Delta tablesaw model 36-670


I am confused about this saw. My local home store has one on clearence for $317, which seems like a great deal. However, I have not been able to find anything on the net for this model number, not even on the Delta site. Is this a cheap version made for home stores? Is it just a base model that isn't actually sold (like the 36-675, which looks the same but with some extras)?
10 inch saw, cast iron table with pressed steel wings, stand, standard Delta fence, 1.5hp motor (110/220).
Any opinions on this?
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gregj wrote:

I don't know this applies here but I'd bet it's the saw that you think it resembles. Borgs commonly will have the model number varied to avoid having to give a discount if the competing Borg carries the same item. "Nobody beats our price".... only applies on the exact model number. This way the borg guarantees nobody will have it.
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The 36-675 currently sells for $500, which would make this a pretty good deal if true. Seems like a little too good?
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I dunno. Home Depot's and Lowe's often mark stuff down to a "too good to be true" level. That's often when I pry open my wallet.
If this style of saw is what you're after, and the one in the store looks like it has all the parts, nothing's broken etc - then I'd say you're Looking a Gift Horse in the Mouth. Grab it and start cutting!
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Good advice Patrick, thats what I'm going to do. The saw is still in the box (they have one more in the box, one on display. The store is in the 78759 zip code, Austin Texas if anyone is interested).
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Just got back from a lil' vacation on Padre myself.
There are times I miss Texas, but come June/July/August - I usually rethink my position.
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Patrick Conroy wrote:

What about say, one of the kinda crappy cheap Craftsman saws if I could get it for <$75? The reviews are not good, but I'm a beginner and couldn't make precise cuts even if my saw could. Seems like a quick way to get an essential piece of equipment in place and start learning, but them's famous last words, aren't they?
M
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The less experience you have, the more you need a saw that will keep its settings, and reliably do what you ask of it. That doesn't mean automatically spending $500+, but it does mean that junk is a waste of money and material and time.
When your tools screw up your project, you tend to stop making projects. If YOU screw up your projects, then it's a learning experience.
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:

excellent point; what's hilarious is that i have bought my share of crappy (hand) tools and still not learned this lesson. i think i'll hunt down the ryobi bt3100 -- mad at myself for missing an opportunity to get one of those last week.
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Matt (in GIAve.2431$Uc2.625@trnddc03) said:
| Patriarch wrote:
|| || ||| What about say, one of the kinda crappy cheap Craftsman saws if I ||| could get it for <$75? The reviews are not good, but I'm a ||| beginner and couldn't make precise cuts even if my saw could. ||| Seems like a quick way to get an essential piece of equipment in ||| place and start learning, but them's famous last words, aren't ||| they? || || The less experience you have, the more you need a saw that will || keep its settings, and reliably do what you ask of it. That || doesn't mean automatically spending $500+, but it does mean that || junk is a waste of money and material and time. || || When your tools screw up your project, you tend to stop making || projects. If YOU screw up your projects, then it's a learning || experience. | | excellent point; what's hilarious is that i have bought my share of | crappy (hand) tools and still not learned this lesson. i think i'll | hunt down the ryobi bt3100 -- mad at myself for missing an | opportunity to get one of those last week.
FWIW, I started out buying inexpensive power tools and had a lot of trouble getting projects to come out right - no matter /how/ carefully I worked. I backed up and worked with hand tools almost exclusively.
Then a situation arose in which I needed to sand all four walls of a room floor to ceiling. I visited my local tool emporium (a Hardware Hank in Rochester, MN) and asked for advice. The sales guy was a woodworker and told me that I could either by several of the cheap sanders (I'd already used up a number of those on earlier projects) or spend the almost $70 for a SpeedBloc. I bought the good sander (feeling a little guilty) and a pile of their best sandpaper, took 'em home, and finish sanded the whole room, floor to ceiling, in less than three hours. I was totally amazed at the difference in performance between that tool and all the sanders I'd ever used before.
I was so amazed that I went back to the store to thank the salesman and we spent about an hour talking about tools and the differences between "homeowner", "contractor" and "commercial" tools - and that conversation radically changed woodworking for me forever.
I bought that sander in 1974. Last year I finally took it in for a tune-up and re-cording (the original cord had petrified). It's not the only finish sander in my shop - but it still does the best job fastest.
It was about a year later, in 1975, that I finally bought a table saw. I looked at all the table saws in all the nearby stores and agonized over the cost; then got on the phone and ordered my 10" Unisauer with two wings, long rails, the Uniguard, and a monsterous tenoning jig.
Last winter I replaced the original cord (which had also petrified - photo in the abpw archive) on the Unisaur. Bought new in 1975, it's still rock solid, vibration free, and wonderfully exact. I've long since gotten over my guilt over spending almost $1200 for the tool and original accessories (that works out to about $40/year) and I suspect that it'll outlast me by at least a half-century.
When I was shopping for the table saw, one of the guys where I worked suggested I try thumping candidate saws with my fist and "listening to what they had to say". I did that and found the exercise instructive. I'll pass that suggestion along to you - it's not the definitive test, but it sure narrows the field quickly :-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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On Sun, 26 Jun 2005 15:30:23 GMT, Matt

Less than $75 might be pushing it, but mine is a little cheap saw, and it's done a lot of very nice work for me. It's better to get what you can and get started than it is to worry about what some guy on the internet has to say about it, after all... :)
The first table saw I every used was a $50 house-brand from one of the big-box stores a guy had on a jobsite. We just sat it on a table and used it without knowing any better. No expensive fence or ultra-smooth industrial blades in that thing, but I managed to do three years worth of finish carpentry on it, and it all came out just fine. You can always upgrade later.
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about it by looking at the parts list for one of the other 36-6xx saws. I may have a previous Delta catalog which lists it, but I can't seem to find the catalog right now. This line is made in Taiwan. Jim

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Go for it...
I bought one for $317, it's a 36-649 model (aka 36-650). From what I can tell the 36-675 is the base unit to many of the lower end contractor saws. A $599 saw at Woodcraft has the same base unit.
The different models are for the accessories, table and fence types. I'm not in love with the steel extensions but I can change them when I want to cast iron for $69.00 each plus shipping. The T2 fence is decent, not a Beismeyer mind you but good enough. The motor is good and gives a 15 amp circuit a workout on startup, I'm going to move it to 220 volts on a new circuit soon. The original belt sucks and caused a lot of vibration but a new link belt (highly recommended) fixed that.
The arbor is too short for my liking but it is the only arbor offered and the official word from Delta is to leave off the outside washer for big dado stacks (over 5/8" or so).
Overall I'd give it a good rating especially at $317, it's light years ahead of my older Ridgid ($550) portable. It's heavier, much quieter and just generally more solid all around. I only wish I'd done it sooner...
Bring a strong friend with you, it's too heavy to do alone. I did it alone but was sore for a few days!
Phil Davis 247PalmBeachRE.com
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