David vs Norm - tools

Page 1 of 2  
I was watching Mr Marks turn a vessel the other day on a lathe that looks as though it is big enough to turn the main shaft for the Titanic. Where does he get these giantic tools like the jointer wide enough to do an entry door?
This website has an episode guide for Norm and the tools he uses I was wondering if anyone did something similar for Woodworks? http://www.woodbutcher.net/episode.htm
Curious newbie who can't afford what either of them have.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mr Marks is an interesting guy. I only recently began to watch him. My cable company finally picked him up. He is half artist and half woodworker.
His tools seem to be half exotic and half recycled old iron. He has a small oldtimer lathe that he learned on that he still uses. He keeps the old ones around for sentimental reasons.
The lathe you saw was a Oneway lathe. See them at
http://www.oneway.on.ca/lathes /
They are a high end, big buck, industrial kind of lathe. Not many little guys can afford (or house) such a monster. But they are well engineered and purty!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mon, Sep 18, 2006, 10:09am leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net (Lee Michaels) doth sayeth: <snip> They are a high end, big buck, industrial kind of lathe. Not many little guys can afford (or house) such a monster. But they are well engineered and purty!
There is a however, as always. The however is, people have made their own versions, for a lot less, and even larger. Somewhere around here I've got enough info on how it has been done (on hard copy) to make your own. I've got plans around for a wood lathe, that can basically be made about any length you reasonably want, say 6-8 feet between centers. The metal ones are really hevy duty, including on that a guy turns bowls and stuff up to about 6 foot thru. Depending on what you're after one could include a car/truck axle, possibly one, or more, car/truck transmissions. If they're not heavy enough, some have hollow legs, so they can be weighted down - even more - with sand, lead, whatever. You might want to have a real strong floor too. I haven't pursued any of this because, for now, my HF lathe answers all my needs. I would imagine some of this stuff is somewhere on the web.
JOAT I am not paranoid. I do not "think" people are after me. I "know" damn well they're after me.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"RayV" wrote in message

Yep ... that's one of the long time, regular participants here and is typical of why the wRec can lead you to, or be, a veritable treasure trove of information, free for the asking.

Take heart ... DJM was once a newbie himself. With the same amount of interest and dedication to woodworking, who knows what "big iron" may lie in your future?
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/29/06
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RayV wrote:

You mean the joiner that doubles as the flight deck for an aircraft carrier?
David does an show where he walks you thru the shop and talks about the tools.
BTW, you can watch him on the web at:
[http://www.diynetwork.com/webdiy/channels/woodworking /]
Jess.S
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 18 Sep 2006 14:43:26 GMT, Jesse R Strawbridge

Isn't that a Northfield jointer?
Let's think about it - how many hobbyists need or could use such a machine? Or even have a place to put one? My DJ-20 is as big (and as expensive) as I can have, for many reasons. My opinion is that that's likey true for most other hobbyists too. Pros on the other hand, may have the need and business justification for such equipment.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

A cabinet making buddy of mine has a 12" jointer in his shop. Picked it up in an auction for $600. Some things really suck.
My problem is too many tools for tha space I have, and needing to roll a bunch of stuff to the driveway, in order to make something...
Patriarch
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Patriarch wrote:

Especially because now you don't need your own 12" machine for occasional 12" jointing tasks. <wink>
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I got a pretty sweet deal on a completely rebuilt, 50+ yr old Delta Milwaukee last spring. 8" wide, long bed, relatively quiet. Sees not too much use, though. A buddy of mine may buy it next month.
See, there is more crunch in space in the shop, than in space in the wallet, most months. Tools should be appreciated, used. And my lathe is getting a lost of the attention these days...
Patriarch
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Norm has his share of "exotic" tools too. Like that machine for making mouldings. Or the big thickness sander. Just to name two off the top of my head.
I think Norm's projects are more accessible to the average woodworker.
Many of David's are lot more involved. Lots of steps to take before being able to make the object. Setups, templates and so on. And even then, the shows of several of his project don't give enough info to make a duplicate yourself. And there's no plans available either. If you're determined to make one of those, better get out the drafting board or cad program and work out what's missing for yourself. And even then it won't be exactly like what was shown in his program.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George Max wrote:

David and Norm approach woodworking a bit differently, which helps to understand how each develop their projects. Norm was a construction site carpenter first, who learned the practical methods of building furniture. He uses brads profusely, but his projects are easily understood if not doable in a weekend (tell me that the Mahogany Victorian dining room table he just built takes 20 hours :). David on the other hand was schooled in fine arts and learned from "fine arts" craftsman. Norm was mostly self taught. Both are very talented in their own rights and I would never say one is Better than the other. They are different is all.
I've met David a few times and have taken a class from him. He's a very practical woodworker actually. His tools were mostly acquired for a reasonable amount, and a fair bit of elbow grease :) The jointer is an excellent example as is his 20" Delta / Milwaukee bandsaw. The Oneway is definetly high end, but was purchased for large outboard turnings (big bowls and those circular plaques he makes).
One other thing, a number of David's project plans are available for purchase from his website (www.djmarks.com). Every one of them was completed by David in less than 60 hours. It was done this way to ensure that they all fit within the networks tight scheduling for shooting the show. Not saying that an "average woodworker" would be able to complete one in the same amount of time, but that they aren't as unreasonable as one may think.
Michael
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't think *any* of his stuff is unreasonable, or undoable, it's just that there's plenty of projects, like the elliptical mirror or that koa floor lamp that don't have plans available and important dimensions are not given during the show for them.
Plus, as in the case of the floor lamp, he only says that the alabaster lamp shade is available from any number of sources. Huh? Where? I tried to find one and didn't. So I didn't even try to work out the missing dimensions on that one. Without a shade that looks like the one in the episode, I'd be disappointed in the result.
I'm in the process of working out the elliptical mirror, but again, important dimensions are not given and there's no plan. This one is somewhat simpler in that I only have to draw something that looks about right.
Norm will name a source for project parts. That's useful. There may be other sources too. At least having one source means I can make my own copy for myself.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 18 Sep 2006 15:20:48 GMT, George Max wrote:

Beg to differ:
http://djmarks.com/woodworks.asp
Not all, but some, especially the earliest episodes. Nothing for the last three seasons, though.
--
Art Greenberg
artg at eclipse dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Please post the URL to get Mr. Mark's plan for the sculpted elliptical mirror and the bent laminate lamp.
I didn't say that there were no plans available at all. What I said was
"the shows of several of his projects don't give enough info to make a duplicate yourself. And there's no plans available either. If you're determined to make one of those, better get out the drafting board or cad program and work out what's missing for yourself. And even then it won't be exactly like what was shown in his program."
Of course I could be wrong.
I think a lot of time has passed from those last 3 seasons. Surely there's been enough time to have drawn up a plan. However, I know Mr. Marks is a very busy man and if he's the one that creates the drawings that's probably why there are no plans for some projects. If that's the case, he could hire someone like me to make the drawings for him.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was lucky enough to have taped all the "Wood Works" shows. It comes out to 13 DVD's. It was nice when it was on twice a day in the morning.
Gary
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

It's even nicer with TiVo. <G>
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Did both. Tivo is sorta temporary so I moved them onto DVD.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's exactly what I did. That way it allowed me to put them in order of showing.
A DVR is great!
Gary
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George Max wrote:

Exactly...
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I got em too, but they are still on my PC.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.