Darkening White Oak Finish

A neighbor has what looks like a white oak breakfast table. It is a commercial table with what looks like a light finish; maybe poly. As this table is the only thing in the house that is a light color, the question is: how would one darken it to better match the rest of the household furniture; other than selling it and buying something that matches? Can it be stripped or just sanded to put a stain on it?
Thunder
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That gets rather sticky. A breakfast table often takes quite a bit of abuse, and it may well have a conversion varnish on top. Further, it's probably a veneer, so you can't sand too much. You could add color on top then another topcoat, but it won't stand up nearly as well. If it's solid wood or thick veneer and going to be treated nicely, then you've got a shot at it. Make sure, of course, that it's not really plastic, as some can fool you. GerryG

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wrote:

A dark table cloth? Darkening white oak kills its natural beauty.
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I once asked a carpenter how much for installation on an entry door I had purchased. He told me that the price for installation was the same as the cost of the door. This seemed a little high for a door install so I asked him about it and he said it was so if he screwed it up he could replace the door.
This story comes to mind when I think about the project you mentioned. IMHO sanding off a cured commercial finish and the underlying stain if it is verneer without damaging it would be an accomplished feat not for the faint of heart. Personally I doubt it could be done, speaking in context of the finishes I am accustomed to applying (conversion varnishes, pre-cat lacquer, etc.).
Is it oak hardwood? What about the edge details that will have to be sanded? Maybe disassemble the table and sand off the finish/stain then cut off the edge detail and reedge with a router bit. This might save time overall. If its not oak hardwood but one of the cheap hardwoods they use in commercial furniture production I would pass it up. Better yet quote them a table you can build yourself!
I have never used strippers other than cleaning a conversion gun so I have no experience there.
Rich

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wrote:

I'll have another, closer look to verify. It looks like something you'd get at an oak furniture store. I'll have to verify it isn't a veneer.
Thunder
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wrote:

It is possible that ammonia fumes will darken it with the finish left in place. An article in FWW many years ago (Tage Frid??) described an emergency save of a contract job that was accomplished that way.

Rodney Myrvaagnes NYC J36 Gjo/a
"Biologists think they are chemists, chemists think they are phycisists, physicists think they are gods, and God thinks He is a mathematician." Anon
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