David vs Norm - tools

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And:
I don't know whether you realize it or not, but you've stumbled onto the key difference between Norm and DJM: Marks creates, while Norm duplicates.
No slight intended to Norm by that statement, either. He's skilled at what he does, but he's not an artist.
When you don't find measured "drawerings" of DJM's work, it's because there were probably no drawings or plans at all. He sketches cut lines on the work until it looks right.
Marks works with wood, not paper. One of Norm's shortcomings is that he duplicates blueprints, regardless of what the wood wants to do. This is *wood*working, afterall, not machining. It's all about the wood.
Or if it's not about the wood, then just shoot a couple of brads in it until the glue dries, then stain it and cover it with polyurethane.
Kevin
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RayV wrote:

"shop tour" episode. He bought the jointer used, and he talked a bit about hunting for old iron when building your shop.
I got the distinct impression that he bought the lathe new, after he began to make a name for himself. I don't know why, but I suspect it was a present he bought himself after getting paid for one of his first big-money commissions.
In that shop tour ep, he also showed off his first bandsaw, a standard 14-inch with an extended table he built, and the one he usually uses on the show: a monolith in the same class as that aircraft carrier of a jointer.
When the pros get paid like pros, they get a proper-size shop and they buy the big iron.
In my case, as in others, I couldn't fit even one of those things in the shop and still have room to swing a board.
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<snip>

I had the privelege of visiting in David's shop for a few minutes last summer. There were four bandsaws, at least. One of them was at least a 24" version. MiniMax, IIRC.
The work that David did for the show is just the sort that can be shown in 18-22 minnute segments. His REAL stuff is mind-blowing artistic, and of a larger scale than most of the more mundane machinery will handle. His shop, though, is pretty humble, as is he. Seems to be a pretty good fellow. As Norm is reported to be, by those who have met him.
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:

36" MM, biggest one they make ;)
He is indeed a humble and unassuming guy. Much like Norm's reputation.
He made an offhanded comment about some of his projects that weren't for the show that took in excess of 500 hours with some exceeding 1000 hours.
Awesome work, work I aspire to.
Michael
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Thank you. It was a fortuitous set of circumstances that permitted me to get all the programs and put that site together. It would be very difficult now for someone to try and duplicate the effort, since there's probably not any source for programs from the first eleven or twelve years of the show except to buy the videos from NYW (at $15 a pop or more).
Moreover, there are a LOT of the tools used in the early years that would be very difficult to find pictures or information of now. I also must acknowledge the help of a lot of friends from the Wreck and other woodworking fora plus several visitors to the site who steered me toward some tool IDs (and corrected some) and in some cases even provided photos.
I didn't get DIY channel for any of the years that Wood Works was first run, so I'm a latecomer to his show, but I think I've seen all the episodes. There haven't been any produced since '02, I don't think, and I've heard DIY didn't renew the contract for more. I did give some thought to doing a similar page, but I just don't have the energy for it, and I'm afraid some of the same locatibilty issues might arise with some of his tools similar to those mentioned above from the early years of NYW.
Although I've never met Norm, I did meet David a year or so ago, when he was invited to a picnic of local Florida woodworkers in the Orlando area while here for a WoodCraft presentation. He was very affable and clearly glad to be with us as fellow woodworkers.
I've had that vessel and several others of his projects in my hands. TV does not do them justice. If you've ever seen the bowl he turned out of maple with an ebony ring, that was another I've held. I remarked to him that it just wasn't fair that there wasn't a single sanding mark on it. He replied that there was a considerable amount of off-lathe sanding on his work. Something learned.
Another of the picnicers and I made a Krenov style plane (friend did the wood work, I made the iron out of an edger blade) for him at the picnic before food was served and before he got there. He later emailed us and said it worked great. That was cool.
Nice, down to earth guy.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
  Click to see the full signature.
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RayV wrote:

I've seen several posts about it, but does anyone know who made that jointer? Or even (quantitatively) how big it is?
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12 powermatic, or at least it was green.
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No... but there are several sources for BIG Iron.. Here is one of the orignals...
http://www.northfieldwoodworking.com /
http://www.northfieldwoodworking.com/jointers/jointers.htm
or even the old standby:
http://www.deltamachinery.com/index.asp?e 6&p5
They also make a 16" on the industrial side but I can't find a picture of it.
PS:
A 24" jointer is very scary machine to even see, little less turn one on.
Heath Roberts wrote:

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