Delta contractor blade hits insert

For the first time since I bought the Delta Contractors saw a year ago I am trying to cut a 45 degree mitre in the ends of the jewelry box sides. However when I tilt the blade to 45 degrees, the blade hits on the insert. I noticed that when the blade is at 90 degrees the blade is not centered in the slot in the insert, but I don't see where there is anything I can do to move it over to the left a little bit. At 45 the blade doesn't hit by much but definitely hits. Don't see anything in the manual about an auxiliary insert for cutting 45s so I what's the problem?
Rich Durkee
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(Rich Durkee) wrote:

If you're using a blade stabilizer, you have it on the wrong side of the blade. If you're not using a stabilizer, I'm stumped -- misalignment, maybe?
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Is the off center condition such that turning the insert around would give the clearance you need?
Someone mentioned stabilizers. Obviously tou could use a stabilizer and/or a washer to move the blade a bit to get clearance. Wilson
(Rich Durkee) wrote:

maybe?
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The trunnion needs to be moved over so that the blade will clear the insert. OR you can use a file and widen the slot so that the blade does not hit. If your saw is doing a great job at providing smooth cuts when ripping, I would make the slot wider. If the results of your cuts could use some improvement I would move the trunnion and realign the blade parallel with the miter slot. The later being the correct way to fix the problem.

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Contractors saws have the trunion attached to the underside of the table, usually 4 bolts. Loosen the 4 bolts and shift the trunion in the appropriate direction, then make sure the blade is parallel to the miter slots. In some cases, the bolt holes don't have enough slop to get it centered. In that case, call Delta if it's new, or get out the file if it's not.
--
Ross
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Ross & Leon make good points.
I'd do the trimming on a home built insert, or a cheap, replacement insert from a dealer, rather than the original, should you choose that route.
In fact, a zero-clearance, or near-zero clearance insert is often a pretty good addition, if you provide a splitter option.
Patriarch
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Your trunions may have enough room to allow you to center the blade or at least move away from the insert enough that it doesn't contact. If everything else is spot on, parallel to the miter gauge slots and so forth, I'd just make a custom, zero clearance insert out of hardwood. I haven't had the stock insert in my contractor's saw in years. I kid myself that an insert for the dado head that has a slot cut by the dado I'm using gives less fuzz/tearout on the underside of the work. Does seem that way, though.
bob g.
Rich Durkee wrote:

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This happened to me out of the box with mine. I got lucky and could move the bolts as described in another post here. In fact, I couldn't tilt my blade to 45 until I made this adjustment or the insert would have gone flying at my face. Not good...

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I had the identical problem with my five year old Delta CS. Solved it by using the Delta insert made for dado blades. Needed one of these anyway so it was not a big deal.
I don't know how you would make a zero-clearance insert for 45 degrees. The problem I see is that the usual process for making the insert calls for raising the spinning blade up through the insert while it is held down by the fence. If you try this with the blade set at an angle two bad things are going to happen. The first is obvious and that is the entry cut into in the insert will not be zero clearance because raising the blade vertically will chew up the bottom of the insert and then exit the top leaving a larger opening than zero clearance. The second one is really bad and this is that if you use the fence to hold down the insert you must be sure to put it on the side opposite the blade direction and there just may not be enough "bite" on this narrower side to keep the insert clamped in place. I suppose there are other ways to keep the insert immobile but overall I just cannot see this as practical. Anyone else care to chime in here?
Rich Durkee wrote:

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wrote:

heh... never done it, eh?

no problems plunge cutting through any of my zero clearance bevel inserts....

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Love the cynicism!! Boy, it is always fun to belittle someone else and show your own brilliance in the bargain. Why do you need to try and make someone else look small, is it to make yourself look large? If your comments are intended to shed light on the problem it might be helpful to all who read the NG to actually outline something of value. Did you enjoy your self-satisfied smirk??
snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

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wrote:

yep.
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Really?
You are guessing here... right? The blade when tilted at a 45 degree setting DOES NOT travel vertically. You better take another look at how the blade travels when set at a bevel.
The second one is

Wrong again.
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<...previous quote snipped...>
On my Delta contractor saw, and every other tilting arbor table saw I have seen, up & down motion of the blade is perpendicular to the arbor, i.e, the blade will stay within it's own plane when raised/lowered, regardless of the tilt angle. And as you say, there are other ways to retain an insert besides moving the fence over it.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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DIYGUY wrote:

I don't know about your saw but mine does a pretty good job of moving the blade in the "plane" of the blade regardless of angle. IOW, cuts a pretty narrow slot by raising the blade regardless of angle. Place the fence on the side of the insert where the blade is NOT going to exit. In the case of my saw, the Jet JT10, the "safe" side is also the wide side. YMMV
bob g. The second one is

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