Delta Planer Cleaning


Delta recommended Kerosene for the knives and metal rollers. I don't want to have kerosene in shop. What would be a suitable substitute.
Thks...Dan in Canada
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Lamp oil, fuel oil, diesel fuel, WD-40, mineral spirits, gas. Easier to move the planer out of the shop to do the job than use less effective solvents.
Watch those knives. I've heard of people getting cut cleaning them. Not me, of course, just stories I've heard. Yeah, that's it, it was some other guy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of course, Lamp oil, fuel oil, and diesel fuel are all functionally kerosene. We all have much more dangerous stuff with which we clean the bathroom, generally speaking.
Ed's right about those knives. I also happen to know a guy, really well in fact,...
Whatever you do, never, ever mention the use of acetone here. DAMHIKT.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Patriarch wrote:

    honest,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And even with that you need to be careful.
I borrowed my sister's car to get my daughter from Schiphol airport for my Dad's funeral. Since it was low on fuel I gassed up at the Amstelveen service station. Got to the Airport OK, and was about 1/3 of the way back to my Dad's home when the engine started coughing. I could just coast into a service station halfway to Utrecht and realized what I had done wrong. Filled the car with regular, while the engine expected diesel. ANWB (AAA equivalent) was there within 45 min and pumped the car dry, then we filled it with diesel and had the ANWB guy tow us to start the engine (4 or 5 speed manual - just shift into second and gently let the clutch in). Engine ran rough the first 20 or so miles, but fine thereafter. We made it on time from Wageningen to the crematorium in Beuningen.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

(Reporting what I was told by Delta support.)
Any 'light petroleum distallate' will work just fine Naptha Mineral spirits lanp oil etc., even gasoline.
Delta recommends kerosene because it is the least expensive of the class, and generally readily available.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Jun 2005 17:28:41 -0400, "Dan Jefferson"

Why don't you want kerosene in the shop?
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Take the planer outside? is it portable?
Dan Jefferson wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

mind. <g>
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why not have a little kerosene in the shop? What you'll use to clean your planer is such a small amount that a good fart is probably about as much of a fire/explosion threat as it is. You have to work pretty hard to get fire out of kerosene (put a flame right to it) and you just about can't make it explode. Exercise a little common sense when you clean your planer, and you would have no problems using kerosene.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He'd probably be more comfortable with lamp oil instead of kerosene. Maybe you should suggest that to Dan.
todd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can loosen up pitch and tar etc. with butter or olive oil and clean up the mess with rubbing alcohol..... but why would you want to? Kerosene is the safest and most effective... a little on a rag goes a long way.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Jun 2005 17:28:41 -0400, "Dan Jefferson"

You can keep the kerosene elsewhere--perhaps under the kitchen sink. A small amount of kerosene in the shop should be safe. Kerosene protects metal from rust and it is fairly non-toxic--not nearly as flammable as some oil finishes or a can of WD40. You can use it to clean your hands from tar, grease, oil-based finishes, etc. I don't like to deviate from a manufacturer's recommendation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.