Day 2 Saw Stop Assembly

OK this morning I began the assembly of the actual saw. Wow, not much to do. Attach the left cast iron extension wing and add the bevel wheel handle. the wheel was already mounted. Add the power cord and the saw is done.
Then comes the add on 52" capacity rip fence.
The left extension from the bottom side. http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8683243275/in/photostream
All the hardware to just put the saw together http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8683243945/in/photostream/
Bottom of the Extension Table http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8683244611/in/photostream/
The saw! http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8684362184/in/photostream/
52" rip capacity http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8684362752/in/photostream/
12" to the left of the blade http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8684363276/in/photostream/
Long ass honk'n wrenches. I suppose you can get the arbor nut tight enough with these. ;~) http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8684410792/in/photostream/
I need to adjust the fence and add the power cable and I should be ready to cut wood! Except for dealing with heavy stuff the assembly has bee perfect. No missing holes, no holes in the wrong place.
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It looks like a fine saw. Similar to a good Unisaw or 66. Just with the s afety features the SawStop adds. Which is good. But I still can't underst and why you or anyone would choose a cabinet saw over a sliding tablesaw? The Professional model starts at about $2900. And the Industrial model sta rts at about $3900. For not much more or about the same price, you can get one of the European sliding tablesaws. The sliding part more or less elim inates the safety part the SawStop adds. Its just as safe as the SawStop. But far more functional with the sliding table.
On Friday, April 26, 2013 2:26:02 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:




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If you already own a top of the line plunge cut saw like a Festool '55 or '75, there is much less need for a Euro sliding saw table.
--
www.ewoodshop.com (Mobile)

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Perhaps better over all, at least 100 lbs more iron, 685 lbs. 30 inch deep table, straight up and down blade travel like the euro saws, the trunion assy bolts to the cabinet and the top indexes in, pivots, and bolts on the trunion. The 66 did have a Baldor motor.
Just with the safety features the SawStop adds. Which is good. But I still can't understand why you or anyone would choose a cabinet saw over a sliding tablesaw? The Professional model starts at about $2900. And the Industrial model starts at about $3900. For not much more or about the same price, you can get one of the European sliding tablesaws. The sliding part more or less eliminates the safety part the SawStop adds. Its just as safe as the SawStop. But far more functional with the sliding table.
For starters, only right tilt. I strongly considered the Laguna TSS with scoring and sliding table but out feed table takes up a lot of room, Comparably priced, about $1000 more. The euro saws are safer than American style saws however you can still do serious harm to yourself should you make a mistake. There is absolutely no way a euro stole saw is as safe as a SawStop.
YMMV

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On Fri, 26 Apr 2013 12:55:39 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"
sliding tablesaws. The sliding part more or less eliminates the safety part the SawStop adds. Its just as safe as the SawStop. But far more functional with the sliding table.
Really, they come that cheap? Even the General Model 50-320 runs about $12,000.
I talked a little about sliding table saws with Leon several days ago. We both envisioned a Martin or an Altendorf. Considering the one I had in mind was in the neighbourhood of $30,000, they were just a little more than the price of any SawStop.
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On 4/27/2013 2:18 AM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

sliding tablesaws. The sliding part more or less eliminates the safety part the SawStop adds. Its just as safe as the SawStop. But far more functional with the sliding table.

Actually for a Grizzly from Asia             http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-Sliding-Table-Saw/G0623X
For a Euro Laguna TSS with Scoring Blade http://www.lagunatools.com/tablesaws/tablesaw-tssws
For a Euro Hammer http://www.hammerusa.com/us-us/products/table-saws/table-saw-k3-winner-31x48.html
The biggest problem s I had with the Euro saws is 1. Right tilt blade 2. Cant lift the rip fence off the top of the saw, it has to bel slid to the end of the guide rail 3. Can't use the opposite side of the fence for a work stop during other woodworking tasks. 4. The footprint. 5. None have a mobility system that would suite my needs.
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Leon wrote:

Where was it made?
--
 GW Ross 

 In nature, there are no rewards or 
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IIRC it is Built in Asia. However it is not an Asian model modified to what SawStop wanted so to speak. The total design is SawStop.
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On 4/26/2013 9:14 PM, Leon wrote:

That blows, I thought it was made here in the US.
--
Jeff

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On 4/26/2013 9:12 PM, woodchucker wrote:

If it were made in the US it would cost twice as much. Not to mention no manufacturer wanted to have anything to do with it.
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On 4/26/13 9:12 PM, woodchucker wrote:

If it was, it would cost 10 grand.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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"Leon" wrote:

<snip>
A word of caution.
Looking at your pics, you have a cap start, cap run motor that has been shoe horned into the innards of the saw, which translates into some bastard mounting arrangement.
Translation:
If you have to replace that motor, it's going to be expensive, and that does include the out and in charges to do the job.
Make sure that motor is protected with a thermal overload before you start cutting.
DO NOT depend on the c'bkr or fuses mounted back at the wall or in the panel box to protect the motor, they are for the conductors feeding the motor.
They ain't never going to protect the motor.
I suspect there is already is a thermal overload installed, but you never know.
Have fun.
Lew
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Not sure what you are talking about here, the motor hangs under everything.

It is, there is a code on the motor start switch box should that happen.
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"Leon" wrote:

--------------------------------------------- "Lew Hodgett" wrote:
That wasn't evident from your pics, but it sure makes life a lot more simplier. ------------------------------------------------ "Leon" wrote:

------------------------------------------------ "Lew Hodgett" wrote:
Does it turn off the motor and require a manual reset?
Lew
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Take a look here http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8680319295/in/photostream/

Yes, if over loaded the system will shut off the motor and show an error code. To clear the code the motor paddle switch must be turned off and then you must turn off the Main power switch and then back on in reverse order.

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What you may have seen was the belt side of the saw. There are 2 serpentine style belts. One belt runs off the motor to a transition pulley, next to that pulley is another that turns a belt that is connected to the arbor pulley.
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"Leon" wrote:

--------------------------------------------- "Lew Hodgett" wrote:

------------------------------------------------ "Leon" wrote:

------------------------------------------------- "Lew Hodgett" wrote:
Saw that post but it didn't show me the motor was low.
Mea Culpa.
Does it turn off the motor and require a manual reset?
------------------------------------------- "Leon" wrote:

------------------------------------------- Super.
Lew
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I might have missed it, but what are you going to do for dust collection? Also, any plans for an over arm blade guard/dust collection? (Amazon.com product link shortened)
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On 4/27/2013 2:08 AM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Ill be using my dust collector.... No plans for over arm.
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