Decent cordless circular saw

Page 1 of 2  
I am wanting a recomendation on selecting a decent circular saw for my son. He has a good corded unit but thinks a cordless would work well for him. It should be capable of crosscutting a treated 2x6 without killing the battery. It should also not kill my wallet. Does anyone have exerience with a best unit per dollar? Thanks for your advice.. Jesse
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can only recommend one with the latest Lithium-Ion battery as they last longer per charge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote

Bingo ... the battery is the achilles heel.
My DeWalt cordless works great for a short time, but any eventually weakening of the battery capacity through use, even though fully charged, will have you reaching for a hand saw long before you can say "jack robinson".
A very limited use item and impractical as hell in an environment where no power is available ... charging on a car battery would have you back to the hand saw, as above.
BTDT
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/14/07
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 15 Dec 2007 23:19:44 GMT, FrozenNorth

without power that needs occational renovation. I could pick from several different brands, Makita, Hitachi or Delta but so far I've only found them in sets with drill, flashlight, etc, all things he does not need. Thanks. Jesse
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jesse said:

Another handy use is in ripping up large sheets of plywood in order to get them into smallish shops/garages for further processing. Also in cutting roof sheathing in situ. It's a hassle to mess with a cord and 7.25" saw when a small, portable unit makes such quick work of it. Finding a good one minus the crap is problematic. If he is going to be using it regularly, avoid the red plastic "homeowner grade" stuff. Bite the bullet and pay once for a tool which will last decades, instead of one which ends up in a landfill within months.
FWIW,
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And maybe a fast mobile charger that works from the car battery - or a solar panel and controller - to recharge the batteries?
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sat, Dec 15, 2007, 11:33pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@telus.net (Jesse) doth now sayeth: You have to stick with me on the cordless part, they have a cabin without power that needs occational renovation. I could pick from several different brands, Makita, Hitachi or Delta but so far I've only found them in sets with drill, flashlight, etc, all things he does not need.
You might have said that in the first place. Some of you guys really need to watch Roy, instead of so much Norm. My first thought would have been a handsaw. With so many of you guys, your frist thought is battery powered. Roy would be so ashamed.
My two sons use cordless tools every day, at their work - no power available at most of their jobsites - if it was. they'd probably opt for corded tools. They, and all their buddies in the trade, at least around here, swear by DeWalt. I have seen them as single tools. Might check Harbor Freight, they sometimes sell factory reconditioned DeWalt tools.
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote in
*snip*

*snip*
If I had a hand powered circle-bladed saw, it'd be a table saw and not a circular saw. It would be awful difficult to turn the hand crank on the side and push the saw through the material! At least with a table saw, you can get an assistant to turn the hand crank as you push the wood through the saw blade!
:-)
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Get one of those fancy new foot-pedal ones, and you can do without the assistant.
-MJ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The best cordless saw won't be much better than the cheap Sears 5" battery saw I occasionally use at work -- which WILL cut through several 2x6s before needing a battery swap. He'd be better off keeping his present saw and buying a generator.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oh ye of so little imagination. First you put down the ever reliable handsaw, and then all you can come up with are wimy cordless circular saws. If you're only open to cordless circular saws, then here's my choice, in order of preference:
http://www.oldengine.org/shows/nta97/jun29_26.jpg
http://bp3.blogger.com/_Xp9E1tSbHek/RgXPelTW4xI/AAAAAAAAADY/Tlqa6eHVynw/s400/000_1113.JPG
http://www.hybridsaw.com/cordless_saw.htm
My first choice would still be a decent handsaw, you could just leave it there, hanging on a nail, and you'd never have to worry about bringing spar batteries along, or how to recharge 'em. You can rip a 2X4 with one, or sheetgoods, just takes a bit longer.
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
With no power, how will he recharge the battery when it runs out?
Jesse wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

vehicle battery. Jesse
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: You have to stick with me on the cordless part, they have a cabin : without power that needs occational renovation.
Thinking outside the box - get him a DC to AC inverter. Then he can use gasoline (and his car engine) to run corded tools and recharge the batteries for his cordless tools. It could come in handy in many situations. Lots of useful things don't come in a cordless option.
Unless he's hoofing it to his cabin with a back-pack (or mule-pack) full of cordless tools and charged up batteries.
Just a thought,
--- Chip
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I am not convinced any of the cordless circular saws are that great. If he needs power were none is available maybe a 2500-4000 watt generator would get some use. Cordless saws eat batteries pretty fast too. If no power is available where will he charge the batteries once they are dead?? Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For the price of a good battery saw you can get him maybe twenty 100 foot extension cords. How far to power?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Where are you buying your cords? Or are you talking about 16/2 cords?
I use a 20AMP rated10/2 and twenty of those would really sent you back some!
A generator is far cheaper
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hoosierpopi wrote:

And good luck getting any power out of a tool running over a half a mile of extension cord.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a Makita 3 3/8" and and DeWalt 6 1/2".
The key to these things is a really good blade, and to immediately throw away the stock version. I use the Makita to rough out sheet goods in my trailer, making them easier to handle on the table saw.
With the brand-new stock blade, the Makita was barely able to cut ~ 8 ft. of 3/4" baltic birch ply per battery. In fact, I burned my first Makita out with a stock blade, as I didn't let it cool between cuts.
The same saw and battery is able to cut over 40 ft. of the same material with a $20 carbide blade installed, with no serious motor heating.
The difference was beyond belief!
I saw similar improvements on my DeWalt, cutting tubas.
The blades I have are Matsushita: <http://www.coastaltool.com/cgi-bin/SoftCart.exe/a/ab/matsushita/matsushita.htm?L+coastest+lptv4969ffeb04eb+1197900558
There are lots of similar blades selling for similar prices that will probably work just as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
" they have a cabin without power that needs occasional renovation. "
In that case, get them a generator. You will be killing a flock of birds with one present.
The mini saws will kill the battery faster if the work load increases. The batteries will lose some charge while sitting.And going back home to recharge them is a real drag.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.