Delta Sawbuck question


When the Delta Sawbuck came out quite a few years ago, I thought it was a pretty cool design. At the time, however, I couldn't afford one, and never had the occasion to try one out. Now I see that they are no longer being made. Were there flaws in the tool that made it lose popularity or just what happened? The concept is intriguing, a tool that combines the features of a mitre box and radial arm saw, if I have it right.
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But that was before sliding mitre saws were available.
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Ya can still get one on ebay: http://search.ebay.com/search/search.dll?cgiurl=http%3A%2F%2Fcgi.ebay.com%2Fws%2F&fkr=1&from=R8&satitle lta+sawbuck&category0
cm

http://search.ebay.com/search/search.dll?cgiurl=http%3A%2F%2Fcgi.ebay.com%2Fws%2F&fkr=1&from=R8&satitle lta+sawbuck&category0
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I had one of the earlier models - the one with two rails and a perforated cast aluminum frame. It was a good tool. I'd probably still have it if it hadn't been ripped off. It had some quirks, but there weren't any real problems with it. I always wished that the table could have turned the full ninety degrees so you could do ripping.
They seem to be still in demand. If you do a Google you'll see a fair number of results from people looking to buy one, or buy parts for one.
Here's a guy who built his into his shop - never saw that done before.
http://image05.webshots.com/5/6/53/52/61965352bOeceS_ph.jpg
R
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I have one, with the solid table top, not the perforated top. I have abused it often enough, but I take care of my tools. It has served me well for, I suppose, 15 years. I think it is now just a touch out of square at the moment, but I still use it on a regular basis, especially when I am doing a project away from the established shop. I always wondered why Delta didn't orignally mount a 10" saw on this stand. Yep, the sliding miters upstaged the sawbuck. I've never had to replace or repair any pieces or parts (other than blade). Everything is still in good working order.
On another topic, I went to a State surplus auction in Baton Rouge this past weekend to purchase 2 upholstery sewing machines. There was a somewhat old large 3 phase Cincinnati table saw, a large 3 phase Cincinnati band saw and a large 3 phase Cincinnati radial arm saw. I didn't inspect for model numbers. Though they all looked to need some cleaning, they looked very good and all the mechanisms worked with minimum drag. The band saw was in the worst of physical shape. I didn't need any of these tools, so I didn't bid on any of them. They would have been nice impressive fixtures in anyone's shop. Lots of bidders/guys, there, looking at them prior to the sale. The RA saw went for $2100, the BS went for $300, and the TS went for $250. I am still sick in the stomach for not bidding on these items. Surely, I could have found a relative or friend that would have appreciated having these major tools.
Sonny
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On 16 Mar 2006 16:29:04 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

No flaws, it was a good tool and still in demand today. A great contractors tool for outside finish and siding and precise enough for inside trim. The Sawbuck was discontinued because although the volume was steady, it was low enough that both the motor supplier and the supplier of the fixed and rotating tables (the sheet molded compound tables) did not want to fool with it. Raised the component price exhorbitantly or forced the carrying of a years worth of inventory.
Frank
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<No flaws, it was a good tool and still in demand today. A great contractors tool for outside finish and siding and precise enough for inside trim. The Sawbuck was discontinued because although the volume was steady, it was low enough that both the motor supplier and the supplier of the fixed and rotating tables (the sheet molded compound tables) did not want to fool with it. Raised the component price exhorbitantly or forced the carrying of a years worth of inventory.>
The thing about the sawbuck that turned me on was that it could crosscut a much wider board. Maybe it has been phased out by the sliders, but can any one of them cut a 16" wide board or piece of plywood? I'm lucky to have a long-standing friendship with the owners of a high quality custom millwork shop and whenever I need to work on one of my own commercial projects there, I can. They have a beautiful Omga radial saw that will crosscut a full 24", and talk about a timesaver! I've often thought that a light, portable unit along the lines of the sawbuck could be made to have the same capicity. A tool like that would have almost the same impact on the small woodworking shop that the portable planer has, in my opinion. What new woodworking tool designs would you like to see on the market? Good topic. I'd have to say: 1. Deep cut Sawbuck. 2. 3/8" right angle hammer drill.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

For the Sawbuck: 10" blade, ability to turn 90 degrees to rip, height adjustment of blade for dados and rabbeting. Small refrigerator built in, foot massager. That should do it.
R
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