Delta Hybrid TS 36-717


I have recently gotten into woodworking, and built my own woodworking bench and more recently my wife and I completed our first project. We have minimal tools and I have been looking for a good table saw. So far, I'm leaning towards the Delta Hybrid saw, model 36-717 with the Beis fence. I realize these haven't been out long, but I'm wanting to get opinions from the more experienced people out there on my thinking. I checked Woodcraft's website and noticed it said they no longer carry it...so I called them to see why. They said there was a problem with them and the manufacturer was redoing them and would be "re-releasing" them sometime in September I believe. Anyway, I'm hoping to keep the purchase under $1000 so I still have a little money left for the accessories like blade alignment tool and whatever else I figure out that I have to have with a table saw. The reasons I have tentatively decided on this particular saw is because it has a full cabinet, the beis fence, and has dust collection. It seems like a good middle ground between the contractor saws and a cabinet saw. Does this seem like a good choice?
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lance wrote:

If it's the one I'm thinking of - haven't followed the model numbers that close but it's about $1100? - what I have heard is that although it's advertised, its availability is still sketchy. Thus, I have not seen many reviews of it by current owners/users.
OTOH, if you take a look at Sears Craftsman version which regularly sells for around $975 but typically can be found on sale for much less (someone said that it could be had for around $600 with a really good sale in combo with the Craftsman Membership Card)you'll find what appears to be the same saw.
I DID look at the Craftsman mentioned above quite closely and attempted to compare it to the equivalent Delta which, I'm sure, is the one you're looking at. Very nice saw.
If the two saws aren't coming off the same production line, I'd be very surprised.
Don't think I've seen anything but good reviews on the Craftsman and so, I suspect, the same should hold true with the Delta.
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Looking at on-line pictures, the Delta 36-717 looks a lot like the Craftsman 00922124000 which I purchased last December.
Superficial differences are the Delta supports the wooden table extension with a couple of legs. The Sears model uses the fence rail for support which has worked well for my needs.
I paid just less than $700 with the Christmas sale price and then another 10% off for the Craftsman club discount. I have not seen it at this price since last Christmas.
The Sears saw is generally sturdy, although it did skimp on the height/angle handle attachments. I would have preferred a beefier handle, but to be honest, the adjustment is very smooth and the design is adequate. I have not seen the Delta saw "live", but I would buy the Sears saw again, especially at the price I paid for it.
So far the saw is meeting my woodworking needs. Whichever saw you buy, I would get a good quality blade. I gave away the blade which came with the saw and purchased a Forrest Woodworker II.
Dave Paine.

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Hi Lance,
Check out the Grizzly line. I upgraded to a 1023SL this past January. I was considering the Sears with the Bies fence, but on inspecting it, I was a little disappointed - a little lacking in beef and I thought it had flimsy handwheels (the Griz has these silky smooth heavy ones that are a pleasure to turn.)
I could not be more pleased with the Griz - I also added a WWII blade. It is an awsome combo for around $1K - around $2/pound! Their shop fox fence is rock solid & true - it has not disappointed either.
Lou
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Wow, that's a beaut! What type of woodworking did you get into? That's a pretty hefty table saw for anyone who is recently into woodworking.
Then again, it should last you a LONG time.
Jack
lance wrote:

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Well, I am wanting to make anything really, but would eventually like to make my own bedroom furniture among other things. I realize it may be a step-up from what most people start with, but that is precisely why I was looking at it. I don't really want to have to upgrade. I don't think I need a professional level saw, but would like a good one that I am not going to outgrow as a hobbyist. After looking at the 1023SL that Lou recommened, I think I now have a contender, and will now need to decide between that one and the delta 36-717.
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lance.... I have sold and used Delta for years and I am a big Delta fan. I have always been able to get good service and parts are normally available. Support your local Wood Craft store. They will give you good service after the sale.
Mike
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Hi (again) Lance,
If you contact Grizzly, they will put you in contact with someone in your area that owns their saw, so that you can take a look/feel.
If you google Grizzly here on the wreck, I think that you will find their support & reputation are very positive.
I bought my Delta 14" bandsaw at my local WW Warehouse a couple years ago - they're out of business now. Sucks cause I really liked that store. It is a great BS tho.
Same guys are now working at the new Woodcraft. Bought a Jet sander from them. Still great guys - they just don't remember selling me that BS!
I happened to be in a Sears (Hardware) store today, putting a payment on my monthly. Took a stroll through their tool area and looked (again) at their TS's. If you could grab that $969 job for $600+, then that's a good deal - probably what it is worth. The next model down was listed for around $650 I think, so at around $500, it would be good too.
Me? I'd still buy the Griz for $1K, beacause it is just that much better IMHO.
I'm retired - never sold nothin' but paint/burgers when I was in college - 40 yrs ago :-( .
I bought my 1023SL after almost 20 years with a decent but not great contractor's saw.
A good TS will make your work a lot more enjoyable and accurate.
Get the WWII too!
FWIW
Lou
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Snipped.

I think Lou is spot on here. I have not seen the Delta, but I have looked at the Sears models. They are competant saws which are much better than the 80's craftsman contractor saw with which I was sadly all too well acquainted.
If you can get a the high-end sears for $700, I would say that it is an excellent value and it will do what you need. But for $1K the Griz gets my vote because it is a "real" cabinet saw and it wil lbe that much nicer to use.
BTW, you do not *need* fancy tools to set up a a saw well. Do buy the full kerf WWII.
-Steve
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I thought getting the blade exactly parallel to the miter slot and fence was really critical to a well performing saw. In thinking this, I assumed I would need a tool to align these, which would probably not be very cheap. Is there a relatively easy way to get a new saw ready to use without buying more tools? If so, could you explain, or point me to a resource that explains? Thanks in advance. I'm now leaning much more towards the Grizzly.
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Yes it is. You can use a combination square.
Raise the blade to its highest setting. Set the fence of the combination square in the slot and extend the rule until it touches the front tooth of the blade. Lock the rule in place. Mark this tooth with a pencil. Rotate the blade back until that tooth is just above the table, but in the back position. Tweek your blade angle (on a cab saw this is done by moving the saw top, on a contractor saw you move the trunions) until the same tooth just brushes the rule of the combination square in both the front and back positions.
A dial indicator will let you measure very small distances. You really don't want to measure, you just want to make two distances equal.
You probably want to have a decent engineer's square to set the 90 and 45 degree bevel stops.
Blade to fence is even easier. Just use some fixed-width piece of metal (like the metal rule from your combination square) and use that to measure the distance from the "reference tooth" in front and back pisitions to the fence. Do this using the 1" dimmension of the ruler (not the 12" way).
Let me know if I need to clarify that.
Regards,
Steve

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Thank you everyone for your wonderful insight and advice. It is much appreciated. I have talked to the wife and think we've decided to get the 1023SL. One more question, if anyone knows...is it easy to add a table to fill out the space to the right where the rails extend past the wing? The Delta hybrid saw I was looking at came with this already, and that is one thing I would like to have on the Grizzly. I'm sure I could just put an MDF piece in there to fit, but is it really that easy? I don't want to get the 1023SLX which adds the extension table because it would be too long. I'm in half of a 2 car garage, so I'd like to keep the standard length rails that come with the saw. Thanks!
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Hi Lance,
Funny you should mention that space to the right of the saw. I have installed a router table in the space. What I did was drill 1/4 inch holes for bolts - two in the wing edge and 1 in the center of each rail. Then I attached an oak frame with bolts - level with the wing. Added some cleats inside and dropped in a piece of melamine which I routed out to hold a plate that I got from Rockler (around $50-$60). I'm still tweaking it - between projects. Of course, you could just as easily drop in a piece of melamine or whatever with no hole if you just wanted an extension.
Good luck with your new saw!
Lou

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Almost. Use melamine, the surface will slicker, especially after you wax it a bit.... oh yeah put paste wax on your shopping list (not car wax, the stuff for floors and furniture) on your shopping list. You will use it for all sorts of things in your shop.
The melamine alone will be a little weak (prone to sagging). Add a 1x2 apron and one crossbar and you'll be all set.
Cheers,
Steve
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Lance,
Check out:
http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G1023SL&&gid7D36D E-DE48-42FD-8473-F6443CA273AB&site=grizzly
(watch the wrap)
The manual (pdf) explains how to square/align everything if necessary.
My 1023SL required very little tweaking out of the box.
Lou
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Were you, for example, to purchase a good, 6" combination square, say from Starrett, you would not only have what you need to properly align your saw, but would have a tool you would likely use almost every time in the shop.
Patriarch
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