DC2000 (Penn State DC) on 110 V, 20 A Circuit?

Can I run it? Specs say that motor is rated for a max of 9A at 220, but running amperage will be "significantly less".
Anyone have experience with this?
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On 27 Oct 2004 13:50:27 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (gammonus) wrote:

I do. No problem after >1 year. Only problem has been a bad switch -- replaced once and it is broken again (this time the part that holds it in place).
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Here is my experience. Last month I purchased a DC2000 canister dust collector and converted it to 110 volts. I run it on a 20 amp circuit simultaneously with either a 1.75HP (15amp) table saw or a 16 amp planer. I tripped the breakers on 2 occasions. Once when I was ripping 10/4 oak and another time when I was continuously planing 8" oak planks for over an hour. I have not had a problem otherwise after about 20 hours of use over the past month.
On 2004-10-27 15:50:27 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (gammonus) said:

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There are three amperage values. Normal running, maximum, and starting.
If 9A is maximum, then starting is probably 25 or 30a and running about 3 or 4a. Maximum is also known as the stall amperage because it hits that when the motor is so over worked from clogged bag and restricted ducts that it is about to stall.
But, you see the problem with using it at 120v. If it is 30a starting at 240v, then it is 60a at 120v. You aren't going to get 60a over #12, and the motor won't like starting at reduced amperage.
So, you can do it, but it is not a great idea.
My PS DC was advertised as having an 18a motor, but it shipped with a 16a motor. When I complained, they didn't have the courtesy to answer. Good Luck.
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I have the DC2000, and on startup it draws 40A at 240V. That would mean 80A at 120V. You might get away with it on a dedicated 120V, 20A circuit, but if you're thinking about putting it on a shared 120V circuit, that's not likely to work.
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I run my DC2000 on a shared circuit without any startup problem. (Only when simulataneously pushing my table saw or planer really hard will I trip the breaker).
While it is true the DC2000 probably pushes the amps above wha your circuit breaker is rated for, the breaker will typically trip only if the wire heats up from a sustained overage. I doubt a second or two at 80 amps will trip most 20 amp breakers; it certainly doesn't trip mine.
Just remember to turn on the dust collector first without anything else on. Then turn on yourtable saw after waiting a few seconds. Also, if you have tripped your breaker half a dozen times, it will have worn a bit and will be more sensitive to current overages.
Hope this helps.
Lars
On 2004-10-28 20:56:10 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@fast.net (Kent) said:

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