DE-Rusting tools a bad way.... courtesy of Nick Engle.

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I recently tried using Nick Engle's potato solution for getting rid of rust. I found it searching the internet and decided not to do the reverse electrolytic process I had found.
I am not sure this method of using potatoes was a good idea. I think I could have gotten the same results without the potatoes using just oil and elbow grease. The biggest downside is the stink of the potato solution, and now the tools stink. I can't get rid of the stink.
I don't recommend this. I have tried mineral spirits, acetone, alchohol, etc... nothing will get rid of the smell. 1month after it still stinks.
Go electrolytic, don't follow his advice it is bad.... real bad.
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On 10/29/10 11:13 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

Soak them in gravy. :-)
--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
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wrote:

Or melt some cheese on them.
R
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Use charcoal briquetts. Just grind them up into a powder and coat the tools with them. After 24 hours clean and rinse. The charcoal has some kind of negative charge or something that sucks up smells. I think it would work just to pile them all in a closed box together for a few days with no powderizing. Can use briquetts to get rid of cat piss oder, etc. But don't use after.
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That's a great idea. Thanks.
On 10/29/2010 12:23 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

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On Fri, 29 Oct 2010 11:13:26 -0400, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

It's an organic rot. Bleach will kill it, ammonia might, and lemon juice might.
Have you made the potato-based doll of Nick Engle yet? How many pins will it hold?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WoAXW30mMAg

-- Ask not what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive... then go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive. -- Howard Thurman
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wrote:

I have absolutely NO idea why, but it took me 10 minutes to get the tears out of my eyes from laughing so hard. Some shit just hits me funny. It's a keeper.
"It's an organic rot."
rich... real rich.
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On Sat, 30 Oct 2010 10:00:38 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

I suppose it's somewhat redundant, tho. Gladja liked it.

Potatoes are organic. Potatoes rot and stink horribly. Ripe, rich scents, too.
-- Small opportunities are often the beginning of great enterprises. -- Demosthenes
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"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

Various analyses have shown what common-sense reflection has no trouble endorsing: storing knives in slots in blocks makes the latter a great bacterial reservoir. Of course, if you scrupulously dry, chemically disinfect or autoclave your knives and use a block maintained in germicidal condition, you're all good.
Aside, when Carl Linnaeus first grouped bacteria and viruses, he put them under the taxonomic heading "Chaos".
Regards,
EH
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Egads and oops. Apologies to all for a misplaced reply which will be relocated momentarily.
Regards,
EH
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wrote:

Please explain how a wood in a cutting board has anti bacterial properties, but when it's made into knife storage, it becomes a death trap.
Your body has its own defenses. Use them - exercise them. This anti bacterial _everything_ crap is doing way more harm than good.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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wrote:

Please explain how a wood in a cutting board has anti bacterial properties, but when it's made into knife storage, it becomes a death trap.
Your body has its own defenses. Use them - exercise them. This anti bacterial _everything_ crap is doing way more harm than good.
R
I have never heard that wood has antibacterial properties. Or plastic. The point that was perhaps not acutely made is that if knives are ever put away wet--or dirty--in a dark trap like a slot, it would follow that the chances of bacterial formation increase as does likelihood of corrosion in certain blade steel.
Regards,
EH
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wrote:

Plastic does not, wood does. Check the link to the research in the cutting board thread.

People that put away wet and dirty knives should not cook...or procreate.
R
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wrote:

Plastic does not, wood does. Check the link to the research in the cutting board thread.

People that put away wet and dirty knives should not cook...or procreate.
R
R:
A Skoptic would say that preventing that last excercise is the best use for knives.
Regards,
EH
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On Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:56:30 -0700, "Edward Hennessey"

Lorena, honey, is that you?
-- Ask not what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive... then go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive. -- Howard Thurman
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LJ:
You, sir, have renovated the reference of the bard with part for heart:
Marcus Antonius: For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel. Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar lov'd him! This was the most unkindest cut of all; For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquish'd him: then burst his mighty heart. . . .
Julius Caesar Act 3, scene 2, 181-186
Even wierder was the dating darling the bobbed one became after his, uh, um, "resextion".
Regards,
EH
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Plus, who puts dirty knives back in the block? I assume most people wash them first.
scott
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*snip*

My favorite is the automatic soap dispenser. How conveinent that pressing on the germy handle puts soap in your hands to kill the germs.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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On 30 Oct 2010 03:53:44 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

C'mon, Pucky. Don't you wipe some of the drippy soap onto the germy button before pressing it?
But then how does one get out of the bathroom? Some folks don't wash their hands after using the restroom. We're stranded until someone else comes in!
-- Ask not what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive... then go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive. -- Howard Thurman
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