Dangers of wood stove in shop without dust collection

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Hey folks. I'm moving into my new house ( and shop) next week. I am a bit concerned about the setup in my shop however. There is a woodstove for heat, and I do not have a dust collection setup. Am I looking at a fire hazard here?
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airborne dust that comes through the filters or is never collected in the first place (dust collection systems are not 100% effective).
Best solution is to have the woodshop and the wood stove in different rooms.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
For a copy of my TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter, send email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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On the other hand, wood stoves and wood shops have peacefully coexisted for hundreds of years. Dust explosions in the air require incredibly high dust concentrations. The dust levels are so high breathing would not be possible. I had a stove in my shop for many years. A few simple rules: Do not run the stove hard (hot) if you are not there watching it, Clean the stack annually and follow code for installation. Dave
wrote:

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Combustible material in the presence of flame is an obvious fire hazard. Who said anything about explosion?

-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
For a copy of my TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter, send email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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Doug Miller wrote:

I think some of us saw that as implied in your original reply Doug. Your reply below would seem to only apply to explosion since airborne dust burning is not a very realistic concern.

--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
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It looks like such an obvious hazard to me. But you do have a point about them coexisting for years. Wasn't any dust collection back in the day, and they only had wood or coal to keep em warm.
wrote:

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js responds:

I thought seriously about a woodstove in my shop a few years ago. I have a good friend who runs ye olde basic woodstove, cleans the flue when he remembers (not often), knocks the dust off the top when he lights the stove, has a pretty close to code set-up, and has never had a single problem. It sometimes makes me nervous.
I know another guy, nice guy but I don't know him well enough to call him a friend. Interviewed James for Woodshop News some years ago and discovered his shop had wood heat. You'd never know it: The stove is in the basement, almost totally separate from the woodworking area. He is in the shop ever day, follows every known care, and has never had a single problem.
You figure it out. I put in an electric furnace, free from a local HVAC dealer who had pulled it out as he installed a completely new set-up for someone (this is common, and sometimes the dealers have to pay to get rid of the stuff, so at least check it out).
Charlie Self "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics." Disraeli as quoted by Mark Twain
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On Mon, 03 May 2004 12:55:19 GMT, "js"

Didn't have power tools making fine dust though.
And in the 19th century, exploding workshops _were_ a hazard.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Andy Dingley wrote:

So when did a work shop in the 1800s that was making something other than gunpowder explode?
--
--John
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On Mon, 03 May 2004 13:14:39 -0400, "J. Clarke"

How many instances do you want ? If you live in an older city, go and look in your local records - you're bound to find them. How about Boston and the infamous Molasses Tsunami ? Or Gateshead, where molten lead from the roof fire spilt down onto picric acid used for dyeing, and the resultant lead picrate explosive demolished half of the quayside.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Andy Dingley wrote:

Which incident has about the same relevance to the issue of woodstoves in wood shops as does Chernobyl.
--
--John
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J. Clarke wrote:

Well...after Chernobyl, I did rule out having a Russian made nuclear reactor in my home wood shop. :)
Tim
--
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J. Clarke wrote:

Well...after Chernobyl, I did rule out having a Russian made nuclear reactor in my home wood shop. :)
Tim
--
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Maybe not wood shops, but flour mills didn't even allow candles in the building.

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Sweet Sawdust wrote:

A flour mill is not a "workshop", it's a "mill".
--
--John
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Doug Miller wrote:

I respectfully disagree. This has been debunked many times and a simple google search will reveal ample converstion on this very topic. Your woodshop will not generate the concentration of particulates necessary for combustion. Woodstoves, open pilot light furnaces, etc. exist in woodshops all over the place and there are just no substantiating cases of fires, explosions, etc. If this were truely a problem, you'd be at equal risk from the spark that occurs everytime you throw a common household light switch in the garage. Those that continue to advocate that a woodstove can be a source of explosion due to airborne dust seem to overlook that little spark that eminates from their light switch.
--

-Mike-
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To see how our perception on hazard has changed over time Watch the 1890's house the next time it is on PBS. After restoring the house to the condition its was in 1890 and with the 1890 appliances, they had a very difficult time in getting the regulator to permit people to live today with those items.
For combustion to occur the combustible to air ratio has to be in very tight limits.
Mike Marlow wrote:

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BS. Before I ever got a DC, I hqd dust flying from my TS, Router and plqner while I was heating the shop with a woodburning stove.
The dust consintration is not high enough to cause an explosion or spntainous combustion.
IF the dust consintration ever got high enough to create a fire by spontainous combustion, you would not want to be in the room. AND IF YOU WERE NOT IN THE ROOM, NO DUST WOUKD BE MADE,.
Makes you wonder what kind of heat was used on mills before there was electricity?
==
Re: Dangers of wood stove in shop without dust collection Group: rec.woodworking Date: Mon, May 3, 2004, 12:31pm (MDT+6) From: snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (DougMiller)
Hey folks. I'm moving into my new house ( and shop) next week. I am a bit concerned about the setup in my shop however. There is a woodstove for heat, and I do not have a dust collection setup. Am I looking at a fire hazard here?
Yes. And you might be, even *with* a dust collection system, because of fine airborne dust that comes through the filters or is never collected in the first place (dust collection systems are not 100% effective). Best solution is to have the woodshop and the wood stove in different rooms.
--

Regards,
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0Doug Miller
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As far as fire hazards, with reasonable caution and good house keeping, not particularly.
Now if you are talking trouble with finishes, glues, possibly rust and if you live somewhere where the shop will go below freezing regularly you'd best be thinking about what to do with them. For the most part they don't fair well at low temperatures.
Also keep in mind that if you crank up the woodstove and shop is warm and toasty it doesn't mean the various items and liquids in the shop have reached good working temperatures.
Congratulations on the house and shop.
--
Mike G.
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You bring up a very good point here Mike. The front part of my shop is a separate room, and I saw thinking of using it as a finishing room. I think an electric heater is the way to go for that part of the shop to keep finishes from freezing. excellent point.

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