Delta TS350 10" Table Saw with 1 HP Motor


After reading some reviews, I think this saw best fits my budget and immediate needs (since I am a newbie, its hard to identify what my current needs exactly are). While I personally don't know the difference between a good saw and a bad saw, I assuming that this a fairly decent saw by reading the reviews.
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Is there a better saw out there that I am missing in this price range? ($300-$400)
For example, this saw seems to have a lot features and is $70 cheaper. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberF813
Any advice/comments are appreciated.
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For the price, that looks like a good saw. However, I would suggest nothing smaller than a 1.5 hp, especially if you are going to work with hardwoods. Wait awhile if needed and save up a few more dollars. Another alternative would be to get a bandsaw, depending on what kind of woodworking you want to do: furniture - bandsaw, remodeling - tablesaw.
HTH
Locutus wrote:

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Thanks for the advice, a few people have suggested a bandsaw, my primary goal is furniture building (beds, tables, chests). Due to my limited experience, I guess I am having trouble understanding how a bandsaw can be used for this. The last time I used a bandsaw was in highshool woodshop, and we primarily used it as a large glorified scroll saw... The table on most of the bandsaws I see seems to small to be able to rip anything larger than a few inches wide?
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There several things a TS can do that a BS can't (i.e. dados, ripping plywood, smoother cuts with a good blade, etc.). But there are a lot of things a BS can do also beyond scrollsawing, including dovetails, tenons, resawing, and most rip cuts. Blades are much cheaper, and it's much safer with no risk of kickback since the blade is moving down and not towards you. Wide rips like plywood can be done with a handheld circular saw. I'd do some reading about bandsaws - you can get what I would consider a fairly good one for $300-400. Not trying to talk you out of the TS - just consider your options, what kinds of tools you'd probably keep indefinitely, and what kinds you'd want to be replacing in a few years. If you decide you still want a TS (or a BS), I'd look at Grizzly - they have 1.5HP TS models starting at $495 + shipping. Good luck, Andy
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Great... guess now I have to get both!! :)
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If you really want to get confused about the best choice, do a google Groups search on "Bandsaw vs Tablesaw"
(slight evil chuckle here)
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Locutus wrote:

These guys are bastards like that... my bandsaw will likely not cost ~$500, but ~$900 because of them.
er
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Just another thing to throw out here in case you're not confused enough... If you need something for right now while you're saving up a little more for a good-quality table saw, you might consider a little bandsaw. Woodcraft has a 10" Rikon for $150, and Craftsman has one that looks almost identical (except Craftsman is a bad word around here, and I've not had very good luck with their customer service). My 10" bandsaw is definitely not a heavy-duty tool made to last a lifetime, but it has served me fairly well, including ripping a 2"x8"x8' white oak board into slats for my mission bed project. Definitely not as cool or powerful or durable or smooth-cutting as a good tablesaw, but you might consider doing a project or 2 on something like this, save up some money, and then get your really nice cabinet saw assuming you're still addicted to woodworking at that point. Some here would definitely consider a $150 bandsaw a waste of money or a "disposable" tool, but some here would also consider a $300 TS a waste of money. Of course, no matter what tools you have, you can just plan your projects around what you have, and add a major tool or so for each project... (That's worked pretty well for me so far!) Alternatively, you can also make both cross- and rip-cuts quite accurately with a handheld circular saw, various jigs, and some patience - search the archives here for more on that. Sorry if that just made you more confused or overwhelmed - just have fun woodworking, Andy
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Andy wrote:

[snipple]
Nope, I bought one of those down the street for $10. I don't like it. It's fine for roughing out small projects, but not accurate, and with a narrow blade it has very little accuracy.
er
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BTW, I do a lot of "remodeling"... I have never really needed a table saw.
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I have the TS300, (stamped steel wings). As a newbe, it has served me well. A bit weak on power. Went together well. No problems yet. Been two years now, and one complete kitchen later, gonna upgrade to Griz 444Z soon.
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I say go for it. Your price point is, by definition, puts you in compromise territory. That saw is a bit lower end than I would prefer, but it is an excellent value. Will spending a few more $$$ get you a better saw? Sure, but only incrementally so.
As a newbie, it's more important to get in the game and make some dust, rather than to obsess about getting the perfect saw (which you are not going to find at that price point, without blowing the next decade of weekends traveling to estate sales).
As for the bandsaw rhetoric, don't worry about that. That TS will carry you a long way before you *need* a bandsaw.
Do it; make dust; be happy.
Cheers,
Steve
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Hi there,
Just wanted to point out that the saw you've got listed there is the top of the Delta "Shopmaster" line- as rather faithful Delta customer, I'd like to share my experience with that... All of my starter tools for my home shop were the less expensive shopmaster ones, and they're really not anywhere near the same league as the "Industrial" line- as a result, I'm currently in the process of replacing all of those first tools I selected with higher grade machines. The old ones are still operable, but the handles (in particular) have a tendancy to break and they are generally underpowered and do not accept standard accessories. For example, I have the TS that is step down from the TS300 (the TS220) and while it has been a trooper for me, it is what it is- after a couple of years, the trunnions are getting really stiff, the height adjustment handle is stripping out, and it's just far too light to do long rips safely without bolting it directly to the floor. The table is a non-standard size, so fence upgrades are out of the question, as are replacement miter gauges. The arbor is too short to accept a dado stack- something I knew when I bought it and thought it didn't matter, but I've since changed my tune. (I've got the local tool shop holding my new 36-680 for me, and I pick it up on Weds.)
I don't mean to just shoot it down on you- the TS350 looks like a fine piece of equipment if you're not sure if you're in this hobby for the long haul, and it will certainly work for you for a few years until you want to upgrade. But my suggestion, if you can come up with a couple hundred extra bucks (and I know that's usually easier said than done) is to take a look at the 36-6XX line (I like the 36-680 or better- then you get the cast iron wings) Right now, the local tool place has got it on sale for $499 here, and Delta has a mail-in offer for a free sawblade with it (they claim it's a $60 value, but that's usually overinflated a little) Amazon lists it for a bit more than that, but truth be told, Amazon is not the place to buy Delta- they generally do not have the best price on the stuff. If you go to Delta's site, they have a retailer lookup that will let you know who sells it in you area.
Here's the breakdown on the 36-6xx series- For a couple hundred extra dollars you get:
1. A 1.5hp motor that can be wired for 110 or 220v. 2. A standard table size that can accept any accessory Delta offers 3. A better fence- and a frame that can take an upgraded fence later on. 4. A good long miter gauge. 5. Metal handwheels. 6. An extra 150# (give or take) of ballast in the form of higher-quality parts and frame.
You don't get dust collection or a huge amount of bragging rights, and it may not start up while balancing a nickel on it's edge, but it's a solid machine that will last forever if it's taken care of. I did a whole pile of research on it and others in the same price range, and it beat out the others, including Grizzly, for price and value by my calculus. The model number reflects the type of fence and extension wings that it comes with- everything else is the same.
One other good option if you need something light and useful is the DeWalt contractor's saw- doesn't look like much, but it's tough, the rack and pinion fence is really nice, and the standouts make it possible to rip sheet goods without assistance (provided you can lift them yourself) We've got one at work, and it's quite a nice machine for $500- next in line to the Delta, in my book. The collapsible stand is very easy to set up as well- kind of a nice feature if space is a concern in your shop.
As far as the HF saw you note goes, think about that for a second. It's 3hp, 263#, "professional grade" and retails for $299? I was pricing motors a week or so back, and a 3hp motor by itself costs about that much. I'd say something in there sounds a bit too good to be true, and probably is.
Good luck and enjoy your new saw!
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Buy it, you'll like it . . . after you own it a few months you can post all the crap that is wrong with it . ..

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Wow.....must be having a real bad hair day there Steve. That will really get you a lot of helpful answers next time around but somehow I don't think that bothers you. All take and no give.

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