Decorative waves in cedar shingle patterns - how to do this?

I built a grand plywood dumpster off to th side of the driveway (it looks like those metal ones but is wood and has a weight-bananced lid - our garbage service is $65/mo, you have to take the cans weeksly to the end of the road and I am often away to boot - and want to shingle it in those amazing wavy line patterns often seen on old building in england. Does anyone know how this is done? Does one shorten the shingles in that part of a course, does one add multiple shingles underneath a course, to get the 3-D and ripple effect or what? I thought I'd start by applying the shingles with hot glue to see how it might come together, then take it all apart and nail/staple once it looks satisfactory, but any thought or references would be appreciated...Thanks for any help.
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http://www.fullmoondesigns.com/FancyShingles/Page2.html
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I've done a few cedar roofs, but haven't done the type of work you're after. You can expose 18 inch machine cut cedar shingles as much as 7.5 inches to the weather on a vertical surface. So go nuts with the layers, just making sure to cover the preceeding course's key(the space between the shingles). On a pitch of 4 in 12 to "steep mansard", the exposure should be no more than 5 inches. The real pertinant instructions usually come with every bundle of cedar(starters, fastener type, etc.). Tom ><b

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If you want asphalt fiberglass shingles, they are called architectural shingles. -- Jim in NC
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replying to Barclay, Steve wrote:

@ barclayjoan To make a wave pattern in a sidewall application you begin by defining the wave you want, a repeating wave, same frequency and duration repeating with 5" exposure to weather would require two different sets of shingle cuts. Eg. a wave that is 10" from peak to trough vertically and 2' from peak to trough horizontally would build like this: Connect the two segments of the circle to create the full wave ~ onto sheets of plywood so you have 4 eight foot patterns to work with 2 for A and 2 for B courses, center of the peak goes to center of the plywood. I like the 2' reflection because of the ease of the repetition and the resulting 5 7/8" shingles look good. Buy 3x the amount of shingles necessary to cover the area, set aside any shingle less than 5 7/8, rip the remaining to 5 7/8, this allows a 3/16-1/4" keyway, depending on the finish of the shingle, and proper nailing with no shiners. Divide the patterns into sections reflecting the shingles plus space for keyway, start from the center and remember to offset pattern #B by half of a shingle in order to provide for proper overlaps in each course. There are your wave courses, 'A' should be 8 shingles and 'B' should be 9 shingles, cut it with a band saw, jig saw, scroll saw, cnc, or router with a jig. Its quite tedious, but I use a router to plow out the area for the keyway and glue in a dividing strip to create the space between shingles, the exposed portion of the strip will be 1/16" smaller than the thickness of the bottom of the shingles. Take the second A pattern plywood (yes all of the plywood patterns are the same, but label them anyway, you will thank me) and create a sandwich, slide the shingles into the resulting slots and use a cutoff bit with a top or bottom guide bearing and have at it. You need to make sure that the thickest part of your shingle is still left on the shingle so that none of your cut shingles are shorter than what you started with. This will keep the wall dry and while it may not look like it, you maintain the triple overlap of the shingles. I mark the top of each shingle with its placement in the pattern, A1-A8: B1-B9 box them up and send them to be prefinished. If your willing to take this on, you should already know how to start a wall so Im leaving that out. But level lines do not lie to you. Kind of fancy for a dumpster but looks great on a beach house gable. Sorry for the 12 year delay in answering!
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