Decent cordless circular saw

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On Sun, 16 Dec 2007 08:13:49 -0800 (PST), Hoosierpopi

At least now I have no idea on what I am to do. Jesse
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Jesse wrote:

Why not ask him what he wants to do?
But when you run the numbers, an 18v cordless saw runs 200 bucks minimum, including the charger and a battery. Lithium ion is going to cost you 350 or so. Add another hundred bucks for a spare 18v battery or 150 for lithium ion and you're talking 300-500 bucks. Then you need either more batteries or an inverter to run the charger from the car electrical system--that's another hundred bucks or so, so you're at 400-600 bucks. A 3 KW generator can be had for under 300 bucks and it can be used for a lot of things other than sawing.
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--John
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On Sun, 16 Dec 2007 15:45:25 -0500, "J. Clarke"

decision to them. The cordless may become a snow machine but I'm OK with that. Thanks for all the input. Jesse
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Does he already have a cordless drill? If so, and it's 18V, you might be able to find the matching saw as a tool-only purchase on-line. That's how I bought my Dewalt circular saw, and that's how I'm getting the reciprocating saw that my wife is going to buy me for Christmas.
When you Google the brand you are looking for, include the words "tool only" and see what you get.
If he doesn't have a 18V drill, then perhaps he really does need a decent kit - drill, saw, etc.
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"Jesse" wrote:

I have a small (5-3/8"), 18 VDC, DeWalt panel saw that was part of a drill/saw combo kit.
(That size saw has been replaced with a larger unit.)
I have beat the devil out of both tools.
After 10 years, they don't owe me anything.
The panel saw, while small, has still managed to cut 2x stock. Just don't expect it to keep up with a Skil 77, corded unit.
Have fun.
Lew
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I agree with Lew, I have the 18v Dewalt that comes with the kit and it has sawe of barn rafters and you name it. Don't push the saw, let it eat it's way thru. Also use a blade designed for cordless saws (i.e thin kerf). I think the cordless circular saws eat up batteries faster than the other tools in the kit. Also hold the line, don't go halfway thru the board and say aw- gee I am off the mark, and then try to correct it. you will waste the battery right there. Back up and saw again. Good Luck Lyndell

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Jesse,
I have a 18.4 DeWalt, that came with a kit. I like it and use it a lot to break down plywood, cut the occasional 2x4, etc. It's batteries are sort of going (I have 3) after 8 years. I'd look at either the Ryobi or any "semi-pro" brand (DeWalt, Porter Cable, Milwaukee, etc.) Avoid, Craftsman.

MJ Wallace
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I have a Ryobi that replaced an ailing Craftsman. I actually prefered the Craftsman. For BORG-tools, I'd look at Ridgid. I don't have any of their cordless stuff, but they felt better than the Ryobi line last time I went tool fondling.
-MJ

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Jesse wrote:

I'm a professional carpenter, and I have and use a Milwaukee V28 cordless 6 1/2" circular saw regularly. It's lithium powered, has a charge meter built into the battery, and for a cordless tool, is a real workhorse. No cordless saw is a replacement for a corded saw, but a high end tool like the V28 will crosscut ten or twelve 2x6's, and then rip a few 10' 2x4's before the battery winds down. Be warned, they ain't cheap. The saw and two batteries, with a case, runs about $350.00 right now.
I'd usually advise a non-pro to stick with a corded saw, but in your case, it sounds like a legitimate justification for a good cordless. I have less experience with Makita, but I've always found them to be good tools. Dewalt varies from tool to tool, but they're usually OK. I'd definitely recommend getting something with lithium batteries, though. They're about twice the power for their weight as ni-cads, and they can be "topped off" at any time with no penalty. They also last much longer.
Good luck!
Luke
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Am I the ONLY one in this thread to try a good aftermarket blade? <G>
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I bookmarked the webpage you gave. Looked like good prices on those blades. Thanks Lyndell

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On Sun, 16 Dec 2007 14:54:38 -0500, "Lyndell Thompson"

I hope they help you as well as they've helped me.
When I toasted my 1st Makita, Wayne, an employee of the link I posted, led me over to the blades, and mentioned that pretty much everyone had switched.
The stock blade on the DeWalt 18v 6 1/2" saw is better than the 3 3/8" Makita, but still pretty weak.
I remember the first time I used a well sharpened and tuned hand saw, and was shocked at how much better a sawyer I was, and how effortless the saw cut. I'm sure it works the same for any power tool. Also, it always seems that every time a manufacturer wants to save a buck on a power saw, they cheap out on the included blade.
Still, none of these tools will replace a corded version in steady use, but what an improvement!
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I bought the Sears 19.2 Volt set that included the Mini-Skill saw, reciprocating saw, sander and two-speed drill, light, three batteries and a charger.
They have a whole line of tools that "take" the battery (I tink its marketed as the C-3 series).
That little saw is a gem. Not the best for ripping a "two-by," but it will cut a 2 x 6 when called upon.
I do revert to my hypoid-gear skill saw for ripping along a 2 x 6 or a plywood panel as the little saws' blades are thin and like to wander. You need to go slow and pay attention when riping.
I wouldn't buy any of them to serve as the sole saw for constructing a room with 2 x 6 framing, but they are great for occasional use and for trimming an end while on a ladder cutting from underneath!
THe three batteries help with the power concerns as you can keep cycling them through the charger and tools such that you are seldom, if ever, waiting for one to charge.
The kit can be had for less than $200 - watch the clearance shelf - I got my set three years ago (when it first came out) for $180.
I recently built a barn and use the drills (I also have a 14.4 volt (the charger works for the 14.4 and 19.2 VDC Batteries) ) and recipro saw and mini skill saw to do all save some heavy ripping and birds mouth cuts for which I used the Hypoid. Barn is up with no complaints.
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I have a Ryobi and do recommend it as long as you let it do the work. Also Ryobi is one of the few cordless markers who sell all their tools separately.
--
Mike
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I have the Milwaukee V18 CS. It is the first saw I grab when I need to make a couple of cuts. I agree with Barry though the stock blade is good for nothing and a good aftermarket improves the saw at least 2 fold. Also Milwaukee has in their regular 18volt line a car charger. I never have needed one but it is nice to know that I could get one if it should arise. The stand alone saw with 2 batteries and charger is about $300 for the regular batteries or around $400 for the V18 Lithium.
Allen
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made, cuts well and seems to hold a charge for a very long time, plus the batteries as well as the tool has a life-time guarantee. If (when) the batteries fail Ridgid replaces them under the guarantee. Since it's always the battery replacement that is the expensive item, this was a great plus for me.
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JimR wrote:

I did not know that about Ridgid batteries. That's a huge selling point.
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--John
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The lifetime battery deal really is a good deal. The tools are pretty good tools too. Just be aware that the batteries are lifetime warrantee covered by Rigid themselves, and you can't just walk into a Home Depot store and swap out the batteries. Not such a big thing, but it's the kind of thing that would piss you off if you expected you could get the warranty exchange at the Home Depot, only to discover you can't.
--

-Mike-
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