Damn stupid

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On 12/9/2013 10:23 AM, Michael wrote:

That's similar to what I have, but rather than thicker mine are thinner so I get the max depth on cuts. I used tempered hardboard.
It's efficient and does what I need.
--
Jeff

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On 12/9/13, 11:36 AM, woodchucker wrote:

If you make a saw guide like this, take the extra time and effort to make darn sure it's straight. I have yet to see a 1x4 that was straight. You might be better off to use the factory edge of a good sheet of plywood for the guide fence.
If you do use a 1x4 or similar wood stock, use something you know is straight as a reference when attaching it to the thinner plywood sheet. Or take care to strike a good, clean line with a chalk-line first.
However you do it, it should be checked after making the first cut by placing the guide on a long surface, scribing a line along the newly cut guide edge. Then rotate the whole thing 180degrees, and align it to the line you just scribed. Scribe a new line very close to or on top of the first line. Inspect the two lines. If they are perfectly parallel or on top of one another, your guide is straight. If they do not stay parallel, but look like very elongated parentheses (curving in or out), the guide is not straight.
If you will be using this cutting guide to rough cut sheathing for framing carpentry, then don't worry about doing this check. If you're using the guide for cutting finish plywood for cabinets and bookcases, etc., it will be well worth your effort to take these additional steps in making your guide. Even a minute error that makes your guide non-straight will multiply itself, creating poor joinery and gaps in seems.
--

-MIKE-

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On 12/7/2013 9:46 PM, Jeff Mazur wrote:

I have a cutting grid. basically 2x4s. that are half notched, they fit into each other, I put them on a set of saw horses or on the floor. it supports sheets, large lengths of flat goods..
when I am done I store them flat.
it was cheap, stores efficiently and goes where I want it. Set up time is about 2 minutes.
--
Jeff

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wrote:

Nice idea! I was planning a 4'x8' cutting table but this sounds like a better idea, or even a "topper". The pieces are easily replaced.
I've basically done the same thing for my truck so I can haul 12' sheetrock (to finish the basement) and siding (this spring's task). I left them whole, vertically, for support, and then used 1/4-20 cross-nuts and bolts to hold it all together.
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To the OP:
The most basic thing I have not heard anyone mention, so I feel like someone needs to.
NEVER cut a piece of lumber with the circ saw between the supports. One side of the cut must be free to fall away due to gravity, or at the very least it can be laying flat on support like the grid or Styrofoam ideas. Cutting between the supports WILL cause kick-back EVERY time.
Sorry if that was too basic.
--
Jim in NC



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On Monday, December 9, 2013 3:17:56 AM UTC-5, Morgans wrote: (snip)

Not at all too basic - NOTHING'S too basic for me, just starting. I will in the future either allow fall-away or use solid support with a sacrifice surface beneath if I need a production-grade cut mid-board. Thanks to all!
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On 12/9/13, 8:50 AM, Mike Marlow wrote:

I usually try to have two sacrificial 2x4s around for things like this. The 2x4s sit across the sawhorses with the plywood sitting on the 2x4s, running the length of the plywood.
As with the foam sheet, you set the blade depth to just clear the gullets of the teeth. The blade only cuts into the 2x4s about a 1/4-1/2" and they still fully support the plywood with no "drop-off" section and no need to worry where the sawhorses are positioned.
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I use a couple of saw horses, 2x4s across them as support, set depth of cut 1/4-1/2" into the 2x4s.
--

dadiOH
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On 12/7/2013 4:00 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I suppose there is a lesson there, that even the lowly, what I would call masonite, is as dangerous as any hardwood. I suspect the danger lay in that is more flexible...
Hoping for a good recovery from your war wound. The only ones who never get hurt are the ones who do nothing.
My 24 tooth 10" Freud ripper came a day ago. It looks like it should command respect!
Cheers, Jeff

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On 12/8/2013 8:20 AM, j wrote:

As previously mentioned I too use a 2x4 2'x8' grid that sets on top of saw horses which also serves as a work surface when I toss a couple of 4'x4' sheets of 3/4" plywood on top.
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