Degloss additive?

Is there something I can add to gloss lacquer to turn it into semi-gloss? If so, what is it called?
I have four gallons of gloss Deft that I got for 5% off at a local hardware store that was discontinuing the product. I am about out of the semi-gloss that I bought there, so I would like to kill the gloss on this stuff.
Any Ideas?
--
Al Reid

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I've heard "talcum powder", but haven't tried it. You'd want unscented unless you want your workpiece to smell like a baby's changing table.
Dave Hinz
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Dave Hinz wrote:

Yech, who would buy talcum powder that smells like baby poop?
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Once it's thoroughly dry a gentle rub with 0000 steel wool does the trick nicely.
Art

what is it called?

that was discontinuing the product. I am about

this stuff.

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Good point, also gives you the option to go back to gloss later, where putting something in the finish makes that never an option.
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wrote:

Fair enough. I just thought I had seen some kind of additive and couldn't remember where or what it was called. Looks like elbow grease is the organic additive I'll need to use.
Thanks!
--
Al Reid

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use the gloss for all the coats except the last one

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Charles Spitzer wrote:

Or use a satin poly varnish for the top coat.
But I think I have heard of an additive to de-gloss gloss. Did you ask the dealer where you bought the paint? They might add de-glosser free of charge.
Josie
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go to the nearest autobody and paint supply there are many products available depending on the paint base and it's a pretty common process in the automotive world ... Camo jobs and the like are generally shiny paint that are glossed down when they mix the paint.
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Al Reid wrote:

You can add a "flattener" such as that made by Behlen and sold by Liberon.
http://www.liberonsupply.com/liberon.html
"FLATTENER REDUCES THE GLOSS OF A FINISH Flattening agent for lacquer. Transparent liquid additive used to reduce the gloss of a finish. One gallon of gloss lacquer finish requires 16 ounces of Flattener to convert it to a flat finish. A satin sheen requires only 8 ozs. of Flattener added to a gallon of gloss lacquer. # B610-01006 - Quart .......................................................... $11.98"
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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semi-gloss? If so, what is it called?

.......................................................... $11.98"

Thanks! That's what I was looking for.
-- Al Reid
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 13:36:34 -0400, "Al Reid"
Best way is to rub the shine out with pumice when it's dry and hard.
Quickest and easiest way is to mix a flattening powder in with the wet varnish. Talcum powder works, as does almost anything plain and powdery. If you use something hard like silex (airfloat silica) though, it becomes impossible to sand it. Try the talcum powder, but experiment first - a couple of oz in a gallon is enough to start making a difference.
--
Smert' spamionam

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On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 22:05:40 +0100, Andy Dingley

I prefer to degloss varnish with 0000 steel wool and paste wax. Wouldn't that also work on lacquer if one was careful? I know lacquer is thinner than varnish.
- Yea, though I walk through the valley of Minwax, I shall stain no Cherry. http://diversify.com
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 17:33:08 -0700, Larry Jaques

It works great! Lacquer is usually sprayed, while varnish is often brushed. Enough coats need to be sprayed to ensure a decent build before rubbing.
Barry
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 13:36:34 -0400, "Al Reid"

Don't forget that early coats of a finish should be gloss. Flattening agents cloud finishes. Only the last one or two coats should be semi-gloss.
Use that gloss stuff to build finishes.
Barry
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sherman williams sells a product called "ok-412". you should be able to get in a local store. if you need a product number i'll dig it out. bob
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