throw away the base, and make one out of wood by drilling a 1/2 inch hole in a 2x6x18 scrap. That's heavy enough to act as a base and move anywhere. I also drill holes in convenient wood structures for permanent positions for the lamps. I have 4 of these in the shop. Get some of the HF magnetic base lights when they go on sale for $5. Helluva deal, and work just as well as the $15-20 ones in the other catalogs.
Put in some overhead cabinets for storage. Install a window behind the workbench. Insulate the garage door. Put the trash can outside and use a 5 gallon plastic bucket inside. Floor space is precious. Put every large tool on wheels. Replace the base of every tool that just stands on legs with some sort of roll around cabinet. All a base does is hold the tool up in the air. A cabinet does that plus doubles as storage. Hang shit on the outside of the roll around bases. You need all the storage you can get. Get a lathe and put it on wheels. Build a lathe tool box on the base. Take a picture of the clean floor. This is the last time you will see it, especially if you get a lathe.
Build a chimney cupboard/tower to hold small tools like a grinder, bench top sander, etc that can be screwed to a plywood base and mounted in your workbench vise when needed. Floor space is precious. A couple years ago I broke down and bought the Sears 80th anniversary ball bearing tool cabinet while it was very seriously on sale (close out). I'm amazed at how much crap I can stick in it for storage. I still have to use auxiliary drawers to hold hand planes and scrapers and other goodies, but one of those rolling toolboxes is not a bad idea. You need more storage than you think.
I'd love to have a utility sink and commode (or even a urinal) in my shop. Maybe the next one. I live just outside Houston. I put AC in the shop several years ago and think it was one of the smartest things I ever did. My tools don't rust any more, and I can work in comfort when it is 100F and 100% humidity. In winter I just use a couple space heaters. It's not enough to really warm the place, but gets it into the 50's.
Don't let the kids or SWMBO use any part of the garashop for storage. They know that floor space is precious, and will become squatters if allowed. You're the Captain. The Shop is your Ship. Be prepared to repel boarders.
Regards, Roy

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On 2/7/2010 11:29 AM, Roy wrote:
<snipped tons of great advice>

This is absolutely one of the handiest damn things you can have in your shop, and I don't think it occurs to most people during the planning phase. It's one of the first things I installed when I set up shop in our new house a few years ago.
--
See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
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"Steve Turner" wrote:

------------------------------------ Right next to it are the GO-GO hand cleaner and paper towel dispensers along with the 30 gallon garbage can.
Lew
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Put "everythigng" on mobile bases. On mobile bases you can move any thing any where and nothing is at a disadvantaged because it is not stationary.
My shop has 2 large tool chests, water heater, DP, 22/44 drum sander, DC, Router table, 15" planer, mobile trash bag cart, washer & dryer, upright freezer, 4 drawer file safe, lathe, work bench, a mobile base home for a Spindle sander, 12" disk sander, mortiser, BS, 50" capacity cabinet saw, lathe, scrap and clamp bin, 25 gal compressor, wall cabinets,
and
my wife's car.
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Bill, you've sure gotten some good advice from the others, and I don't disagree with anything posted so far. Consider placing the DC and an air compressor OUTSIDE the garage in a lean-to, giving you more floor space. 120v plugs should be at least every 3' on the three sides of the garage. Consider running a 240v on a 20' or so cord from the ceiling over the TS. Build an outfeed table on rollers and incorporate storage in it. Consider installing one wall with both base and overhead cabinets for storage and a long work surface. Personally, I'd put the TS and outfeed both on rollers and make the center of the shop a BIG workbench with storage underneath as well. You also can't have enough good lighting in a shop- go with multiple 4' flourescents, rather than long 8' ones to cut down on shadows.
Pressure wash, acid wash and then epoxy coat the floor. Yes, it'll be slick, but it'll also make cleaning easier. Consider a floor pickup for the DC, where you can sweep or blow chips into it.
Consider putting in a mud sink. They're handier than you might think in a shop if you can afford the space and have a drain handy. How about an overhead rack, above the opened garage door, to store wood and "stuff?"
--
Nonny

ELOQUIDIOT (n) A highly educated, sophisticated,
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Nonny wrote:

Yes, I received great advise!!! I took 3 pages of notes as I read --thank you folks for taking the time to share your knowledge and experience!!!
I did not draw-in the window on the back door, but I really do think it would be nice if there were a window 5 feet over on the back wall! I even asked my wife about it 2 weeks ago, "Hon, how much work do you think it would be to knock out a hole for a window in the brick wall in the garage?". : ) ___________ Roy wrote: Don't let the kids or SWMBO use any part of the garashop for storage. They know that floor space is precious, and will become squatters if allowed. You're the Captain. The Shop is your Ship. Be prepared to repel boarders. ____________
Yes, I laughed reading this. I don't know how many times in the 8 months of our occupancy that I have had to explain to my wife that the garage is Not for cars! She points up and down the street pointing out that "everyone else" on the street is keeping their cars in the garage. I have to counter--well, if everyone else jumped off a cliff, would you jump off too? ; ) The guy who moved in accross the street two weeks after we did cut out half of a workbench so his wife could park there (OHH, the sacrilege!!!).
As we moved in 8 months ago, there is still the property of some "squatters" piled up (not shown in my diagrams : )). Aye, matey, I'll see to it that it is thrown overboard!
There actually currently are about 8 unsightly, grungy, dirty 1970's kitchen cabinets up on back wall (previous owner was a welder, and had boat and RV (so it is flux, soot, transmission fluid, etc.). I wish to remove and rebuild, but I am pacing myself.
First major hands-on project will be prepping and epoxying the floor. Come on spring!--and "Go Colts!!!".
Thanks, Bill
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Without even studying yours... here's my ideas.. and those I "wish I had done"
-- put the dust/chip producers together on a simple central 1.5hp collector with 6" s&d pipe -- refitted the TS, jointer, and BS with 6" dc ports. Another "branch" of the line could accomodate miter station / planer / other. I grouped them all close together and in aligment so as to simplify the dust pipe plumbing. -- outlets along the wall at about 4-foot high (already there -- had to cut out one single gang box and make it a double (4 outlets) -- would have liked to have them about every 4' apart -- dedicated 220 outlet for DC -- 3 220 outlets on same circuilt for TS, Jointer, and TBD -- dedicated outlets circuit -- dedicated lights circuit -- outlets in ceiling to which I just plug standard 4' shop lights -- works very well -- just drive a screw threw the fixture into a ceiling 2x -- hate the cord web on my ceiling from the previous solution -- should have added 2 more outlets and planned this out better -- situated the TS near the garage door -- when cutting 4' material, no problems; when cutting >4' just open the garage door (also this fits into the DC design well) -- overhead cabinets along 1 wall - attached to wall with french cleats -- 3 cabinets -- open legged workbench under those cabinets -- plan was to put rolling drawer carts under the open bench -- might scrap that idea and just build-out the drawer cabinets, sit on leveled base, and put workbench atop -- priming all the walls, then painting (do this BEFORE you add a bunch of stuff!!!!!!!) -- planning 16' of shelving along 1 wall (ww stuff but also other shop items -- oil, battery charger, etc. -- thinking about a low-cost way to cover-up that shelving. thinking maybe a clear shower curtain -- see-through, but blocks-out dust build- up -- sheet goods on roller cart plan-in-the-works
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*snip*

*snip*
My garshop has moisture issues (especially when it's rained recently) and the TS is positioned under the opening garage door. Sometimes the moving door drips quite a bit of water on the saw top... not a good thing.
My plans call for moving it back soon, but I'm busy working on other projects at the moment. (The ice rink has frozen, I've got about a month of skating left. Gotta get it in now!)
Puckdropper
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Put your DC in the corner, it has to be connected via plumbing anyway. Your drill press being there limits the places you could possibly drill holes. Figure on around 3' clearance on both sides for the drill press. That'll allow you to handle holes on a 6' board.
More outlets is a must. If you do that, make sure the base is no lower than 48" for sheet good storage. (I'm running most my shop tools off a single extension cord that's plugged in to the tool I need at the moment. It works, but more outlets would be nice.)
You may also want to build your bench to the same height as the table saw, so it can be used as an infeed or outfeed table should a project require it.
Puckdropper
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I like to store everything against the wall on wheels. I work in the center or outside. So I like power by the door and hanging from the ceiling. Outlets on the wall are a waste for me. I store everything against the walls. I usually plug in an extension cord and work off that. If the weather permits I prefer to roll my tools outside to work letting the dust blow away in the wind. Air compressors are loud. Much prefer to put them in a small building next to the shop. I like to store stuff in plastic bins. When I go on location I just grab the bins that I need. I make rolling cabinets with shelfs to hold the bins. I make their heights to match my saw. I combine them to make work tables as needed. A tall ceiling is wonderfull.
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As others have pointed out, lots of outlets (every 3-4 feet and along the ceiling). Wire them as split duplexes, and a separate circuit for adjacent outlets.
Lots of light. No, even more. and on separate circuits so if one blows you can still see the spinning blade.
Instead of rolling stands, consider a hover pad (http://www.general.ca / pg_index/hoverpade.html).
Like Charlie Self said, cars belong outside, that's why they're painted so well.
Luigi
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Bill
More electric outlets. I built my shop abut 6 years ago and just used the last 220 outlet. I have 6 each. And 10 110v duplex receptacles. 6 to go and I will be out.
My Circuit Breaker panel, 60 amp fed from the service panel. 12 slots. Actually a 125 amp panel. Homeline Square D. Home Depot. I also have ceiling outlets for the bench in the middle of my shop. And outdoor outlets. I actually have a spare circuit from the service panel so I can shutoff the main shop power and still have some light for repairs and upgrades. Also an emergency light that comes on if I do trip the main shop subpanel circuit breaker.
Are you providing for cable, TV, phone, internet and fibre optic?
Be sure and run the conduit and floor boxes for the table saw in the middle of the floor. Wire in whatever one you need.
And last but most important a cooler for beer. Or a fridge for any possible shutouts in the event you have to repel domestic invaders?
Bob AZ
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"Bob AZ" wrote: More electric outlets. I built my shop abut 6 years ago and just used the last 220 outlet. I have 6 each. And 10 110v duplex receptacles. 6 to go and I will be out.
Everyone seems to agree I have insufficient electrical outlets and lighting (I currently have 3 florescent lamps with two 4' bulbs each and I know it's not enough).
My electrical box, which has 80 Amp service, has several unused places for circuit breakers. It feeds the wires straight up into the attic and they go every which way from there. I suppose that i could add a new line to the box and feed in down behind a wall to a new box. I suppose I'd have to tear up the drywall to get 3 services on a wall on one line. Is the electrical part of this something I can safely try myself if I "read up" on it (maybe get it inspected if I had any doubts afterward)? Having the lights and tools on separate circuits makes great deal of sense to me!
Bill
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Adding my comments to all the others.
I would definitely have some movable light, in addition to the regular lighting. You will always need a little more light for a project here and ther. Expcially for finishing work. I pick up the old spring arm lamps at garage sales for a buck or two. Then then put them in holes I have drilled around the shop. I also have some clamp type lights as well. I can put enough light on any area in the shop to cause blindness. (just kidding) The extra light has made some jobs possible and other jobs easier.
Another big convenience factor for me is to have outlets real close to the bench. I have installed them under the bench. I have installed them on the wall just above the benchtop if against the wall. And I have installed outlet strips onto the bench itself. This allows you to use power tools without the extension cords. Remember, extension cords can be a safety hazard. Trip over enough of them and you could get hurt. Besides, if you leave a bunch of extension cord on the ground long enough, they breed and multiply. And you will never get your shop back! (It's true, I have seen it happen) :-)
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Cable guys came out here a few years ago to fix a service problem, and while they were here I got them to run cable out to the garage. TV is too distracting when working with power tools that can seriously eat you if you have a lapse. However, I like using hand tools, and have no qualms about using them when the idiot box is on.
My wireless system peters out by the time it gets to the garage. Maybe the new N standard will be better when my current router dies, but I don't need a computer out in the shop.

The shop fridge is stocked with the necessary libations to end a good day. I often break out the beer to wash down the beef jerky stashed away out there in case I'm placed under siege. I declare being under siege a lot on Saturdays during football (rugby with safety equipment, Jeff) season.
Roy
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Roy wrote:

Or you could use a Pringles Can Antenna on it (google that).

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