Delta 14" Band Saw - Poor Dust Collection


Hi,
Is there anything that's needed to improve the dust collection on the Delta 14" Bandsaw (28-206)? I noticed that there is a 1/2" gap between the bottom swing-away door and the frame casting. I have been told that for effective dust collection, the unit needs to be sealed, in as much as possible, while still allowing for a proper intake volume. If that's true, I can see that at far as my Delta is concerned, the dust collection may be ineffective and is, in fact, seems poor. I am currently using a Portable Jet 1 HP DC unit with a short hose.
It collects about 1/2 of the dust the bandsaw produces - and that is from ripping a 3/4 piece of plywood. I'd hate to see what happens on a resaw.
I have thought about using some form of weather stripping to seal the lower door, but I figured it may be better to ask the group first.
Thanks in advance.
SBL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
even the delta aftermarket front collector sucks!! the best I have seen is a home made one that's a round hole cut in the lower door with a fitting(PVC) that connects to the dust collector.
len
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try some 1 1/4 PVC with a slit in the end for the blade to run through, clamped under the table so that it pulls the sawdust from the area immediately below the thrust bearing. Keeps a lot of the stuff from running down to the bottom.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
I have the 14" Ridgid, which is pretty much the same saw... I took out the "under the blade" port.. it held the damn lower door open 1/4"!
I drilled a 4" hole in the bottom of the lower door and put a DC port on it.. I honestly don't know how well it would work WITHH the DC on it, I've been lazy and used the shop vac with a 2 1/2" drop down.. not good, but MUCH better than the little port it came with...
Note: the door is NOT cheap sheet metal, bring the big boys toys.. *g*

Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cut a 4" hole in the lower door and add a 4" toilet flange. Your dust collector hose will hook to that easily. Collects most of the dust.
Tim

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I solved a similar problem on my Jet 14" BS. All it takes is a couple of PVC attachments. I've posted pictures on ABPW.
1. large pipe is connected to a dust collector.
2. Top of wheel is a piece of PVC pipe, cut in half (long ways) with both ends capped. This focuses the dust to the large pipe.
3. Bottom of wheel is a piece of PVC pipe, heated and pushed into saw opening. After it cooled I removed it and cut an opening to collect the dust.
I us a head gun and large coffee can to heat up the PVC to soften it enough to reshape it.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for responding.
This particular unit is "supposed" to have a built in collection outlet, but it seems insufficient. I believe that the issue is the fact that there is a loss of vacume because of the gap that exists between the door and the frame casing. I calculate a total of 9" square of area around the door for the free flow of air. That seems like it would seriously degrade the peformance of the dust collection.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 7 Mar 2006 21:26:16 -0500, "news.east.cox.net"

I have the same saw, but I don't have any dust collection yet. On my saw the fit of the bottom door to the casting is actually pretty good, maybe an 1/8th at most. I'm not sure how you could have such a big gap and get it to close. I put up a picture of what it looks like here:
http://www.krtwood.com/bs2.jpg
It's fairly evident in my case without any dust collection most of the sawdust is already outside the saw before getting down to the DC hookup. There's hardly any dust building up inside the wheel covers. There's that plastic flap that's supposed to block most of the space, but there's all kinds of open space under the table. I think you are much better off getting your own connection higher up and closer to the blade, and at an angle so you aren't trying to pull it 90 degrees from where it was travelling.
On my old ryobi they had the port at the back of the bottom wheel. They also had sort of vanes inside the port, I'm not exactly sure what that accomplishes, but again without anything hooked up to it most of the dust came out the port on its own.
http://www.krtwood.com/bs1.jpg
So if it were me I would first try to get as much as possible below the table and then get the rest from the back of the lower wheel. The stock port is just in a lousy location, but it's not going to cost you much to try to weatherstrip the door to see if that works well enough for you.
-Leuf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I put a hole in the door for a 4" hose. but reall I thionk the best place to catch the dust is right under the table. my new shopfox has a good 4" connection right befroe the bottom wheel but it also has two flat pcies of metal that cover up the openeng around the blade. I think it would be better to not have them so the dust was not blocked at all if it all did not follow the blade down.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.