Delta bandsaw motor replacement

A neighbor gave me a Delta model 28-185 band saw that the start capacitor was burned up on. He had removed it and no longer has it. I took the info off the motor and got a start capacitor from an electrical supply house. It burned up almost imediately. Went to another supply house and got another capacitor that they recommended. Same result. I think the motor probably needs replacement.
1. Is it worth replacing, or should I just scrap the whole thing?
2. Where would I find a replacement? IIRC to get a replacement you need to have the motor frame number. I can't find a frame number on this thing to save my life. I can't afford a new bandsaw right now, so that is out of the question.
Thanks for any advise.
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The Cross-eyed Barber wrote:

Capacitors are insulators, and usually fail from overvoltage. Is it wired in right?
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You need to take the old motor out anyway. Remove it and take it with you. The nameplate should be on the motor telling horsepower, voltage, phase, amp draw, etc. The biggies are going to be motor rotation (usually reversible) and shaft diameter so you can re use your pulley. These can often be reworked to run with any old motor and pulley like a dryer motor, etc. It shows to be a .2 horsepower motor.
About all the frame size does for you is allow the bolts to fit that hold it on the machine. Most of these machines are fairly adjustable about motor frame bolt up except for the ones held by their neck and I'm afraid yours might be.
Go to: Grainger Harbor Freight Johnstone Supply Yellow pages for electric motor rewinding. If you start here, they may be able to diagnose yours. You may simply need bearings.
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Word of caution on using a replacement motor, DO NOT use a motor from a dryer, washer, sump pump,or blower motor etc. because they usually have resets in them, It would be VERY dangerous to install such a motor on a power tool for this reason. JMHO
DJ
DanG wrote:

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Isn't this one of the little 9" bentchtop models? Whatever you decide, keep in mind that that the entire saw only costs about $100 new. My advice is that unless you can find the parts for free or close to it, don't bother.
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The first thing to do is to talk to Delta direct see http://www.deltamachinery.com/index.asp?e You can probably get your electric motor rebuild locally. Or after talking (although you saw appear to be discontinued) to Delta they may have an electrical motor to replace your or recommend a service depot. I have dealt with them before and found them to be very knowledgeable and accommodating. Good luck
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If it needs a start capacitor, it may also have an extra set of start windings, and these will be wired through some sort of centrifugal switch. If that switch is not opening, the start windings will not be disengaged after the motor reaches speed, and it will burn out the capacitor fairly quickly.
The switch will be mounted on the motor shaft, under the cover at one end (probably the non-business end). It will have some sort of spring assembly that will close the switch when the motor is not rotating, but as the motor spins up the switch will "click" open.
Could be cover in dust and not moving, the contacts burned and not releasing. May be able to replace the switch, or clean it.
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Have you checked the centrifugal switch on the motor shaft? It's supposed to open the contacts when the motor gets up to speed. If it doesn't, it can burn up the starting cap.
Art

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First check the motor. For the others - no pulleys, no chance of 220V if you look it up. Appears to be a 1/3 HP washing machine motor type by the 4-point face mount.
Probably enough to check the windings to make sure they're not shorted and blow the dirt out while you're there. Then open and clean the points on the centrifugal switch with a bit of 320 SiC sandpaper. If all checks, might be the capacitor, but it might be a start/run type, so anything less will burn quickly. When you rotate by hand, it should start.
Not worth the price of a motor, maybe a capacitor.
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Funny thing about is it that Delta sells a replacement motor (part # 1345011) for $155.09, more than the original purchase price of the saw.
The Cross-eyed Barber wrote:

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Thanks to all who replied. I will clean out the motor and check the cintrifugal switch as suggested. The start capacitors are only a few dollars. If that doesn't do it, I guess I'll have to get a new band saw one of these days. Thanks.
On Sun, 21 Jan 2007 12:34:47 -0500, The Cross-eyed Barber

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Is it a simple start capacitor? Verify by trying to run the motor with a hand start. If it's a start/run configuration, putting a simple start in it will result in failures as you have experienced.
Note the PSC, CSIR and CSCR configurations available. http://www.iprocessmart.com/leeson/leeson_singlephase_article.htm
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I'm starting to wonder if it is a start/run configuration. Not sure. Yes, I can give it a hand start and seems to run ok, but does seem weak. Not sure of this because I have no experience with band saw other than this one. I took the motor apart and did not find any kind of switch. The wires from the capaciter join right into the bundle with the wires from the cord. I think I'll just save up and buy a new band saw. While it's off the saw, I may take it to a shop and have them at least take a look at it if they'll do it on the cheap.
It is a 1/5 hp, 2.5 amp single phase.

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At 2.5 amp, it will be weak. If you can't cut wood it is probably time to cut your losses.
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Sounds like a PSC configuration. It would be a good application for it.
Not that I'd chase the problem, but rather start shopping 14" saws.
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